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Thread: Kyrgyzstan

  1. #16
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    How difficult is it just on a practical level? And do you have to eat mutton? I'm a life long vegetarian

  2. #17
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    I wrote a poem about Central Asia for a customer the other day and she said it amazing it really captured it and that she is an anthropologist based in Japan but always out on the Chinese borders here to the west she gave me her card and said to get in touch I've sort of got a bee in my bonnet about that bit of the world atm

  3. #18
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    She said I was amazing and brilliant

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I've sort of got a bee in my bonnet about that bit of the world atm
    I have a kind of fascination with that east meets west/Europe meets Asia bit - Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan and I guess Turkey too. Not that I have really done anything to act on it yet. I just love the vistas and feel and the music you get in Paradjanov films and anything else that reminds me of them.


  5. #20
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    I do know that there are a lot of names we probably tend to think of as generically Russian but which actually can tell you about someone's origin. Armenian names usually end in -ian like Gagosian or Kardashian, Georgian names tend to end in -ili, if someone's name ends in -ko then their ancestors are more likely to be from Ukraine eg Shevchenko, Rothko etc not sure about Azerbaijan though or Kyrgyz for that matter. I think there is a Tartar style or styles though.
    Last edited by IdleRich; 23-05-2019 at 01:11 AM.

  6. #21
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    Though it's made more complicated cos they often russify their names like Kasparov/Kasparian or Paradjanov whatever he was originally called.

  7. #22
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    Great thread
    Look what they're building in Bishkek now
    https://twitter.com/amalieskram/stat...83763331932164

    Baku looks pretty good
    https://twitter.com/amalieskram/stat...85546968162304
    Last edited by HMGovt; 23-05-2019 at 09:24 AM.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    How difficult is it just on a practical level? And do you have to eat mutton? I'm a life long vegetarian
    Practically it's pretty easy - everything's connected by a surprisingly effective system of semi-scheduled minibuses called marshrutkas, and there's enough tourism, at least in the places that we looked at going, that you can find places to stay and to eat without much trouble. Picking up very basic tourist Russian helps a lot.

    My girlfriend is veggie and got along okay - there's a lot of meat in the food, but stuff's normally prepared on the spot and restaurants seem to have no problems leaving it out. Might be a bit harder if you do a lot of homestays or if you're scrupulous about checking what sort of stock they've used or whatever.

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  10. #24
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    Practically it's pretty easy - everything's connected by a surprisingly effective system of semi-scheduled minibuses called marshrutkas
    Ah they have this in Chelyabinsk where my girlfriend is from. The public transport system there kinda collapsed and was replaced by this private minibus network run by (I think) Armenians. For me it's a fantastic system cos there are hundreds and hundreds of routes going all through the city, they're really fast and you never have to wait more than about two minutes at a stop to go somewhere (admittedly not always where you planned). And it costs like 3p. My girlfriend sees them as a representation of the collapsed system but I see them as maybe the best bus service I've ever known.

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