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Thread: Don DeLillo

  1. #31
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    I like the incursion of

    longing on a large scale is what makes history

    The dopey tone I would expect to derive from the schoolskipping kid.

    I'm willing (I think) to read an 800 page Ulysses but not an 800 page underworld.

  2. #32
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    DeLillo’s Count Chocula

    We think Bram Stoker, Bela Legosi, Transylvania. Dark, foreboding castles. Coffins, fangs, mirrors without reflections. Bats flying in moonlight, creating archetypal shadows. Punctured necks and heaving bosoms. The townspeople assemble, demand vengeance.

    “To kill the vampire,” the mayor says. “To return to normal.”

    “Humans versus monsters,” agrees the blacksmith.

    A bar wench says, “The destruction the different. The restoration of the status quo.”


    The burlapped mob, moving as one body, winds up the mountain. A crowd, a mass, a flock. They arrive armed with pitchforks and burning torches; garlic and holy water; crosses and sharpened stakes. Talismans of a long dead science.

    The monster is defeated, as monsters are. Screams, curses, blood. The sad, victorious dawn.

    And now this chocolately cereal. Crunchy, with marshmallows.

  3. #33
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    I've read losds of books I hate. I always try and get to the end. Imagine if the last chapter, page or line redeems it somehow. In the case of Underworld imagine if it finished "Oh, by the way, ignore everything preceding this, in fact pretend I wrote the exact opposite of every line, then you will learn so much". Like that famous job interview test they used to give us at school which began "Read to the end before doing anything" and then asked you to do really stupid things. Imagine how radical that would be - has it ever been done? Then again if Underworld finished "and then I woke up and it was all a dream" would have been better.

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  5. #34
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    I group it with Terrence Malick. A specifically American stupidity. impotent dry humping. Bathetic.

  6. #35
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    I've read Mao II which was boring, but the ideas were fascinating, and I'm just finishing up Libra which is a lot better and a very sad book. It's got me rewatching the Zapruder film and Ruby shooting Oswald, also a "4K 360° VR" clip of the assassination.


  7. #36
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    James Ellroy is a writer. He writes long books about Anerica and they work. It can be done.

  8. #37
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    I thought The Black Dahlia was good, but went on a bit too long. The killer was also completely ridiculous.

  9. #38
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    He reminds me of Robert Downey jr. for some reason.


  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    I thought The Black Dahlia was good, but went on a bit too long. The killer was also completely ridiculous.
    All the early ones are ridiculous in one way or another. I remember one having a trained killer wolverine in it lol

  11. #40
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    I'm with you on Terrence Malick, did a couple of good films and fucked off for ages. When he came back he was a legend and everyone pretended they liked the comeback film which was just about ok I guess. After that every film got worse and worse - and when you consider that The New World was (at the time) one of the worst films I'd ever seen that means he really lowered the bar....
    James Ellroy I've barely read but the ones I have are great. Is it common knowledge that his style came out of the fact that he'd gone massively over the word count but really didn't want to change the plot so he just cut words out of every sentence with the result that they became terser, sharper, more urgent. A happy accident but he had the brains to capitalise.

  12. #41
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    I'd bet dollars Luka didn't like the good ones either.

  13. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    Is it common knowledge that his style came out of the fact that he'd gone massively over the word count but really didn't want to change the plot so he just cut words out of every sentence with the result that they became terser, sharper, more urgent. A happy accident but he had the brains to capitalise.
    That was LA Confidential apparently. He cut every "unnecessary" word from every sentence.

  14. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    I'd bet dollars Luka didn't like the good ones either.
    I liked Badlands and sort of liked, but dunno whether I really liked or disliked The Thin Red Line and The Tree of Life. They were both incredibly slow.

  15. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    I'd bet dollars Luka didn't like the good ones either.
    You're right.

  16. #45
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    Thin red lines got that goofy voiceover.

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