Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 106

Thread: Cultural Theory Greatest Hits

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    18,153

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    I find a lot of it consists of inserting the phrase "... as ... " with no real explanation because it sounds cool as it is: text as fortress, currency as exoskeleton and so on.
    Another biggie is "Becoming".
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    855

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blissblogger View Post
    Strangely though, much as I love all that French stuff still, it doesn't seem to have much explanatory power, any resonance or purchase on current popular culture.
    You'd think as a pretentious nerd with a French degree I'd be well up on this stuff. But I'm not. Don't understand a word of it.

    What's it for? Maybe Luke is right

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    18,153

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by woops View Post
    You'd think as a pretentious nerd with a French degree I'd be well up on this stuff. But I'm not. Don't understand a word of it.

    What's it for? Maybe Luke is right
    Understanding is overrated and for squares.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    9,157

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    I find a lot of it consists of inserting the phrase "... as ... " with no real explanation because it sounds cool as it is: text as fortress, currency as exoskeleton and so on.
    dissensus as compound

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to baboon2004 For This Useful Post:


  6. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    922

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pattycakes_ View Post
    Look in the mirror. Also a few decent ones on www.dissensus.com
    Well that's nice of you to say, but what I meant was - theorists and philosophers and critical thinkers who don't actually write about music, but their concepts open it up in interesting ways, or can be repurposed by the likes of us.

    The Barthes stuff about jouissance etc seemed to have loads of uses and applications at that time. (Also Barthes did actually write about music, he was passionate about it... in particular "The Grain of the Voice" was, and maybe still is, very fruitful - although AutoTune, because it interferes with the grain by putting something in between the body and the vocal output as it reaches the listener's ear complicates that...).

    Bataille similarly, and Kristeva.

    And then Deleuze & Guattari, and Virilio, seemed to have a lot of potential - particularly with rave culture.

    Then you had your Donna Haraways and so forth.

    But that is over 25 years ago.

    Not sure who or what are the reigning or upcoming figures or zones within current critical theory - Badiou and Zizek have been established names for a long time now, and I never noticed much use being made of them in terms of popular or underground music.

    Is queer theory and radical gender theory still the cutting edge zone?

    I guess Robin James of It's Her Factory is probably at the cutting edge of applying these ideas to music, and to very bang up to date, mainstream music too.

    I did this thing on my website back at the end of the Nineties called the Rave Theory Tool Kit, it was a half-jokey half-serious collection of all these left over quotes I'd gathered and typed out, things that seemed to have applications to music but I'd never found a place to put them. Some going back as far as Nietzsche but mostly the French crit crew and then 90s cybertheory types like Arthur Kroker.

    I wonder if I was to do it again, what names could be added to the litany?

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    922

    Default

    incidentally i've been interviewing a bunch of conceptronica artists for a piece, people like Lee Gamble and Chino Amobi - people who are very enthusiastic about theory, ravenous autodidacts in an endearing way - and the names that came up in their conversation were mostly long established ones - Deleuze & Guattari... Baudrillard .... the CCRU came up surprisingly often... Mark Fisher came up, he seems to have made the List, as it were, in a big way

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    I dunno how much influence any of them have, but I often see people like Reza Negarestani, Benjamin H. Bratton and Robin Mackay come up in relation to people like Florian Hecker, Holly Herndon and Lee Gamble.

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by poetix View Post
    Nowadays people spoil it a bit by saying "of course Baudrillard acknowledged that bombs were dropped, people died etc, he was just saying that 'the Gulf War' was largely a media spectacle, and what really happened was a rather one-sided succession of applications of US firepower", but this is a bit pacifying - the argument is that our entire social apparatus for grasping and representing reality now deals wholly in simulacra, so the issue is less "what really happened" versus the media image, and more the fact that what really happened, happened to a large extent for and in the media. "Smart bombs" were detonated, and filmed detonating, as much for the sake of the image of their detonation as for the tactical effects of blowing up whatever and whoever they were being used to blow up...
    This is a great start and demonstrates good understanding of what Barty wants (I.e don't spoil it don't deflate) A*.
    Can we have some more please? Barty hasn't read a book since he was 14 so it's vital we encourage him here.

  10. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    This is where I want to see people's nurturing, paternal side and also their Inspirational teacher dead poets society side.

  11. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

  12. #41

    Default

    Baudrillard, Foucault, D&G - in that order

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to vimothy For This Useful Post:


  14. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    592

    Default

    I've recently enjoyed the forensic architecture stuff a lot. Just a different way of thinking about things. The bomb clouds made solid and the idea of mapping shrapnel in 3d. The narrative of conflict. Incorporating lots of big ideas but presented in a readable way. 'Mengeles skull' by eyal Weizman and another guy is prob the best intro. Quick Google should get you the pdf. I actually read the big book published by zone first. Zone books are an interesting publisher btw.

    Can also recommend 'applied ballardianism' by Simon sellars. Interesting and easy read, not too pretentious and a strong narrative arc. From him I got a virilio book as a tip but found it largely incomprehensible.

    I did also get 'anti-oedipus' but found it unreadable unless I was really in the mood and happy to spend an hour on a chapter. Also tried 'cyclonopedia' and found it good at first but it got a bit much and then I forgot about it. I've tried bataille as well, never really stuck.

    Going back to the semiotexte things tho, I thought 'i love dick' by Chris kraus was excellent, tho dint like 'torpor' as much.

  15. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    This is both grim and fascinating:

    The Art of War - https://frieze.com/article/art-war

    The attack conducted by units of the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) on the city of Nablus in April 2002 was described by its commander, Brigadier-General Aviv Kokhavi, as ‘inverse geometry’, which he explained as ‘the reorganization of the urban syntax by means of a series of micro-tactical actions’.1 During the battle soldiers moved within the city across hundreds of metres of ‘overground tunnels’ carved out through a dense and contiguous urban structure. Although several thousand soldiers and Palestinian guerrillas were manoeuvring simultaneously in the city, they were so ‘saturated’ into the urban fabric that very few would have been visible from the air. Furthermore, they used none of the city’s streets, roads, alleys or courtyards, or any of the external doors, internal stairwells and windows, but moved horizontally through walls and vertically through holes blasted in ceilings and floors. This form of movement, described by the military as ‘infestation’, seeks to redefine inside as outside, and domestic interiors as thoroughfares. The IDF’s strategy of ‘walking through walls’ involves a conception of the city as not just the site but also the very medium of warfare – a flexible, almost liquid medium that is forever contingent and in flux.
    Contemporary military theorists are now busy re-conceptualizing the urban domain. At stake are the underlying concepts, assumptions and principles that determine military strategies and tactics. The vast intellectual field that geographer Stephen Graham has called an international ‘shadow world’ of military urban research institutes and training centres that have been established to rethink military operations in cities could be understood as somewhat similar to the international matrix of élite architectural academies. However, according to urban theorist Simon Marvin, the military-architectural ‘shadow world’ is currently generating more intense and well-funded urban research programmes than all these university programmes put together, and is certainly aware of the avant-garde urban research conducted in architectural institutions, especially as regards Third World and African cities. There is a considerable overlap among the theoretical texts considered essential by military academies and architectural schools. Indeed, the reading lists of contemporary military institutions include works from around 1968 (with a special emphasis on the writings of Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari and Guy Debord), as well as more contemporary writings on urbanism, psychology, cybernetics, post-colonial and post-Structuralist theory. If, as some writers claim, the space for criticality has withered away in late 20th-century capitalist culture, it seems now to have found a place to flourish in the military.

  16. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    لندورا
    Posts
    3,438

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    This is both grim and fascinating:

    The Art of War - https://frieze.com/article/art-war
    rings a bell http://www.dissensus.com/showthread....verse+geometry
    Last edited by sufi; 02-07-2019 at 11:54 PM.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to sufi For This Useful Post:


  18. #45

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by catalog View Post
    I did also get 'anti-oedipus' but found it unreadable unless I was really in the mood and happy to spend an hour on a chapter.
    quickest way into D&G is via de landa, 1000 years of nonlinear history

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to vimothy For This Useful Post:


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •