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Thread: Say something clever

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by poetix View Post
    I often think about Larkin's line about the sexual revolution - that "everything became / a brilliant breaking of the bank, / a quite unloseable game" - in reference to occasions of unexpected ease, all obstacles surmounted, success leading inexorably to success. Of course Larkin was imagining the way it must be for other people, and largely imagining it wrong: the game stayed the game, even if certain players found themselves unexpectedly turbocharged and lubricated.
    But in that poem, Larkin then imagines the previous generation envying him and his lot for not having to believe in God and the church. Which of course was also wrong, given the profound sense of melancholy and despair the death of God has left us with. I think with that observation he's ironising his (or his persona's) belief in "a quite unloseable game". And then, of course, comes the desolation (?) of the endlessness beyond high windows.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Something I realised in the archeological museum in
    Athens is that the V for Vendetta mask gains its power
    From what is known as 'the archaic smile' the characteristic
    smile worn by the oldest Greek statues, before the 'severe
    style' wiped the smirk from their faces.

    This smile is also the smile worn by the heirophant
    In crowleys Thoth tarot deck.

    "
    It is the aeon of Horus, of the Child. Though the face of the Hierophant appears benignant and smiling, and the child himself seems glad with wanton innocence, it is hard to deny that in the expression of the initiator is something mysterious, even sinister. He seems to be enjoying a very secret joke at somebody's expense. There is a distinctly sadistic aspect to this card;

    "
    Can you show pictures of this archaic smile?

    What's the idea, that the Gods were sadistic?

    I think this is how the Greeks saw them. (And ofc "as flies to wanton boys are we to the gods"...)
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  3. #33
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    I don't think it has anything to do with the gods being sadisitc.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaic_smile

  4. #34
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    https://tarotx.net/tarot-card-meanin...ant-thoth.html

    I think I know the exact the stone face this card is modelled from in the British Museum.

  5. #35
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    "rd to deny that in the expression of the initiator is something mysterious, even sinister."

    that's what made me think of sadistic gods

    but I can see now that they all look as jolly as father christmas

    The V mask doesn't look jolly it looks like it's going to stab you in a stairwell
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  6. #36
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    I was in a bar the other afternoon and this was playing



    And it made me feel that the postmodern, at birth, is America. Everything is set dressing, everything is quotation, because ripped from context, torn from history, from place, and planted there. Hollywood studios in which you walk from African jungle to Venice canal to Mexcan ziggurat.

    And that now we are also Americans.

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  8. #37
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    thought that was quite clever but then I realized that you just nicked it from a Rammstein chorus.


  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    But in that poem, Larkin then imagines the previous generation envying him and his lot for not having to believe in God and the church. Which of course was also wrong, given the profound sense of melancholy and despair the death of God has left us with. I think with that observation he's ironising his (or his persona's) belief in "a quite unloseable game". And then, of course, comes the desolation (?) of the endlessness beyond high windows.
    Mixed up poems here, woops
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Something I realised in the archeological museum in
    Athens is that the V for Vendetta mask gains its power
    From what is known as 'the archaic smile' the characteristic
    smile worn by the oldest Greek statues, before the 'severe
    style' wiped the smirk from their faces.
    The letter V itself is really important in Pynchon. It's two divergent paths originating from a single point, an eye looking up, the tip of a falling rocket, Venus, The Virgin and probably a few other things too. The character in V for Vendetta reads V. at one point as well.

    CGwCLThXAAAW4vA.jpg

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