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Thread: Self-Transformation & Build A Better You.

  1. #76
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    Do you not think the kpunk self improvement programme could be characterised in that way? it's a cult of intensity.

  2. #77
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    It's the stuff I like best. The spinoza by way of Burroughs programme for self transformation.

  3. #78
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    For me being a poet is basically about being an adolescent forever. If I ever grow up I'll write a novel.

  4. #79
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    Totally - fandom as opposed to grey vampirism, the thrill of feeling that Bryan Ferry or the new Terminator film could ignite transcendent passions in you, lift you from your slump, launch you beyond yourself.

  5. #80
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    A wrinkle, though: the Spinoza-via-Burroughs program is "cold rationalism". A contradiction I don't think he ever worked out. He wasn't a cold person, but he sometimes seemed to want to be. An utter ruthlessness would come over him sometimes. You could almost see him marking off the names - "you're dead to me, you're dead to me..."

  6. #81

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    Craner wants to be a European, chic, sexy, glamourous so I can understand why he regards Larkin with horror.
    What do you mean, wants to be?

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  8. #82
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    Craner is a European, chic, sexy, glamourous so I can understand why he regards Larkin with horror.

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  10. #83
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    Louche, urbane, an espresso drinker.

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    Sipping a Spritz Veneziano and reading Colette with espadrilles on my manicured feet.

  12. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by poetix View Post
    Totally - fandom as opposed to grey vampirism, the thrill of feeling that Bryan Ferry or the new Terminator film could ignite transcendent passions in you, lift you from your slump, launch you beyond yourself.
    I don't think I have suffered from depression, i might be wrong, but I don't think so but what I did used to do was launch into these periods, maybe a month, six weeks, of very heavy skunk smoking which were in many ways analogous to depression and emerging from them was like emerging from a period of depression. It was like being reborn and you'd be replete with this fairly wild, ragged energy. Manic really.

  13. #86
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    Lulls and fallow periods are common in life, I think, especially creative life. That feeling of being re-energised on coming out of one is often a bit deranging. I don't know how much the self-improvement racket can really impact on this either way. I'm suspicious of any scheme that offers a vision of you at your most effective all the time, because that seems like a path to burn-out to me.

    The story people like Adam Phillips tell about boredom is that without the childish ability to be bored - inert, and frustrated within our inertia - we can't find new objects of fascinated absorption. But is a long skunk-slump frustrating, or just becalmed, anaesthetised? Is there a dissatisfaction building within it that must eventually come to a head?

  14. #87
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    Yeah well obviously the boring answer is it's a balance you have to know how hard you can ride yourself when to crack the whip and dig in the spurs, when to ease off on the reins

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    The other thing I'll answer later this evening because I have to remember what it was like.

  16. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Yeah well obviously the boring answer is it's a balance you have to know how hard you can ride yourself when to crack the whip and dig in the spurs, when to ease off on the reins
    This is dad advice though. Not appropriate for an adolescent cult of intensity.

  17. #90
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    A lot of actual adolescence is very boring. Like life in the trenches: boredom punctuated by terror. David Mitchell's Black Swan Green really gets the flavour of this. Each chapter ends with some horrible crisis blooming, then the next chapter begins and it's as if it never happened.

    I think cults of intensity tend to be based on emotion recollected in tranquility: you remember the bits where everything's fizzing and popping, and want to recapture that feeling, but the feeling itself couldn't exist if it weren't contingent and precarious, you can't lock it up in a temple and expect to be warmed every time you visit by the Holy Flame.

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