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Thread: RIP Keith Flint, The Prodigy.

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    Sad about this, the Prodigy were one of the first "bands" I ever was obsessed with, and I really got onboard with the Keith-led Firestarter and Breathe.

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    The formative band for me. Completely entwined in growing up and everything since.

    Smiled on reading today that in these days of 'Berlin based' and when many peers have moved to exotic places, Keith was living in Essex to this day. What a scene that town produced in the 90s

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    largely missed the boat on them, as I imagine most people in the states did. they eventually got somewhat popular here, but it was much later and even then nowhere near as big as they were in the UK. they must have been pretty wild when they were coming up.

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    I remember mocking them when they first appeared - I was 12 I think and still into metal. Strange how goofy and innocent those videos look now. Big impact was in 94 with 'no good', which had heavy rotation on MTV. Memories of camping trip down to Brittas Bay and a day on acid wanting to strangle a mate of mine who played the album on a loop for at least 6 hours. He's gone now as well.

    Came back to 'experience' a couple of years later when I was getting into DJng jungle and realised there was a record with some jungle on it I could pick up in any HMV, and its the record that stands up best I think. Plenty of reasons to criticise the Prodigy but they opened doors for a lot of people and made a living out of it, which was more than most managed, and you wouldn't begrudge them any of their success. Flint became a kind of archetypal figure through it all, a living symbol of lost and delirious nights and many mangled dawns.

    RIP.
    Last edited by droid; 05-03-2019 at 10:49 AM.

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    Some interesting stuff in here (I've listened to the first hour).

    I saw the Prodigy at Exit Festival in 2007 and it was terrifying. HUGE crowd, lots of pushing and shoving and trampling going on, somebody had to be carried out, etc.

    Was reading comments on another forum and apparently they were/are huge in Russia for some reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by droid View Post
    I remember mocking them when they first appeared - I was 12 I think and still into metal.
    From the gruniad CiF

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    I remember, with fondness, the way the Prodigy brought people together. There aren't many better ways to praise a musician than to say that their music did that! At 6th form college around 1992, the rockers and the ravers really didn't mix well.

    Different clothes, music, drink, drugs and different parties.

    The ravers had their side of the common room, we had ours and a cold war was fought for control of the stereo. Then The Prodigy and Rage Against The Machine broke and for the first time, we had music that EVERYBODY liked. Overnight, we could actually be at the same parties and over time, we realised that the ravers weren't complete jerks after all.

    RIP Keith Flint, sleep soundly knowing that you did that!

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    and yet todays band trying to bring people together in rock music is .. sleaford mods. of all people.

    RIP Keith, you nutter. for ages i didn't listen to them because you know when you discover noise factory and Kemet Crew that opens out huge avenues for going back through all musics past and present (not a diss of prodigy btw.) but had to put on experience on again last night. took me right back to when i was 11/12. so much freedom and utopian potential. fizzy sugary sweets and all. didn't realise I'd be so sad about it as well, my dad was being a cunt yesterday and i couldn't take it and slept for the whole day and was upset all night.

    Everyone from happy hardcore kids to post-punks on my news feed mourning em, black brown n white. Some boys in grime can still say they're running tings. yeah alright. you had the chance to be the british music of the 2000s but then you squandered it. Marcus Nasty should have shot all of u when he had the chance.

    Rest in Power Keith mate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    From the gruniad CiF

    Coverly
    I remember, with fondness, the way the Prodigy brought people together. There aren't many better ways to praise a musician than to say that their music did that! At 6th form college around 1992, the rockers and the ravers really didn't mix well.

    Different clothes, music, drink, drugs and different parties.

    The ravers had their side of the common room, we had ours and a cold war was fought for control of the stereo. Then The Prodigy and Rage Against The Machine broke and for the first time, we had music that EVERYBODY liked. Overnight, we could actually be at the same parties and over time, we realised that the ravers weren't complete jerks after all.

    RIP Keith Flint, sleep soundly knowing that you did that!
    That's actually a reasonable point - they were one of the few artists I'd say had common appeal at my high school among The Punks, The Townies and The Others (indie-kids, basically).

    I'd always thought The Prodigy was sort of taboo around these parts because of their obvious 'rockism' as a live band and the very un-Dissensian rock-rave direction they went in from the latter 90s onwards, but I'm sure you'd be hard-pressed to find anyone here who doesn't rate their first two albums and early singles, which are pretty much unimpeachable examples of idiot-teenager energy, to coin a phrase.

    Poor bugger.
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    nah the thing about fat of the land is yeah its rock and big beat or whatever but it's essentially hip hop beats. it's not like some people in dnb crowding their tracks with over the top synth flourishes or whatever.

    Dance punk for the 90s generation. i can rate that.

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    I remember him most in this video which I saw on a Saturday morning and thought, wow he dances really well for a guy with such long hair! My ambition from then was to dance as well as him. Firetstarter stuff didn’t impress me anything as much as this.


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    As much as anything itís a time to reflect on the sheer joy of good rave dancing which had a Northern Soul style to it.

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    fuck off ollie a rave isn't a rave unless its got guns in it to shoot bouncer cops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    fuck off ollie a rave isn't a rave unless its got guns in it to shoot bouncer cops.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 08-03-2019 at 05:22 PM.
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