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Thread: Online (post-geographic) Localism.

  1. #1
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    Default Online (post-geographic) Localism.

    If we were to use this virtual space to create our own music genre that would represent an online and post-geographic localism. Where's other-life?

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    My prejudice is that good music doesn't get made through conceptualism, but I guess some music I love (GAS springs to mind) is conceptual, so perhaps I'm way off.

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    I like the idea of dissensus actually creating something mind you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    My prejudice is that good music doesn't get made through conceptualism, but I guess some music I love (GAS springs to mind) is conceptual, so perhaps I'm way off.
    I agree but a) I never said it would be good
    B) never said it would be conceptual.

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    What dissensus should be able to create, but for the most part can't, is intelligent,imaginative and passionate conversation. This is what I find very very upsetting. There is a commitment of time given but not of energy or of risk.

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    Music that was reflective of the internet would be schizophrenic, associational, allusive, referential, unable to fix on a single idea or identity, and yet simultaneously repetitive, circuitous, aimless, joyful and joyless, posturingly nihilistic, posturingly idealistic

    I foresee a dark future of features in The Wire, music fawned over by bearded men with goldsmiths degrees, tote bags filled with dissensi tube socks
    Last edited by Corpsey; 15-02-2019 at 12:08 PM.

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  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    What dissensus should be able to create, but for the most part can't, is intelligent,imaginative and passionate conversation. This is what I find very very upsetting. There is a commitment of time given but not of energy or of risk.
    Is it because we're (by and large) english?

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    What dissensus should be able to create, but for the most part can't, is intelligent,imaginative and passionate conversation.
    The silver age of dissensus was intelligent, imaginative and passionate, but arguably died because of the forum's post-geographic nature.

    London's sense of humour, it's conversational speed, etc. were the motors behind the silver age and you can see that, with some exceptions, the further a away a user was from London, the more alienated they were by the silver age.

  10. #9
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    Should music reflect the world or improve it

    Be a mirror to it or a portal out of it

    On this I note that Pound acted as a scolding flame on two visionaries, Yeats and Eliot, reorientating them towards the real.
    Last edited by Corpsey; 15-02-2019 at 01:02 PM.

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    I like that there's a thread for new music now, even though I don't like most of the music in it

    That must exist, but there needs to be threads for loftier ideals cos otherwise there isn't much to talk about really

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    The silver age of dissensus was intelligent, imaginative and passionate, but arguably died because of the forum's post-geographic nature.

    London's sense of humour, it's conversational speed, etc. were the motors behind the silver age and you can see that, with some exceptions, the further a away a user was from London, the more alienated they were by the silver age.
    We're being post-geographic now, haven't you heard?

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    as I do occasionally, I've been scanning the radio 1 playlist to get a bead on the popular pulse, and I find to my disgust that the popular pulse is STILL that dancehall-derived beat that was the popular pulse about three years ago

    i've liked a lot of songs built on that beat, don't get me wrong, but

    TO THEORISE:
    it's a sort of post-geographic beat, a beat for bougie liberalism/multiculturalism, an unthreatening evocation of exotic hedonic locations, a regimented corporate hipster death-march, with swing in its hips, apparent diversions, actual uniformity

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    the popular pulse is STILL that dancehall-derived beat that was the popular pulse about three years ago
    this one?

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    who still talks about *night bus*?
    although i guess 'convertible to yokohama' ended up feeding into vaporwave and the general fascination with city pop and japanese Clean Ambient, boon for youtube's recommendation algorithms

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    (as an example of 'online localism' from hipinion)

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