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Thread: Disruption.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    globalisation is all about removing disruption. disruption is at times an almost consciously symbolic attack on globalisation

    the lasting legacy of 9/11 to most westerners is disrupted air travel.

    the fear for manufacturers after brexit is disrupted supply chains.

    disruption at calais and the irish boarder.
    Obvious but globalisation was also disruption, upheaval, the systematic erasure of whole sections of Britains economy

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Obvious but globalisation was also disruption, upheaval, the systematic erasure of whole sections of Britains economy
    the north-east and london. two radio signals interfering. mutually exclusive interests.

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  4. #33
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    The rhetoric is often self serving but the principle I don't necessarily object to. Often you just have two cartels going to war. For instance black cab drivers vs uber.

  5. #34
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    system vs personality.

    roland smith had a clever thing saying that the eu is more a set of rules than it is a political entity and as such it's inflexible because it operates like a system rather than a more conventional, malleable political entity.

    he points out that eurosceptics realised this (and thus became eurosceptic), but have then forgotten it when trying to deal with the eu and are thus trying to operate politically (negotiate with individual member states, boris' optimism, threats, showing your serious about no deal) even though the eu inherently can't do so.

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    system vs personality.

    roland smith had a clever thing saying that the eu is more a set of rules than it is a political entity and as such it's inflexible because it operates like a system rather than a more conventional, malleable political entity.

    he points out that eurosceptics realised this (and thus became eurosceptic), but have then forgotten it when trying to deal with the eu and are thus trying to operate politically (negotiate with individual member states, boris' optimism, threats, showing your serious about no deal) even though the eu inherently can't do so.
    Googled Ronald Smith

    Roland Smith
    @rolandmcs
    Eurosceptic argument - as it was - held together rather well around a single unifying idea: that the UK could not historically, culturally, spiritually, politically go where the EU is heading....to (crudely) "a country called Europe".

    Thread.... /1
    http://www.dissensus.com/showthread....477#post394477

  7. #36
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    The Internet is the great disruptor.

    And not only DDOS attacks.

    It turned everything upsidedown.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  8. #37
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    I read Shevek less as a trickster figure - he doesn't have in any sense the "force of personality", the unpredictable charisma, the untethered eros - and more as a figure of rathere austere autistic disconnection, almost egoless or at least without a strong social selfhood. He has no sense whatsoever of rank or clout. This is what enables him to move between social systems, almost equally inassimilable to both Anarres and Urras. Although a doctrinally committed Odonian, he doesn't actually have an Odonian "spirit" - his form of commitment, to the limit-point of an idea, breaks with any mutualist conception of how knowledge is created or for whom.

    Another SF narrative about an individual who acts as a wildcard within their society is Arthur C. Clarke's The City And The Stars, which I always loved.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poetix View Post
    I read Shevek less as a trickster figure - he doesn't have in any sense the "force of personality", the unpredictable charisma, the untethered eros - and more as a figure of rathere austere autistic disconnection, almost egoless or at least without a strong social selfhood. He has no sense whatsoever of rank or clout. This is what enables him to move between social systems, almost equally inassimilable to both Anarres and Urras. Although a doctrinally committed Odonian, he doesn't actually have an Odonian "spirit" - his form of commitment, to the limit-point of an idea, breaks with any mutualist conception of how knowledge is created or for whom.

    Another SF narrative about an individual who acts as a wildcard within their society is Arthur C. Clarke's The City And The Stars, which I always loved.
    None of the people named are tricksters. Quite the opposite.

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    They disrupt by dint of who they are. this is what I notice you said either 'nerds' or autistics (I've forgotten which) do to society at large. Disrupt by their very nature rather than by intent.

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  12. #40
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    luka's boy Heath Ledger's Joker was a disruptor.

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    thing theory

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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    luka's boy Heath Ledger's Joker was a disruptor.
    Nolan's batman films all flirt with this theme, especially in "The Dark Knight Rises" where the disruptors want to bring down capitalist society, including megarich oligarchs like bruce wayne.

    But of course he portrayed this as just a cynical power grab by covert reactionaries - which actually I suppose you could say was prescient, given the disruption we've seen from the Right over the last five years in particular.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

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    Henri Ducard: Tomorrow the world will watch in horror as its greatest city destroys itself. The movement back to harmony will be unstoppable this time.
    Bruce Wayne: You attacked Gotham before?
    Henri Ducard: Of course. Over the ages, our weapons have grown more sophisticated. With Gotham, we tried a new one: Economics.

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    Sean Connery's barbarian in Zardoz is clearly not a nerd, but he is an interloper - fairly explicitly in this case a figure of class mobility.

  17. #45
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    this thread is the yin to this one's yang in some respects:

    http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=14890

    on the other hand, the political disruption we see (and the way it's a form of entertainment to many) speaks to the need for surrogate unpredictability in our increasingly predictable lives.

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