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Thread: The other 90's

  1. #61
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    I bought Definitely Maybe a short while after it came out. Urban Hymns too. The singles were everywhere, absolutely unavoidable. I liked the psychier bits of the Verve. Never learned to play Wonderwall properly, but sang it over the chords to Glory Box instead, as a kind of joke which went down well enough at the time.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by pattycakes_ View Post
    Blair's Labour used Oasis' Live Forever as their campaign anthem.
    I thought it was D:Ream, Things Can Only Get Better.

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  4. #63
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    The early-2000s mostly passed me by as I had small children at the time. Much later on my other half got me into Missy and Aaliyah and I had to admit I'd been seriously missing out.

  5. #64
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    and then there's...


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  7. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slothrop View Post
    But this sort of thing tends to turn into a bit of a no-true-scotsman argument.
    Yeah, that's fair - the likes of Sleeper obviously fall into that category. I just don't think there was that many Scotsmen. What indie bands had, largely for the first time, was the possibility of being A or B playlisted on Radio 1 and having a Top 10 hit - and then having a successful album for the car driving crowd if you didn't do anything too outlandish - I mean even The Verve dialled it the fuck down for Urban Hymns.

    Some of them definitely fancied a bit of that and got with the program. It's understandable.

    Didn't Mansun go from being fairly basic Britpop to full-psych?
    Interestingly, they got a much better drummer who took a lot of persuading to join them as he thought they played 'Britpop shite'. But I think they clearly were trying to reach beyond that...again sometimes one's grasp exceeds one's reach. Also they fail the 'reacting to the 80s' test pretty clearly - they were essentially Tears For Fears.

    By the millenium the charts were dominated by acts like Britney Spears, Darude, the Bomfunk MCs and Craig David.
    Tbf it's not like 'Britpop/Noelrock/Post-Britpop' acts ever really dominated the charts, it was a noticeable presence in terms of first-week sales but the dominance is certainly easy to exaggerate. Oasis never held the No. 1 spot for more than a week - they had one real hit; Wonderwall. Rest of their stuff went in and out of the Top 10 pretty quickly. Bands like Travis and Coldplay were there in the millenium, and Blur were still getting in the Top 10.

    I like Haddaway as much as anyone but there was plenty of pop music and pop-dance for that matter in the Britpop period. 'Some Might Say' by Oasis was knocked off No. 1 by Livin' Joy. And I remember one of the MM journos celebrating that very fact next issue.
    Last edited by comelately; 04-06-2019 at 06:22 PM.

  8. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    I wanted to post a Groove Armada track but I hate them so much I don't know the names of any of their songs.
    This has been on regular rotation at The Gym Group now for some time.


  9. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    I thought it was D:Ream, Things Can Only Get Better.
    Ah yeah, you're right. There was a weird connection between oasis and Labour though. They had Noel and a bunch of other hip 90s celebs over to number 10 and Tony apparently had one of oasis' discs on the wall.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...et-526457.html

    Feel like they used Live Forever for some video montage of something at some point though. Man, that Cool Brittania was some dumb shit.
    Took a rest stop that wasn't on the schedule

  10. #68
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    Yeah Noel joined the likes of Eddie Izzard, Mick Hucknall and Piers Morgan at a No. 10 shindig


  11. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    grime presented a far more english blackness than the rest of nuum stuff or road rap/drill.

    the demographics of east london at a very particular point in history.
    I've said this before to Luke i think. I do mourn the death of the Turkish hackney-er or dalston-er. one of my aunts lives in Latonstone and she's pretty much from that generation. the community is too dispersed now though. even Turks in Surrey, and Chiswick of all places.
    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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  13. #70
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  14. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    what's interesting about some of the absolute worst stuff from the 90's was that it was informed by the same cultural inputs as the best stuff.

    trip hop, down tempo, illbient, etc. were on paper not a million miles away from the nuum, but somehow something went terribly wrong for all of them.
    I'm too lazy to read through this whole thread, but (and I know defending trip-hop is hardly the cool thing to do) I don't agree with this. Sure, some (a lot?) of this stuff was terrible, but there were numerous gems along the way. Basically the stuff that was instrumental hip-hop with mad samples could be a lot of fun. IMO, the biggest issue with trip-hop was the editing - a lot of it was simply too long. Most of these tracks revolved around one or two ideas, so six / seven minute tracks (common on the albums) were just way too much. It's not like these were functional dancefloor tracks - with more judicious editing a lot of this stuff could have been chopped down to 3 or 4 minutes, which would have solved a lot of the core structural problems with trip-hop. Look at the first couple DJ Krush albums - short tracks, great albums. So much of the rest of this genre suffered from decent ideas bloating out way past their ideal end point.

    Clearly, it all sounds really dated now, because anything vaguely hip-hop-oriented from before the Long March of the Autotune sounds dated now.

    Also, to be honest, trip-hop's bad reputation is at least partly down to James Lavelle committing the greatest of English sins, namely taking himself very seriously.

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