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Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #2551
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    jim was having an interview to get onto his ma and they got to talking about ADTTMOT and the interviewer goes, well, its not proust is it, and jim goes, uh, guilelessly, ive never read proust, and the interviewer is thinking, yeah, nor have i mate its a figure of speech chill out mate

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  3. #2552
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I've embarked on against the day. I'm only 300 pages in but I'm enjoying it more than any other Pynchon I've read before.
    took a break from this and read high kenners book about english literature in england. he wrote it in the '80s its called a sinking island its brilliant i loved it.

  4. #2553

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    One of my pieces of advice to Jim was, whatever you do in the interview, do not pretend you have read something that you haven't. You might feel embarrassed about it, but at least it won't involve the terminal disaster of being caught bullshitting. Petty academics love nothing more than catching people out. It gives them an almost erotic thrill.

  5. #2554
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    took a break from this and read high kenners book about english literature in england. he wrote it in the '80s its called a sinking island its brilliant i loved it.
    My copy of Kenner arrived today - based on your recommendation, i'm looking forward to it.

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  7. #2555
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    Just finished Tzara's "Approximate Man & Other Writings" today. The poetry is good and sits with me well in a way I can't elocute but can still appreciate. The manifestos though are all *crumples in a ball and lobs out a window*

  8. #2556
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    Slaughterhouse Five. Not sure entirely what I think yet but I am enjoying it a lot. Somehow last night's events have made me more eager to finish it, though I am too hungover to today!

  9. #2557
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    Having a go with "This is Memorial Device" by David Keenan.
    Anyone else on it? Or been through it?

    It's OK... kinda interesting turns of phrase and a few good bits of conversation. Some funny bits, although a lot of feels completely unbelievable.

    And the whole thing feels a little bit too imagined rather than done, if you know what I mean. As in, you feel like too much is made up and there is a lot of rapturous / over the top language on every other page e.g. stuff like:

    "...and as I looked at the window and heard this long, sustained tone, this slow off-kilter drum beat, I thought to myself, when I die let me wake up here, let me reincarnate into this picture; let me live in this moment forever."

    Feels like he's massively nicked the structure from Bolano's Savage Detectives, in that it's recollections from lots of different people around a particular scene.

    Am about 80 pages through and will persevere cos it's very easy reading, just wondered if other people have read it, seen as it's a music book.

  10. #2558
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    I saw Keenan do a talk about the book and I've not started it yet myself, but a mate said it was better if you read it in his voice...

    He said that these sort of scenes could only be accurately captured in a novel (rather than something factual) because they were all about impossible people doing mad stuff.

    I am looking forward to getting into it after Volume 3 of Capital (820 pages in!)

  11. #2559
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    Probably the most compelling account of 1917 Ive read:



    https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...ian-revolution

  12. #2560
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    There's a good Novara FM show with him taking about the book.

    (They don't push him too hard etc etc)

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  14. #2561
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    Marion Milner - On Not Being Able to Paint

    Life changing ideas in here - she walks the line between eccentricity and brilliant insight extremely well. One of the best and most original writers I know.

  15. #2562
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    Quote Originally Posted by droid View Post
    Probably the most compelling account of 1917 Ive read:



    https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...ian-revolution
    I've just started it - my son is studying Russian history and I thought I'd be able to help him til I realised how much I had forgotten. I am enjoying it so far.

    Still reading the Kenner as recommended by Luka which is maybe one of the most entertaining litcrit books I've read in a long time.

    Just finished A Natural by Raisin and Edward Docx's latest about a son taking his father to Dignitas.

  16. #2563
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    He loves his anecdotes Kenner.

  17. #2564
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    i read the new jh pamphlet the other day. on. the. abyss. i think it was called.
    this is fun
    https://www.cai.cam.ac.uk/documents/jhp13

  18. #2565
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    "Focussing the mind on a task is call
    ed attention. It is a complex act,
    and in large measure it is a skill that can be practised and learned. Different
    kinds and powers of attention suit di
    fferent tasks; also, concurrent but
    separate continuities of attention will
    need to be kept running in separate
    channels, so that one train of reading and thought over a run of sessions will
    not blur across into another. With practice you will learn to adjust and keep
    control over attention, and maintain se
    veral distinct layers and channels at
    once. Here are a few initial suggestions. As you begin to read, size up the
    scale and genre of the work so that yo
    u are keyed into its tacit expectations,
    the kind of reader-involvement it looks for. You will often need to reconstruct
    this aspect historically, for a non-cont
    emporary work. Pay attention to the
    progressive disclosure of the work's structure and intentions. Observe the
    features of style that build up characteristic textures of language usage, idiom
    and figure and textual borrowing, an
    d observe the ways in which these
    features may also have their own internal development. Cultivate a close
    memory for specific turns of phrase, images, cadences and prosodic
    manoeuvres. But sometimes a prevailing idea may be implied only by
    multiple profiles and ambiguities, to the extent that no precisely clear view is
    ever offered; here we may have to hold on to shifting textures and nuance
    rather than simplifying reductively. "

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