Page 168 of 178 FirstFirst ... 68118158166167168169170 ... LastLast
Results 2,506 to 2,520 of 2668

Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #2506
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    722

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CrowleyHead View Post
    Gaiman and Palmer makes sense, he used to be emotionally close to Tori Amos and they wrote each other's characters into their respective works; he's closer to that kind of geek than you might realize.

    Just read W.E.B Du Bois' "The Comet" and wished it was longer.
    i like Tori Amos up through The Choir Girl Hotel, if I'm being honest

    i am almost done J. Edgar Wideman's Writing to Save a Life. it is about Louis Till, father of Emmett Till, who was hanged by the US Army in Italy on rape and murder charges. Really good. J Edgar Wideman mixes non-fiction, memoir, and fiction. The story about the Emmett Till accuser coming out to say that Emmett Till never wolf-whistled at her came out while I was reading this book. Seems unfortunate that J. Edgar Wideman was not able to wrestle with that piece of information for this book.

    Emmett Till also came up in the March graphic novels by John Lewis (unsurprisingly) and I spent some time last year obsessing over the Emmett Till story while reading Miles Davis' autobiography - Miles spent a little time reflecting on it in the book.

    This child being murdered by white dudes who bragged about doing it after they were cleared by a jury of their white peers was the catalyst for the civil rights movement. Are we too desensitized now for a child murder to spur any kind of action? Sandy Hook did not spur anyone to do anything about gun laws. The Charleston Church shooting didn't even prompt people to change their facebook photos in sympathy. What will it take to inspire real action now?

  2. #2507
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Fear - Dublin
    Posts
    6,258

    Default

    Nice free little story from Matthew M Bartlett for fans of workplace terror.

    https://conquerorweird.wordpress.com...ew-m-bartlett/

  3. #2508
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Fear - Dublin
    Posts
    6,258

    Default

    Enjoying this:


  4. #2509
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    722

    Default

    i finished Don Quixote

    i just had to tell somebody

  5. #2510
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    11,179

    Default

    its quite long but its not nearly as boring as moby dick say. everyone should read it.

  6. #2511
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,590

    Default



    Except that mine's in a newer and less cool edition.

  7. #2512
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Fear - Dublin
    Posts
    6,258

    Default

    The cover blurb was right.

  8. #2513
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    722

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    its quite long but its not nearly as boring as moby dick say. everyone should read it.
    DQ never felt like a chore - i can see how parts of MD can feel like a slog. i love MD though.

  9. #2514
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I'm assuming someone here has read Rip It Up and Start Again? I've just started it and it's informative so far, so it's getting the job done. I really liked Energy Flash but got tired of his attempts at trying over and over again to describe how different tunes sounded (like a hurricane! a tsunami! A synth orgy on mars etc etc), so hopefully Rip It Up... doesn't go down that path

  10. #2515
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    14,999

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by empty mirror View Post
    DQ never felt like a chore - i can see how parts of MD can feel like a slog. i love MD though.
    empty mirror loves Dick - you heard it here first!
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Mr. Tea For This Useful Post:


  12. #2516
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    8,042

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deluxe.flex View Post
    I'm assuming someone here has read Rip It Up and Start Again? I've just started it and it's informative so far, so it's getting the job done. I really liked Energy Flash but got tired of his attempts at trying over and over again to describe how different tunes sounded (like a hurricane! a tsunami! A synth orgy on mars etc etc), so hopefully Rip It Up... doesn't go down that path
    I read it late last year, and absolutely loved it after not having read a Reynolds book for years. I know what you mean about Energy Flash, although I thought he was too good at the descriptions - certain tunes disappointed me when I actually got to hear them. Rip It Up is great story after great story; you won't get bored.

    Cue a complaint in a couple of weeks that you found it really boring.

  13. #2517
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    11,179

    Default

    How's your Shakespeare project coming along Corpsey? I done Anthony and Cleopatra this week. That was a good un

  14. #2518
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,878

    Default

    Urgh, don't remind me. Haven't read a SINGLE BLOODY PLAY.

    It might have been a mistake to try chronologically, cos The Taming of the Shrew isn't all that and following that it's some of the lesser history plays. Obviously what I WANT to be reading is Othello, Macbeth, Hamlet, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Henry IV... etc. (Side note: I've actually read most of these already.)

    Mostly though it's finding the time. The problem with Shakespeare AFAIC is that I have to constantly consult footnotes to decipher the bloody things. So even thought the plays are short, reading them represents a significant investment of time.

    Of course, by common consent his plays are the pinnacle of Western literature so perhaps I should stop bitching and get reading.

    I recently read 'Death in Venice' by Thomas Mann, twice, and now I'm reading 'Heart of Darkness', and hopefully will reread that too. It's struck me of late that I've been reading badly ever since university. Annotating everything, but not really meditating on what I've annotated. So now I aim to read without annotating the first time around, and then re read with the pencil handy.

  15. #2519
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,878

    Default

    Finished 'Heart of Darkness', finally, after many attempts had faltered around page 20 in the past. Hacking through the thick canopy of adjectives is initially challenging but there are rewards hidden in there for the intrepid - though not at the end of the river where, like 'Apocalypse Now', the novella nosedives in quality, roughly at the moment when Marlowe meets Kurtz.

    I wondered if Conrad had deliberately made Kurtz so underwhelming, if the idea is that the great figure we have been led to expect turns out to be not much more than a rather sordid opportunist, a man incapable of restraining his appetites for adoration and murder?

    Seemed to me that there were all sorts of similarities to 'Death in Venice', too. I'm not sure if that's a coincidence.

  16. #2520
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    11,179

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Urgh, don't remind me. Haven't read a SINGLE BLOODY PLAY.

    It might have been a mistake to try chronologically, cos The Taming of the Shrew isn't all that and following that it's some of the lesser history plays. Obviously what I WANT to be reading is Othello, Macbeth, Hamlet, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Henry IV... etc. (Side note: I've actually read most of these already.)

    Mostly though it's finding the time. The problem with Shakespeare AFAIC is that I have to constantly consult footnotes to decipher the bloody things. So even thought the plays are short, reading them represents a significant investment of time.

    Of course, by common consent his plays are the pinnacle of Western literature so perhaps I should stop bitching and get reading.

    I recently read 'Death in Venice' by Thomas Mann, twice, and now I'm reading 'Heart of Darkness', and hopefully will reread that too. It's struck me of late that I've been reading badly ever since university. Annotating everything, but not really meditating on what I've annotated. So now I aim to read without annotating the first time around, and then re read with the pencil handy.
    youre stressing out too much. if it feels like homework its a waste of time doing it. if youre consulting every footnote youre wasting youre time. the key to reading shakespeare is locating the rhythm. it often helps, i find it helps, to read aloud or subvocalise, using different voices, comedy ones are good, for each character. im not saying its always easy but it has musical qualities, and grasping that is the key to comprehension. 'locking in' to the rhythm to use a phrase used in the percussion thread. it clears up many more ambiguities than glossaries and footnotes.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •