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Thread: Cultural Theory Greatest Hits

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    What does useful mean? I don't know this word!
    Well I think Gilroy has helped me understand the world.

    D&G are essentially wafty nonsense that is a lot of fun but it's hard to quantify exactly what it's for which is also cool. It is basically bonkers pomo marxist psychoanalytical poetry that takes you into a different space.

    There is also poetry in what Gilroy does though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    what is d&g?
    Dolce & Gabbana.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    what is d&g?
    one of those rubbish mike paradinas jungle spin off genres.
    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I don't understand any of this btw. Not at all. Understanding has never been my strong point. But I do sometimes enjoy reading bits here and there. Lefebvre has a book called rhythmanalysis which should be made for Barty but I'm not convinced it's that good.
    Well I think, like me, you understand some of it. But also like me you lack that confidence to bullshit about this stuff that the philosophy blogger set had in spades.

    I think part of that comes from having mates who will take the piss out of you when you go off on one, which is a mixed blessing but probably ultimately good.

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  7. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post
    Well I think, like me, you understand some of it. But also like me you lack that confidence to bullshit about this stuff that the philosophy blogger set had in spades.

    I think part of that comes from having mates who will take the piss out of you when you go off on one, which is a mixed blessing but probably ultimately good.
    "Grounding"

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  9. #21
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    I find a lot of it consists of inserting the phrase "... as ... " with no real explanation because it sounds cool as it is: text as fortress, currency as exoskeleton and so on.

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  11. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    currency as exoskeleton.
    did you make that up?
    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

  12. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    did you make that up?
    Yeah, I made both of them up.

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  14. #24
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    it should be a real one. it's a goodun
    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

  15. #25
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    Baudrillard wrote about 50 books (i've not counted but that's what feels like). Yet - and this is just a hunch - I suspect the kernel of most everything is contained in this short essay, "The Ecstasy of Communication"
    http://criticaltheoryindex.org/asset...munication.pdf
    Which must have been written in the late 70s or early 80s but in a feat of unintentional prophecy explains the internet and its effect on culture and psychology.

    One of JB's books in that highly fetish-able Semiotexte Foreign Agents series of black pocket-sized volumes was titled Forget Foucault - which always tickled me, the French-crit-theory equivalent of a diss track.

    But I could never forget Michel Foucault - the prose is arid next to Barthes, but the ideas have so many applications.

    The History of Sexuality Vol. 1 is not a sexy read, but it rearranged my mind - put out of contention, out of their misery, all those lingering Sixties ideas about Eros as inherently revolutionary.

    The Archaelogy of Knowledge is a grim slog right up until the final chapter which is styled as a dialogue between ice-veined Michel and an imaginary humanist interlocutor whose objections are patiently remorselessly demolished. It ends with a wonderful flourish of chilling anti-humanist rhetoric. I struggled resolutely through the whole thing during my lunch breaks while working a summer job in a factory, packing aerosols of fly-spray, and the final chapter felt like the pay-off.

    He was a much better interviewee than a writer and the anthology of dialogues Power / Knowledge is a very good way in.
    Last edited by blissblogger; 28-06-2019 at 04:53 PM.

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  17. #26
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    I have read some really interesting books in the last decade or so - things that have sent me down unexpected thought-paths - but they tend to be more like obscure scholarly works, things that have slipped out of the discourse - as opposed to "Cultural Theory", or the kind of stuff that is setting the pace in academia nowadays.

    Nothing hits you quite as hard as when you're young and mind-malleable and so for me it would be the French lot. It also seemed to work really well with what was going in music at that time, or at least it was irresistible for me to glom one onto the other, and there seemed to be a fit, or a friction that created sparks.

    Strangely though, much as I love all that French stuff still, it doesn't seem to have much explanatory power, any resonance or purchase on current popular culture.

    I'm not sure what does, on the theory front - who are the useful thinkers of recent times when it comes to music etc?

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  19. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by blissblogger View Post
    who are the useful thinkers of recent times when it comes to music etc?
    Look in the mirror. Also a few decent ones on www.dissensus.com
    Took a rest stop that wasn't on the schedule

  20. #28
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    Yeah at the risk of turning this into a creepthread I would say Retromania was pretty key for where music is at now.

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    Can't believe it's almost 10 years old
    Took a rest stop that wasn't on the schedule

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    I remember Simonís description of coming off this stuff as like being a lapsed Catholic. It somehow always stays in you, directing your thought patterns, however far you get away from it.

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