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Thread: Corpsey's metropolitan museum of art desk calendar

  1. #31
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    Particularly like the fact that he never painted from nature. He just imagined things, like we all used to when we were chiddlers.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  2. #32
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    Kitsch or not this is crazy mad skillz painting



    Joséphine-Éléonore-Marie-Pauline de Galard de Brassac de Béarn (1825–1860), Princesse de Broglie,1851–53
    Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres French


    Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, the neo-classical French artist par excellence, painted this masterpiece toward the end of his life when his reputation as a portraitist to prominent citizens and Orléanist aristocrats had been long established. Pauline de Broglie sat for the artist’s final commission. Ingres captures the shy reserve of his subject while illuminating through seamless brushwork the material quality of her many fine attributes: her rich blue satin and lace ball gown, the gold embroidered shawl, and silk damask chair, together with finely tooled jewels of pearl, enamel, and gold. The portrait was commissioned by the sitter’s husband, Albert de Broglie, a few years after their ill-fated marriage. Pauline was stricken with tuberculosis soon after completion of the exquisite portrait, leaving five sons and a grieving husband. Through Albert’s lifetime, it was draped in fabric on the walls of the family residence. The portrait remained in the de Broglie family until shortly before Robert Lehman acquired it.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
    Fancied himself as a violinist. He had the rare misfortune of becoming more famous for his painting than his music.

  4. #34
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    His mad portrait of Napoleon is a goodun

    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

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  6. #35
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    Napoleon's madness.

    Like he asked him to paint him in a sailor suit and brimmed hat holding a huge lollipop.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  7. #36
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    WINSLOW HOMER, "Eagle Head, Manchester, Massachusetts" (1870)

    Just wanted to post this because I've noticed how well Homer paints waves. There's something very tangible and solid about them, the way he paints them - like they could slap you in the face.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  8. #37
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    Napoleon looks like the man who's been pulling 18 hour shifts in the kebab shop opposite for the 5 or 6 years I've been living here. I've been watching him gradually turn from living human into fat, pasty, haggard ghoul. Terrible really. Work destroys people.

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