Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 91 to 105 of 105

Thread: Online (post-geographic) Localism.

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    4,077

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Some Reasons for hostility to drill

    Fall into apeing cultural economic military hegemon USA after a period of relative independence
    The most frustrating thing about drill is that it's called "drill". it has fuck all to do with american rap and if it was called something else i honestly don't think people would even make a connection; it would viewed relative to the hardcore continuum. the rhythmic language of the drums is all nuumy, the whole sound world it occupies is different from american rap, the flows are all different, even the bass sounds. i can't think of a time a genre's name has done so much damage to it's ability to receive accurate critical appraisal.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    1,342

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    The most frustrating thing about drill is that it's called "drill". it has fuck all to do with american rap and if it was called something else i honestly don't think people would even make a connection; it would viewed relative to the hardcore continuum. the rhythmic language of the drums is all nuumy, the whole sound world it occupies is different from american rap, the flows are all different, even the bass sounds. i can't think of a time a genre's name has done so much damage to it's ability to receive accurate critical appraisal.
    Didn't everyone hate the name 'grime' though?

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    19,774

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    The most frustrating thing about drill is that it's called "drill". it has fuck all to do with american rap and if it was called something else i honestly don't think people would even make a connection; it would viewed relative to the hardcore continuum. the rhythmic language of the drums is all nuumy, the whole sound world it occupies is different from american rap, the flows are all different, even the bass sounds. i can't think of a time a genre's name has done so much damage to it's ability to receive accurate critical appraisal.
    interesting thesis. Maybe you should write an essay about it?

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  5. #94
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    4,077

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Didn't everyone hate the name 'grime' though?
    yeah, i was going to say that everyone hates genre names, but though they might be embarrassing or inaccurate they don't actively harm people's assessment of the music in the same way 'drill' does. critics were able to asses grime for what it was, whereas with drill you've got the most pioneering, exciting music the uk's produced in 15 years but people see the name "drill" and dismiss it offhandedly as some bloke from peckham pretending to be from chicago.

  6. #95
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    4,077

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    interesting thesis. Maybe you should write an essay about it?
    apparently i've got to write so that people who haven't spent the last decade on dissensus can understand it. takes all the fun out of it. what do you mean 'tresillo' turns people off?! i can't cum unless someone says it during sex!

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to sadmanbarty For This Useful Post:


  8. #96
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    19,774

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    apparently i've got to write so that people who haven't spent the last decade on dissensus can understand it. takes all the fun out of it. what do you mean 'tresillo' turns people off?! i can't cum unless someone says it during sex!
    If I were you I would fight tooth and nail for that tresilio. Or forego fame and fortune and just write it for us.

  9. #97
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    19,774

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    yeah, i was going to say that everyone hates genre names, but though they might be embarrassing or inaccurate they don't actively harm people's assessment of the music in the same way 'drill' does. critics were able to asses grime for what it was, whereas with drill you've got the most pioneering, exciting music the uk's produced in 15 years but people see the name "drill" and dismiss it offhandedly as some bloke from peckham pretending to be from chicago.

  10. #98
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    4,077

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    there's a video of a little baby faced digga d being brought to some award show as one of so solid's guests

  11. #99
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    19,774

    Default

    I was mostly just using it as generic example of what preceded drill and the associations drill carries as a result tbh but at the same time it is nuts

  12. #100
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,953

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    yeah, i was going to say that everyone hates genre names, but though they might be embarrassing or inaccurate they don't actively harm people's assessment of the music in the same way 'drill' does. critics were able to asses grime for what it was, whereas with drill you've got the most pioneering, exciting music the uk's produced in 15 years but people see the name "drill" and dismiss it offhandedly as some bloke from peckham pretending to be from chicago.

    Well it's not that pioneering in *the nuum lineage* no real vocal science, no bass science, no shattered glass sounds, no techy textures, is my point. like you seem to be wanting to slot drill into nuum even though nuum was dead by 07 anyway. You can say it's pioneering in terms of UK rap but that's a different story. It's a conservative regression to the song form in terms of a hardcore continuum context, but it is probably a progressive (maybe even revolutionary) development in UK rap.
    Last edited by thirdform; 17-02-2019 at 11:19 PM.

  13. #101
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,953

    Default

    put it this way im not let into most clubs, regardless of genre. so I never held that one dancefloor belief. What I'm more into is the idea of hearing tunes out and going yeah that's bad, that is like vibing with how i feel in london, which is maybe around 2010 i made a bit of a culturally ill judged foray into industrial techno. But deep tech was not really bad. some of it is alright was listening to strange static again but it's not bad. It's quite static (ha)

  14. #102
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,953

    Default

    I mean I guess the question we need to ask is how do we realise a truly collective internet? How many times have you gotten into ill judged online wars because both of you have misjudged each other? I really feel the gravity of this on twitter and fb.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to thirdform For This Useful Post:


  16. #103
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    لندورا
    Posts
    3,111

    Default Three Decades of Cross-Cultural Utopianism in British Music Writing The history of

    Three Decades of Cross-Cultural Utopianism in British Music Writing

    The history of Englandís fertile music press reveals as much about the opinionated English youth who created it as it does the music they covered in the second half of the 20th century

    Mark Sinker
    Has anyone got through this yet?
    https://longreads.com/2019/02/19/thr...music-writing/
    it seems fascinating but tbh i keep nodding off or getting distracted (& this is just an excerpt)

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to sufi For This Useful Post:


  18. #104
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    لندورا
    Posts
    3,111

    Default

    sorry for my attention span.

    If i gathered right, and the central thesis is that pop has been a sort of sanctuary for impure thoughts rejected by wider culture, then i like it,

    (and it's maybe relevant here ?)

    - up close, it's a bit like a music journalism family tree
    i probably should ffwd to the era when i remember those magazines

  19. #105
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    لندورا
    Posts
    3,111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sufi View Post
    (and it's maybe relevant here ?)
    or maybe it was this one i was thinking of The Trap and The Escape. http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=14454

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •