Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 27 of 27

Thread: A Future of Leaseholders

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    that's it i think yes. it is a way of delaying these build-in flaws that are inherent to capitalism. but you can't rise property prices for ever right? this too will have some saturation point?

    actually, i saw thirdform tweeting something about it yesterday, referencing this:

    Dzl5hutWwAAi_MA.jpg

    but then what happens once the whole world is incorporated, if every market has been opened and every country has followed the same process the proto-capitalist countries have underwent?

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to yyaldrin For This Useful Post:


  3. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17,859

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I was working on a document that had a deadline (as many students and workers would be) and that really brought home how pernicious the whole thing was
    Open Office has an awful lot going for it. The interfaces are a bit clunky compared to the equivalent Microsoft programs but you don't have to put up with any of that crap (or buy it in the first place, for that matter).
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    25,653

    Default

    I don't even have a computer any more but when I can afford a new one I'll bear that in mind

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    25,653

    Default

    Read UBIK I reckon. Or read it again.

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17,859

    Default

    Sounds interesting, might put it on my to-read list.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    4,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Well that's what they say. You reach saturation point. Everyone has a tv, a fridge, a phone, a home computer, a microwave, a vcr, a car, and then your economy goes into speculation mode, money making money. This is one reason why countries like China have those kind of growth rates because not everyone there has a cheese toastie machine yet. I think that's how it goes?
    Jameson goes on about some bloke called Arrighi who said as much.

    We have had to wait for a remarkable book by Giovanni Arrighi, The Long Twentieth Century, for a brand-new theory of finance capitalism which completely rewrites our picture of the stages of capitalism itself. Arrighi begins with a remark of the great world historian Fernand Braudel: “Every capitalist development of this order seems, by reaching the stage of financial expansion, to have in some sense announced its maturity: it is a sign of autumn.”3 The yellow leaves of capitalism are apparent when a specific market has been saturated: production slows down, there is no longer any burning need for refrigerators, automobiles, personal computers, there is no expansion possible in the area of production in general; and at that point financial speculation must begin and profits be made in this higher-level or more abstract fashion, capitalism now as it were profiting from itself and speculating on itself, feeding on itself, by way of the stock market and its allied institutions. Arrighi’s insight in fact proposes a three-stage theory of evolution, first a specific market is opened and colonized; then the great moment of production saturates it; and finally, in some third autumnal stage, finance capital sets in and takes over a stagnating economy.

    But this account must be supplemented by a geographical one, in which the emergence of capitalism is mapped and charted by a systematic displacement and enlargement of its centers: from Genoa and the Italian city-states to Spain, from Spain to Holland, Holland to England, and thence ultimately to the United States. Each of these stopping points runs through the entire cycle of the three stages before capital, having exhausted its financial moment, takes flight and moves on to greater possibilities elsewhere. We are now, in the United States, obviously in our financial stage, the stage of speculation of all kinds; and we must, with Arrighi, remain uncertain as to what will follow once that stage is exhausted. (But Chinese production and the immense Chinese market cast a suggestive shadow on the longer future.)


  8. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    4,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    I think you have to differentiate between digital resources with one off or limited uses and essentials like housing.
    It's definitely most concerning when it comes to stuff like housing, but I think it's a clear trend in general and I don't think it's a great development for either category.

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    4,950

    Default

    Why American Farmers Are Hacking Their Tractors With Ukrainian Firmware

    To avoid the draconian locks that John Deere puts on the tractors they buy, farmers throughout America's heartland have started hacking their equipment with firmware that's cracked in Eastern Europe and traded on invite-only, paid online forums.

    Tractor hacking is growing increasingly popular because John Deere and other manufacturers have made it impossible to perform "unauthorized" repair on farm equipment, which farmers see as an attack on their sovereignty and quite possibly an existential threat to their livelihood if their tractor breaks at an inopportune time.

    "When crunch time comes and we break down, chances are we don't have time to wait for a dealership employee to show up and fix it," Danny Kluthe, a hog farmer in Nebraska, told his state legislature earlier this month. "Most all the new equipment [requires] a download [to fix]."
    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/x...inian-firmware

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to version For This Useful Post:


  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    4,950

    Default

    It reads like The Onion, but apparently it's legit. William Gibson eat your heart out.

    "What you've got is technicians running around here with cracked Ukrainian John Deere software that they bought off the black market"

  12. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to version For This Useful Post:


  13. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    25,653

    Default

    Serfdom to corporate overlords. That future. What sci-fi does that? Must be a tonne.

  14. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,566

    Default

    uber/lyft is a variation on the concept: pay-per-use as opposed to monthly fee for unlimited access, and alleviates the need for some people to buy a car and have to pay car loans, insurance, gas, repairs/maintenance, etc.

  15. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    4,950

    Default

    Those ATMs that charge you. Pisstake.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •