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Thread: Online (post-geographic) Localism.

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    The silver age of dissensus was intelligent, imaginative and passionate, but arguably died because of the forum's post-geographic nature.

    London's sense of humour, it's conversational speed, etc. were the motors behind the silver age and you can see that, with some exceptions, the further a away a user was from London, the more alienated they were by the silver age.
    It was also literally just me you and corpse being brilliant and showing off for one another though. I loved it but would be good to get everyone wanting to play the same game.

  2. #17

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    maybe the problem of creating anything new is people are so immediately dismissive, wanting to reduce it to an arithmetic of previous styles to show they're with it, they understand the reference points, it's all so easy to demystify
    burn the punk hagiographies

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  4. #18
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    I wonder if you can even recognise the new when you're old. One pov is that you get old and you've seen it all before. But maybe you also get old and THINK you've seen it all before.

    After all, your brain literally, plastically changes as you age, and hardens, then decays. Would you know the new if it danced the Fortnite in front of you?*

    Then too there's the overwhelming question - is the new good? I wanted to raise this earlier, I read I can't remember where that the old myths were replaced in the 20th century by the new myth of modernity. Modernity is an ideal, an ever changing present. Progress and improvement are off the table but change is irrefutable.

    * Witness too the magnetism of conservatism to the ancient - protective of their money and their place in society and so on but also perhaps simply less psychologically open to change
    Last edited by Corpsey; 15-02-2019 at 02:53 PM.

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  6. #19

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    then maybe the music of the coming decade should be neither self consciously Novel, Not Possible Before Now (what someone here called 'diaspora conceptronica' or pc music is maybe a key example) nor self consciously retrophilic or hauntological in any way, but content itself with recombinations that are novel enough
    and not notice and not care if others notice like "this is something [some *relatively* obscure Psychedelic/Progressive/Electronic/Post-Punk concern] already did, and really excellent too by the way, YOU SHOULD CHECK THIS RECORD OUT AND READ THESE BOOKS"
    maybe they already know, maybe they don't but will, or maybe it doesn't matter because they're coming together to just release this sound, this mutual compulsion they have in music
    which reminds me it'd be neat if people in my age bracket got away from the solo electronic thing or the Meme Music Hyped By A Clique thing and started putting together bands again, but not rock bands, not a band with any necessary modifiers... you can have a band with people on laptops, cheap keyboards and drum boxes, crap student model guitars, with anything. and get away from what 'online localism' is doing to our fucking brains

  7. #20
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    It's interesting (is it?) I work in marketing and words are valued according to SEO. How searchable is this word? So now genre names are presumably more self applied than in the past, because you're in an online marketplace where you have to be searchable.

  8. #21
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    The question of modernism is what next?

    The question of postmodernism is what else?

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  10. #22
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    Now do we return to

    What for?

  11. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    I wonder if you can even recognise the new when you're old
    Thing is: novelty is ontologically nonsense. Its necessary condition being that what it claims as new, is different from all what is and hence that it is, what is not. Problem is that if that would be really the case, no novelty could ever be understood or recognised. The new can never be new, or it wouldn't be comprehensible. It should always carry the old along, as it were, to mark its difference. Style is a very clear indication of that, as usually styles only make sense when played out against a precedessor or a historical context and not as an absolute value.

    In that sense, longing for a next incarnation of the hardcore continuum and requiring it to be novel, might be quite frustrating and little fruitful. If anything, it's certainly a game of diminishing returns. At least for me. I think, one should look for counter-continuums, different modes of production and distribution, competing value systems, etc.

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  13. #24
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    It's funny

    Cos you get these pastiche jungle tunes now which do the opposite thing and drag in the new with the past

    Ruining it by making it sound "better"

    Imagine we return to olden times and live in huts but the huts have WiFi and Alexa

  14. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by other_life View Post
    then maybe the music of the coming decade should be neither self consciously Novel, Not Possible Before Now (what someone here called 'diaspora conceptronica' or pc music is maybe a key example) nor self consciously retrophilic or hauntological in any way, but content itself with recombinations that are novel enough
    and not notice and not care if others notice like "this is something [some *relatively* obscure Psychedelic/Progressive/Electronic/Post-Punk concern] already did, and really excellent too by the way, YOU SHOULD CHECK THIS RECORD OUT AND READ THESE BOOKS"
    maybe they already know, maybe they don't but will, or maybe it doesn't matter because they're coming together to just release this sound, this mutual compulsion they have in music
    which reminds me it'd be neat if people in my age bracket got away from the solo electronic thing or the Meme Music Hyped By A Clique thing and started putting together bands again, but not rock bands, not a band with any necessary modifiers... you can have a band with people on laptops, cheap keyboards and drum boxes, crap student model guitars, with anything. and get away from what 'online localism' is doing to our fucking brains
    I think you've just described Autechre.

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  16. #26
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    The title of this thread reminds me of a Richard Powers interview I posted somewhere on here a while back - https://www.yaleclimateconnections.o...the-overstory/

    Amy Brady: I was deeply moved by Nick’s story – his continuation of a project started by his grandfather, wherein every month he’d take a picture of a single tree. This story illustrates beautifully the idea that we can gain a wealth of knowledge about ourselves and nature by living on a single piece of land for a long length of time. Do you think Americans have lost anything by becoming more geographically mobile over the last century?

    Richard Powers: The causes of our estrangement from our “local habitation” may run even deeper than our runaway mobility. There’s something in the leveling tsunami of commodity individualism that works hard to make all places interchangeable. At the same time, we are migrating farther and farther into digital, virtual place. The stories we tell about ourselves are becoming increasingly place-independent. (The next time you read a piece of literary fiction, ask yourself how important it is to know where the story takes place.)

    Something in us wants to rationalize place, to master and manage it, to make all the vegetation grow in straight lines. Few people know their homes well enough to say whether the specific trees and plants surrounding them are natives or invasive. Think how far we’ve come from those times when an intimate knowledge of the local plant life was a matter of life and death. Acquiring tree consciousness, a precondition for learning how to live here on Earth, means learning what things grow and thrive here, independently of us. As Wendell Berry suggests in his poem, “In A Country Once Forested,” the soil remembers, even under the concrete. In certain very real, biological terms, that is literally true.

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  18. #27
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    Words that instantly turn me off, for some reason, I've realised today on here

    Chillwave
    Liminal
    Autechre

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  20. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Words that instantly turn me off, for some reason, I've realised today on here

    Autechre
    Is it just the word or do you dislike their music too?

  21. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    It was also literally just me you and corpse being brilliant and showing off for one another though. I loved it but would be good to get everyone wanting to play the same game.
    1) you're forgetting crowl

    2) that's not actually true. there were sprawling d beat conversations we'd never touch with a pole. there was a whole jim morrison thing i wasn't involved with. all sorts of rhtyhm stuff you weren't. you and eden had a whole thing about nuum mc's not being canonised in the same way dj's are. droid was integral to the danhceall autopsy. likewise benny and eden were central to feminine pressure. version did your favourite post on the nuum autopsy. blissblog was involved.


    what i'm saying is that all we need to do is the silver age, but in a way that doesn't piss people off. the dematerialisation thread was a very successful go at this.

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  23. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    It's interesting (is it?) I work in marketing and words are valued according to SEO. How searchable is this word? So now genre names are presumably more self applied than in the past, because you're in an online marketplace where you have to be searchable.
    Quote Originally Posted by received just now (& anonymised for pseudo-gdpr)
    Hi,

    This is probably the worng email address to write to but I've been on your website dissensus.com and on Linkedin, and couldn't find the right contact person.

    The coworker I am trying to reach is in charge of making product content - My guess would be that's the one in charge of maybe SEO or Marketing? Can you help me finding out who this is?

    The reason I am asking is that my company has developed a Software that automates content production with the use of AI and I want to understand better how it is done without such a tool.

    ---
    Steven J. M♽⚛⚚⚛⚚⚗l
    Head of Growth
    ⚚⚗⚝S⚚m♽⚧tics GmbH
    Stuttgart, Germany
    https://ab♽ut.⚚⚗-⚛⚧⚚♽.c♽m
    :confused emoji: but i can link you up

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