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Thread: The Cocoon

  1. #31
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    I meant first time meetings. The initial contact. There's no doubt there's problems with communication online. I'm not arguing that it's an upgrade, just that there are certain advantages, or at least points of difference which do not necessarily involve a loss. I'm committed to real life. I do my thing in real life. I talk to strangers every day. You just don't want another modern life is rubbish thread cos it gets a bit one note. This conversation is potentially more interesting than that.

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  3. #32
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    I've mentioned this before but I think one interesting fork in the road is what happens when the shops disappear. We're crossed a threshold. People will still consume needless to say but consumer spending is no longer the main driver of the world economy. The internet is forcing 'bricks and mortar' shops out of business.

    There's an opportunity, potentially, for a reclamation of public space. Shopping is a tragically degraded use of it in any case. Could there be a way to repurpose it for something which involved interaction and shared projects etc. Almost certainly not... but who knows

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  5. #33
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    There was that US cunt who came to Whitechapel to goggle at the locals, interpreted a sign prohibiting public boozing as evidence that they'd managed to impose Sharia law. Hilarious really. Whitechapel's an absurdly civilised part of London these days.

  6. #34
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    when retailers have difficulty selling products, they pivot and sell experiences. instead of a current boring brick and mortar store selling widgets and gadgets, you'll get immersive environments where you experience the products in some sort of an enticing, advanced or luxurious setting, connectivity of technologies on display to demonstrate their fullest capacity. you don't just see racks of trainers, you experience what it's like to compete one-on-one versus a Michael Jordan hologram on a simulated basketball court at the five-story Niketown.

    similarly, locals transform into listening bars.

  7. #35
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    Sure and escape rooms are the most visible manifestation of that. But still. We'll see.

  8. #36
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    this cocooned shut-in thing already happened in Japan didn't, decades ago, they had a word for it, i can't remember - it was a whole phenomenon, young men completely cut off, spending all day playing video games

    Baudrillard talked about the home of the future as being like a satellite - connected to the world by streams of telemetry - TV, etc etc

    Actually Borges, prescient fucker that he was, imagined something like this in his 1949 fable "The Aleph" - on the connected man of the future, "I picture him in his study, as though in the watchtower of a great city, surrounded by telephones, telegraphs, phonographs, the latest in radio-telephone and motion-picture and magic-lantern equipment, and glossaries and calendars and timetables and bulletins.”

    i think the positive way of looking way at some of this would be say that it's a new form of postgeographical socialising - intensified in some areas (intellection, potential for acrimony), diminished in others (face to face, haptic, getting drunk, base-level civility restraints where you're in someone's presence )

    perhaps we should all drink while posting on Dissensus

    (maybe some of us are)

    actually writing something at the moment about the changing notion of the neighbourhood, how your neighbours are determined by taste, sensibility, interests, politics etc, and they're not living next door, they're living... well, somewhere like this

    that's why i started addressing my blog readers as "parishioners"
    Last edited by blissblogger; 20-09-2019 at 06:21 PM.

  9. #37
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    I don't think barty is saying the urge to shut yourself away is new more that society is facilitating it as never before and consequently it's become the norm, or path of least resistance.

  10. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by blissblogger View Post

    actually writing something at the moment about the changing notion of the neighbourhood, how your neighbours are determined by taste, sensibility, interests, politics etc, and they're not living next door, they're living... well, somewhere like this
    the tories have a 'northern strategy' at the moment (that they also attempted in 2017) in which they use the post-brexit, culture war-ification of british politics to gain seats in labours ostensibly socially conservative northern heartlands. elections no longer based on regionalism, but rather social values.

  11. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by blissblogger View Post
    this cocooned shut-in thing already happened in Japan didn't, decades ago, they had a word for it, i can't remember - it was a whole phenomenon, young men completely cut off, spending all day playing video games
    Otaku

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  13. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    the tories have a 'northern strategy' at the moment (that they also attempted in 2017) in which they use the post-brexit, culture war-ification of british politics to gain seats in labours ostensibly socially conservative northern heartlands. elections no longer based on regionalism, but rather social values.
    This is Bartys great fear; the Great British Culture Wars.

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  15. #41
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    it worked here:

    In American politics, the Southern strategy was a Republican Party electoral strategy to increase political support among white voters in the South by appealing to racism against African Americans.[1][2][3] As the civil rights movement and dismantling of Jim Crow laws in the 1950s and 1960s visibly deepened existing racial tensions in much of the Southern United States, Republican politicians such as presidential candidate Richard Nixon and Senator Barry Goldwater developed strategies that successfully contributed to the political realignment of many white, conservative voters in the South who had traditionally supported the Democratic Party rather than the Republican Party. It also helped to push the Republican Party much more to the right.[4]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_strategy

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    mohammad, moses, buddha and nietzche (and his zarathustra) all had to go and isolate themselves from society to attain wisdom. they often go to caves which invites comparisons to the 'man caves' this thread is about.
    Robert the Bruce

    According to a legend, at some point while he was on the run after the 1305 Battle of Methven, Bruce hid in a cave where he observed a spider spinning a web, trying to make a connection from one area of the cave's roof to another. It tried and failed twice, but began again and succeeded on the third attempt. Inspired by this, Bruce returned to inflict a series of defeats on the English, thus winning him more supporters and eventual victory. The story serves to illustrate the maxim: "if at first you don't succeed, try try try again." Other versions have Bruce in a small house watching the spider try to make its connection between two roof beams.[46]

    This legend first appears in a much later account, Tales of a Grandfather by Sir Walter Scott (published between 1828 and 1830).[106] This may have originally been told about his companion-in-arms Sir James Douglas (the "Black Douglas"), who had spent time hiding out in caves within his manor of Lintalee, which was then occupied by the English. The entire account may in fact be a version of a literary trope used in royal biographical writing. A similar story is told, for example, in Jewish sources about King David, in Polish accounts about Bruce's contemporary Władysław I the Elbow-High[107], and in Persian folklore about the Mongolian warlord Tamerlane and an ant.[

  17. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Funnily enough Marvin locked himself in a caravan in Belgium and wanked himself into psychosis.
    I thought that was Stephen Fry?

  18. #44
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    I find communicating online feels like attaining several extra spider like limbs, like Dr. Octopus or the Boiler Geezer in Spirited Away. You've got words but you're also able to pull in images, video, audio and all sorts to make up for the lack of body language and tone of voice. It's like your mouth sealing itself shut as a bunch of antennas and tendrils sprout from your head.

    tumblr_inline_myp2spVcyQ1sohk3w.gif

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  20. #45
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    Wall-E's depiction of the trajectory of humanity seems quite likely to me.


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