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Thread: The Lost Futures Thread

  1. #1
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    Default The Lost Futures Thread

    I was thinking about this after eden crucial post about Dub's lost future http://www.dissensus.com/showthread....098#post386098

    what happened there? there were some artists who seemed to just do electro synth dub, or sort of aba-shanti type dedicated sound system dub, but the whole dub version culture just dwindled away
    like it collided with the future, it didn't really make it through when electronic music happened during the 90's

    or did i just lose track?
    in which case hit me up!

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  3. #2
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    droid btw wtf?

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    "Itís more of a thing that I tap into when I want to. When I listen to an old tune it doesnít make me think ĎIím looking back, listening to another era.í Some of those tunes are sad because they sounded like the future back then and no one noticed. They still sound future to me."

    "I donít know if it exists any more at all. A lot of those old tunes I put on at night and hear something in the tune that makes me feel sad, - a few of my favourite producers and DJs are dead now too - and I hear this hope in all those old tracks, trying to unite the UK, but they couldn't, because the UK was changing in a different direction, away from us. Maybe the feeling of the UK in clubs and stuff back then, it wasn't as artificial , self-aware or created by the internet. It was more rumour, underground folklore. No mobile phones back then. Anyone could go into the night and they had to seek it out. Because you could see it in people, you could see it in their eyes. Those ravers were at the edge at their lives, they werenít running ahead or falling behind, they were just right there and the tunes meant everything. In the 90s you could feel that it had been taken away from them. In club culture, it all became like super-clubs, magazines, trance, commercialized. All these designer bars would be trying to be like clubs. It all got just taken. So it just went militant, underground from that point. That era is gone, now there's less danger, less sacrifice, less journey to find something. You can't hide, the media clocks everything."

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    The term itself is pretty interesting as you have to be in possession of something in order to lose it. We had to have these futures within our grasp in order for them to be torn away. It gets me wondering which futures are or were never in our hands to begin with.

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    What's that quote about the future being a pact between the dead and those yet to be born?

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    By definition the future can't really arrive. It ceases to be the future if does.

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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    By definition the future can't really arrive. It ceases to be the future if does.
    this is what I've been trying to say all along on this bord but people seem to take umbrage with it. the thing is the hardcore continuum was basically the 50s-70s windrush generations music, for a past that was lived. todays music is basically the music of the 90s techno utopians. xanax on tap, pint of tindr, bit of okcupid, home delivery. it's what the cybernetic people wanted and then some, but because their critiques of consumer society were formulated in the 70s-early 80s, they still had to approach the acid house revolution as their novel ideas being realised, rather than them just catching up to the technological capabilities. a truly future music, well, it would have to be divorced from all referents entirely. the concrete guys tried to do this but you can hear the themes of classical composition and that education still being there. futurism has always been an imaginary because the species productive capabilities always moves faster than its consciousness at any given point. put it this way, we don't make the world we live in for ourselves, we set our children into motion and shuffle off this mortal coil. by the time our real impact is felt in the world, we have spent our wages and been buried in our graveyards (I mean literally dead not metaphorically.) Today I am not the change I want to be but living in the existence unconsciously determined for me by the previous generation. this is unavoidable.
    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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    for me 90s eurotrance is not very futuristic. because I have a different imaginary of futurism. futurism is many times associated with flashy sparkling synthesis or a kind of bladerunner dystopianism. but what about if futurism to someone is ultra-pulsating electricity, the body being forced to move outside of its psychic confines. cognitive obliteration through magnetic stimulation.
    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I respect islamists

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    i very much liked luka's line on that other contentious thread about our current anxiety being caused by the shadow of the future falling over us
    (but what is the light behind it?)

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    this is what us lot always willed uk funky to become, but it never did. it remained a one man genre. funkystepz 'for u' was the only real imitator.

    it'd have been great if there'd been whole swathe of these tracks with angular rhythms and can't-really-tell-what-it-is sounds.

    also that slow attack on it was very prescient; we went from the staccato of hardcore the this proto-dematerialised smooth, boardelress timbre.

    in a way drill was what dissensus was hoping uk funky would become. it's essentially uk funky rhythms, but darker with nuumatic bass science and mc's over the top. and like those apple tracks it has the mournful, slow attack sounds on the top.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post


    this is what us lot always willed uk funky to become, but it never did.
    In an alternative universe this is a grime producer making a Broken Beats track that got rinsed at Co-op.

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