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Thread: Don DeLillo

  1. #16
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    Have a load of posts been deleted?

    Weirding me out.

    Anyway, came in here to say that I've been listening to Delillo reading from Cosmopolis and surprised to learn he sounds a bit like Richie Aprile



    Last edited by Corpsey; 25-03-2019 at 08:22 AM.

  2. #17
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    https://m.mixcloud.com/hayfestivalpo...ames-naughtie/

    This is the reading and an interview with DeLillo after. Makes me want to read some of his stuff tbh

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  4. #19
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    Only just occurred to me that Cronenberg has adapted Ballard and DeLillo
    Did he do Cosmopolis? It seems to me that if you gonna adapt a book then you should understand it or at least think you understand it and so have an opinion on it. With Cosmopolis it felt as though that wasn't the case - so it was just a film with the guy from the vampire films driving around in a car. I dunno how good the book was to start with though to be fair. There was one line that stuck with me though (can't remember if it's in the film or not), something about buying a massive penthouse flat or whatever for 100 million dollars or whatever and making the point that the reason for paying that much was not cos of how good the flat was, it was simply to have paid that much money. You pay that much for the status of there being the fact that you have paid that much money - there is no other way to achieve that except by doing it. I think DeLillo put it better though. You'd hope so.
    My favourite of his books (that I've read) is White Noise - someone said it's too long which means they should never read Underworld which is five times as long with a fifth of the merit.

  5. #20
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    Don DeLillo: the Word, the Image and the Gun

    Revolutions, natural disasters, toxic fall-out, plane crashes - these are all part of the running picture of news against which America's leading novelist, Don DeLillo , sets his fiction. In this film, as in his novels, DeLillo pinpoints the deep unease beneath the surface of our lives. The film begins with the assassination of President Kennedy and the politics of violence it brought to television screens for the first time. It goes on to look at the way the media has continued to feed its audience images of disaster and terror: massacres in great public squares, disasters in football stadiums, and dramatic acts of terrorism. DeLillo explores the relationship between words and images, and between gunmen and the novelist.


  6. #21
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    Underworld is by far and away the worst novel I've ever read.

  7. #22
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    Did you actually read an 800 page novel you hated?

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  9. #23
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    I hated 'Disgrace' by JM Coetzee and forced myself through it, but it's only about 300 pages.

    Sometimes its actually fascinating reading a book you hate.

    I recently started reading a book about Shakespeare and the author quotes some of his rubbishy contemporaries, and it really brings how good Shakespeare was/is into focus.

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Underworld is by far and away the worst novel I've ever read.
    I'd go with either On the Road or Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Both unbelievably boring.

  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Did you actually read an 800 page novel you hated?
    I did. Mysterious. very uncharacteristic. See if you can find the opening page online. It's staggering. Nothing will ever be that bad again. It's a kind of degree zero.

  12. #26
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    He speaks in your voice, American, and thereís a shine in his eye thatís halfway hopeful. Itís a school day, sure, but heís nowhere near the classroom. He wants to be here instead, standing in the shadow of this old rust-hulk of a structure, and itís hard to blame himóthis metropolis of steel and concrete and flaky paint and cropped grass and enormous Chesterfield packs aslant on the scoreboards, a couple of cigarettes jutting from each. Longing on a large scale is what makes history. This is just a kid with a local yearning but he is part of an assembling crowd, anonymous thousands off the buses and trains, people in narrow columns tramping over the swing bridge above the river, and even if they are not a migration or a revolution, some vast shaking of the soul, they bring with them the body heat of a great city and their own small reveries and desperations, the unseen something that haunts the dayómen in fedoras and sailors on shore leave, the stray tumble of their thoughts,

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  14. #27
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    The opening's usually considered the best bit, it was published in Harper's as Pafko at the Wall then ended up being worked into the book.

  15. #28
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    That's even clumsier and dopier than I remembered it being. This was received rapturously by the critics . Astonishing

  16. #29
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    It came out the same year as the rings of Saturn, not a terrible book actually. Both got the most hyperbolic reviews I've ever seen so I read both of them. I was 18 or 19 probably, too old to be listening to critics but I was a late developer.

  17. #30
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    I don't think burning books is always wrong. I think it depends on the book.

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