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Thread: john eden's top 100 cyberpunk rasta lps of all times

  1. #76
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    No worries mate, I totally get that but not everyone would...

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    And juke from the future. Couldnt be a better start.

    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post


    1. Steve Reich - Come Out (1966)

    The first dub techno track. Composed of a vocal sample of Harlem rioter Daniel Hamm.

    Also I believe the first time a member of the Five Percent Nation / Nation of Gods and Earths would appear on a record.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post
    This might take a while.
    well excited about this

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    R-3011537-1357479923-7214.jpeg.jpg

    2. Various Artists - MLK Dub (1999)

    This snuck out under the radar at the time and a few people completely lost their shit. One of those people was Russ D of The Disciples who wrote a great review of it on his website (an incredible niche resource). I rang up Dub Vendor and ordered a copy over the phone and probably spoke to Russ' brother Lol Bell-Brown.

    There were an avalanche of classic 70s dub reissues around this time and you could feel its presence everywhere. But this was Jamaica claiming Dub back with definitive yard style mixing in full digital spectrum. The yearning that only comes from knowing that whole swathes of the track have been subtracted but remain as a ghostly subliminal presence. Ethereal female backing vocals, rasta percussion and snatches of the top roots vocalists of the day. Bass that fills a room even at normal volume. Absolutely an album on its own terms - these are different mixes from the ones you would find on the b-sides of the original songs.

    Not everyone will get it, but some of us are still evangelical about it 20 years later. Final Call: the last great dub LP to come out of Jamaica.


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    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post
    R-3011537-1357479923-7214.jpeg.jpg

    2. Various Artists - MLK Dub (1999)

    This snuck out under the radar at the time and a few people completely lost their shit. One of those people was Russ D of The Disciples who wrote a great review of it on his website (an incredible niche resource). I rang up Dub Vendor and ordered a copy over the phone and probably spoke to Russ' brother Lol Bell-Brown.

    There were an avalanche of classic 70s dub reissues around this time and you could feel its presence everywhere. But this was Jamaica claiming Dub back with definitive yard style mixing in full digital spectrum. The yearning that only comes from knowing that whole swathes of the track have been subtracted but remain as a ghostly subliminal presence. Ethereal female backing vocals, rasta percussion and snatches of the top roots vocalists of the day. Bass that fills a room even at normal volume. Absolutely an album on its own terms - these are different mixes from the ones you would find on the b-sides of the original songs.

    Not everyone will get it, but some of us are still evangelical about it 20 years later. Final Call: the last great dub LP to come out of Jamaica.

    very nice indeed. there was a period round 94 when lots of dancehall tunes were sampling dub - just the first example that springs to mind:


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    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    It says bless the lads and it means bless the lads.
    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    i don't know, probably some marxist cultural theory or something
    https://manifestacionesoterica.bandcamp.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew View Post
    there was a period round 94 when lots of dancehall tunes were sampling dub
    lots of these tunes

    from the mykal roze onwards

    looking farward to updates here

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    3. Various Artists - Leaders of the Pack: The Very Best of the 60's Girls (2004)

    It's hard now to describe the long shadow cast by the sixties when you grew up in the seventies. Our memories have been tainted by endless retrospectives. For example there wasn't actually very much homegrown children's TV - just a few hours a day. And a lot of that was tediously educational. But what there was, was a lot of reruns of US shows from the 60s. Batman, Star Trek, The Addams Family, Man From U.N.C.L.E., Space 1999, Hanna and Barbera cartoons. These all seemed incredibly sophisticated and stylish. And they all featured young women who were witty, intelligent, resourceful and either excitingly bad or inspiringly good. Plus they all had incredible hair, eye make-up and... legs. And were multi-racial.

    So on the radio - and sometimes in films and on the TV - you'd hear these amazing pop smashers with female singers that I'd associate with the TV characters. Songs with a sad sweetness that would stab you in your face. I can now understand these recordings as one of the peaks of human creativity and capitalist production values (in a good way). A voraciously promiscuous appetite for influences drawn from the blues, jazz, symphonies, soul, folk, psychedelia, protest music, ballads, easy listening, ska, bossa nova, you name it.

    This music absolutely seeped into my DNA and it's why I like Girls Aloud and Bananarama and Shampoo and Misteeq and Mel & Kim. It's where the Blogariddims "Office Party Mix" came from - and my defence of Stock Aitken Waterman against Serious Music Men.

    This particular comp is a cypher for a hundred other CDs you can probably buy in motorway service stations everywhere. I especially like it because it has just the right amount of completely obvious tunes that everyone's granny dances to at weddings, plus some more demented curveballs.



    Last edited by john eden; 27-07-2019 at 02:42 PM.

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    4. Colin Dale's Outer Limits (1994)

    Colins Dale and Faver would always be on at weird times on Kiss FM and my consumption of this stuff was very unspotterish and not systematic. It was always great when you'd tune in and find them though. Dale always had a way of mixing it up that I liked, he wasn't scared of slightly experimental industrial/EBM type tunes (not the noise/harsh stuff). I couldn't tell you if I ever saw him DJ - there were lots of places like Tribal Gathering where a gang of us followed the sounds and who was playing was impossible to know. It took me years to realise he was black.

    I'd always filed this CD under Techno but apparently bits of it are now seen as Trance. Which I'm actually OK with - that was a big thing for me and my friends for a while, even the Goa stuff. But tunes like these conjure up memories of a time before Trance became the cliched white-dreadlocks cod-mystical bullshit though:





    All the cliches about early mornings on industrial estates, the concrete glowing, watching the sunrise. That hoodie you've dragged around all night suddenly being the absolutely best thing you own. Talking bollocks, the working week obliterated.

    And this CD has other shades of techno futurism too. This one is made of a load of bleeps and sound effects from Star Trek:



    It speaks of a time where Carl Craig and Luke Slater could rub up against EBM artists and Serious-Ambient-Composer Peter Namlook. It wasn't about a subgenre defining the exact bpm and direction of travel, it was freer than that. And Colin Dale had the vision and the skill to navigate the landscape like a Jedi on the surface of the Death Star.

    Tellingly I've never delved into other tracks by any of the obscure artists on this comp. For me it will always exist as a complete piece of its own, played nodding into a cup of tea very early in the morning or very late at night.

    Melancholia and optimism in equal measure. Bliss.
    Last edited by john eden; 28-07-2019 at 06:01 PM.

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  21. #87
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    Thirdform is gonna send me to the techno saltmines for rehabilitating trance.

    That's the kind of thing that would trigger 3 days of rage on UK-Dance too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post
    Thirdform is gonna send me to the techno saltmines for rehabilitating trance.

    That's the kind of thing that would trigger 3 days of rage on UK-Dance too.
    lol. I am actually quite the devotee of faver/dale's early 90s, me and steph spoke about it a bit in 2014-15. trance as a descriptor rather than a genre always seemed apt to me. i always look for panicking in the club shot in the back trance.



    the trance I'm really against is all that leftfield shit.



    horrible, just horrible.

    I have that outer limits cd. you know i might actually put it on now. this book on turkish secularism though, is 500 pages!
    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post
    Thirdform is gonna send me to the techno saltmines for rehabilitating trance.

    That's the kind of thing that would trigger 3 days of rage on UK-Dance too.

    lol. tbh trance does link to oldskool hardcore in some ways so that's always a danger of nuum fundamentalism.

    banging!

    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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    in fact one of my favourite acid tunes could technically be considered a trance track.

    labworks put out some great, dark hard acidic trance.

    shame the sasha and digweed massive aswell as the public school goa numpties decided to lay claim to that term. revolting professional managerial class people.

    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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