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Thread: Read Serious Poetry with me & Corpsey

  1. #76
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    Sorry for the endless questions but

    Would you say there are certain qualities that you look for in poetry that you find in those 10 poets? You once wrote on here that you despise Larkin. I wonder if there is a definition you have either consciously or not in your mind when deciding if poetry is good or bad, or if it's just a case of reading a poem like you'd listen to a song...

  2. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Do you read Baudelaire in French?
    No, and I almost didn't include him for that reason, but if Luke can have Rimbaud and Rilke, then I get at least one French poet, surely?

  3. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Have you ever read the divine comedy?
    I slogged through Peter Dale's translation of Inferno a long time ago, and hated it, literally could not go any further.

    I have the Allen Mandelbaum translation on my shelf, which I have dipped into and looks much better. I am looking forward to reading all of it, although that may not happen until next year.

  4. #79

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    Well, they are all very different poets, but there is definitely an emphasis on form, and unusual rhythmic, lyrical and syntactic effects. I have an aversion to the Romantics, as you can probably see, I don't care about the poem being a vehicle for someone's feelings or their amazing mind or personality. I like the use of language to convey and express moments, ideas or emotions in precise or surprising ways. There's an inherent difficulty and obliqueness to it. Sometimes sense is lost to sound, which can have its own new and invigorating effects and meanings (Hopkins, Loy). I like the idea of poems being either functional (Jonson's epigrams, Donne) or superficial/joyful (Frank O'Hara's 'I do this, I do that' rambles, Cummings) or beyond conventional norms (Loy, Pound, Cummings). I like the Tradition and the inherent narrative of its development and supersession - the seeds of self-destruction inherent in it. This doesn't explain why I loathe Larkin, at all, I realise.

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  6. #80

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    There's a certain sensibility I would have to think more about, it might be illuminating (personally).

  7. #81

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    Deadly serious aesthetic and intellectual purpose is crucial - even when being silly or drifting, like O'Hara. No pomposity, windiness, flabbiness. No regurgitation of form in a safe, domestic context.

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  9. #82

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    A vivid, experimental, uninhibited, technical exploitation of words and poetic tools to clarify and/or illuminate the world.

  10. #83

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    No didacticism. No Tony Harrison shit.

  11. #84

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    I don't know, it's hard to explain exactly.

  12. #85

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    You're almost asking me to write a manifesto on poetry again.

  13. #86
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    What about Milton?

    Deadly serious, crammed with poetic effect, highly didactic.

  14. #87

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    I don't have strong opinions on Milton, but then I have't read Paradise Lost since, I don't know, 1998? I didn't hate it.

  15. #88
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    Came across some brilliant Coleridge quotations on Milton last night, including:

    In the Paradise Lost indeed in every one of his poems it is Milton himself whom you see; his Satan, his Adam, his Raphael, almost his Eve all are John Milton; and it is a sense of this intense egotism that gives me the greatest pleasure in reading Milton's works. The egotism of such a man is a revelation of spirit.

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  17. #89

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    Well, yes, the Romantics loved him.

  18. #90
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    Pick a poem, Craner, any poem, and break it down for me - why is it good?

    Then pick another poem, Craner, any poem, and break it down for me - why is it bad?

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