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Thread: Corpsey's Ascetic November.

  1. #31
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    The disgust and contempt I feel for his obsession with his mother, forgetting my own mum obsession when I was a kid, and how natural and understandable that was, so that the contempt I now feel for it is probably something like cauterisation of a wound
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

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  3. #32
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    I was having a think about that too. Trying to remember a time when that might of been true for me. I have virtually no childhood memories.

  4. #33
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    I just read the first transportingly beautiful bit

    When he describes how the staircase which he watched his father's candle flame travel up has now been demolished, and says he can now hear the childhood sobs that have always been there, because now it's quiet enough, as when the hubub of the city fades and you can hear the vespers which have been ringing all day.

    Something like that.

    What strikes me immediately is how strange it is. In this translation its written in this very 19th century prose, but the way it's structured is so strange, completely atypical for a novel. It's sort of Victorian modernist...
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I was having a think about that too. Trying to remember a time when that might of been true for me. I have virtually no childhood memories.
    Me neither, or at least none that come easily to mind.

    I've found if you start to consciously rummage around in there you can start pulling out all sorts of long dormant flotsam. An easy example of dormant memories - when you hear the theme tune to a cartoon you watched a lot when you were a kid, and you instantly remember the program that you'd completely obliterated from your conscious mind.

    Anyway, that overwhelming all encompassing love for your mother - I think that is nearly universal (allowing for those with absent mothers, or cruel mothers, etc.). And of being protected by your mother for so long against the cruelty of life, the cruelty of time and death.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  6. #35
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    It's the ideal book for Corpsey. Can't believe I didn't think of it sooner. I would have been reading it too but I was too busy smoking weed drinking rum and watching pornos

  7. #36
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    Joke, joke, I'm on the strait and narrow, I'm right there with you, hand in hand

  8. #37
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    Trying to resist a big lump of lovely hash I've just been given.

    Since this is a translation, the beauty of it isn't to be found so much in the language as in the observations and juxtapositions, the metaphor that can survive translation.

    I'm sure if you can read French the beauty is in the language too. But that's life innit
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  9. #38
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  10. #39
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    Maybe beauty is a stained befouled word
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  11. #40
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    Third would probably call it bourgeois. I think it's redeemable, in part. It's tricky.

  12. #41
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    Its also a vague word, a substitute for being more specific.

    Did I mean that it was beautiful because it made me feel all gooey?

    It surprised me, this sudden shift from the "immediate" to the retrospective, and the use of a sensory metaphor to get at something emotional. You can see he's obsessed with the senses, with perception and with consciousness, but what's really striking is how he intertwines that with emotion - he describes a moonlit landscape with a sort of scientific aesthetic precision, then compares hearing the sounds very clearly and quietly to a concert, but then it becomes about the SPECIFIC concerts that Swann took the narrator's family to, in a single sentence.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  13. #42
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    You don't need to read it, they are serialising it on Radio 4 right now.

  14. #43
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    1572810793037-1483769350.jpg

    I suppose it makes sense for the most famous part of the book to come early on before even the laziest readers have given up.

  15. #44
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    I'm very very tired. I think I might have picked up corpseys disease. What symptons did you have corpse?

  16. #45
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    Headache throat ache heavy fatigue cold etc.

    Didn't read any Proust today. Write off.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

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