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Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #2581
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    I wasn't rating them but I did choose my favourite 3

  2. #2582
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    Quote Originally Posted by craner View Post
    Good choices. Midsummer's tends to get a bad rep because of force-fed GCSE experiences, but when you read it as an adult, with some romance and life force under your belt, it is the most beautiful, gossamer-light weave of words ever spilt on the subjects of love and foolishness, etc. A splendid music box, a rich fantasy.

    Lear is just massive and monumental: so savage, yet so tender. And many other things too.

    I like your rating conceit. I might have a go at that tomorrow. I've read almost all of them.
    RATE THEM NOW NOW NOW!!

  3. #2583

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    TOMORROW TOMORROW I WILL I WILL!!!

  4. #2584
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    "34. Remember that reading intelligently also includes reading aloud,
    vocalising and performing a text as
    a spoken sequence of pitch and in-
    tonation, of modulated phrase contour and
    rhythm and tone or tones of voice.
    Different kinds and period-styles of composition aim at different modes of
    voicing, using sound and pace and emph
    asis for different kinds of effect.
    Metre and rhyme give shape to verse in ways best explored by reading aloud,
    just as wit and the nuances of comedy or
    satire come alive in skilled control of
    vocal inflection. Precise marking of irony or parody often depends on
    recognising the tones which signal these effects. Actors and singers are not
    the only ones who should practise to become versatile in these text-
    performance skills, because spoken utterance is an acutely testing aspect of
    formal interpretation, especially in re
    gard to the patterns of writing in its
    rhythms and cadences, and in its styles of social delivery. Experienced
    readers can also develop skills to hear the sound-aspects of a text silently in
    their own minds, just as musicians can read over a score and 'hear' its
    sonorities. Try to learn some poems or
    passages by heart; try out your powers
    of recognition and delivery by reading aloud to yourself or to each other, and
    then estimating how fully you have been able to catch the voice-qualities of
    the text. A person who can read aloud
    Venus and Adonis
    or
    The Rape of the
    Lock
    or
    Little Gidding
    , and can do so with apt verve and insight, is already well
    advanced in literary understanding. "

    https://www.cai.cam.ac.uk/sites/defa...es/reading.pdf

  5. #2585
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    Quote Originally Posted by craner View Post
    TOMORROW TOMORROW I WILL I WILL!!!
    you let us all down badly craner. Very, very badly.

  6. #2586

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    Craner’s Shakespeare Scorecard

    (Including plays written in collaboration but excluding those of seriously dubious authorship and the poems. Even though he had magnificent contemporaries, the collaborations are among those with the weakest marks.)

    Two Gentleman of Verona – Not read

    Taming of the Shrew – C

    Henry VI (3) – C

    Henry VI (1) – D

    Henry VI (2) – B

    Titus Andronicus - D

    Richard III – B

    Edward III – Not read

    Comedy of Errors – C

    Love’s Labour’s Lost – B (just missed out on an A)

    Richard II – A

    Romeo and Juliet – A

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream – A*

    King John – Not read

    Merchant of Venice – A

    Henry IV (1) – A*

    Merry Wives of Windsor – C (saved from being a D because I quite like the fact it was designed as a cynical vehicle for the popular Falstaff, and I enjoyed the silly
    bawdiness, like a crap 70s Italian sex comedy starring Edwige Fenech!)

    Henry IV (2) – A*

    Much Ado About Nothing – B

    Henry V – A

    Julius Caesar – A

    As You Like It – A

    Hamlet – A*

    Twelfth Night – A (this play used to irritate the crap out of me until I saw a stunning RSC production that lit up the text, not often you can really say that about
    contemporary theatrical performances.)

    Measure for Measure – A

    Othello – A

    All’s Well That End’s Well – C

    King Lear – A*

    Timon of Athens – C

    Macbeth – A*

    Antony and Cleopatra – A

    Pericles – D

    Coriolanus – A

    Winter’s Tale – A

    Cymbeline – Not read

    Tempest – A

    Henry VIII – Not read

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  8. #2587

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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    you let us all down badly craner. Very, very badly.
    Hey, I was just doing it now! I told and warned you I had a busy weekend. Give me a break!

  9. #2588

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    Roughly chronological list, btw.

  10. #2589
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    Why no A* for Othello, Craner? Not disagreeing just interested in your reasons.

    Currently reading "A High Wind in Jamaica". Also reading a book on prosody which is finally helping me to understand poetry. I think it will also help me understand why Shakespeare is the guvnor.

  11. #2590
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    Quote Originally Posted by craner View Post
    Craner’s Shakespeare Scorecard
    Winter’s Tale – A
    Really? I thought this play was a pile of arse. Full of daftness like characters easily disguising themselves so as to pass undetected by people they've known their whole lives. Yes I know you're meant to suspend disbelief, but come on.

    Having said that, it does have unarguably Shakespeare's greatest stage direction.

    Everything else of his I've seen or read has been pretty great.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  12. #2591

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Why no A* for Othello, Craner? Not disagreeing just interested in your reasons.

    Currently reading "A High Wind in Jamaica". Also reading a book on prosody which is finally helping me to understand poetry. I think it will also help me understand why Shakespeare is the guvnor.
    Sort of hard to say, it's like the difference between 'Axis: Bold as Love' (A) and 'Electric Ladyland' (A*), if you get what I mean.

  13. #2592

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Really? I thought this play was a pile of arse. Full of daftness like characters easily disguising themselves so as to pass undetected by people they've known their whole lives. Yes I know you're meant to suspend disbelief, but come on.

    Having said that, it does have unarguably Shakespeare's greatest stage direction.

    Everything else of his I've seen or read has been pretty great.
    Hmm, all about the intensity, extreme/opaque language, and general air of strangeness, airy complexity, savagery mixed with silliness. Saying it's daft seems a bit like watching 'The Exorcist' and saying, "well, that would never happen, would it? Rubbish."

  14. #2593
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Really? I thought this play was a pile of arse. Full of daftness like characters easily disguising themselves so as to pass undetected by people they've known their whole lives. Yes I know you're meant to suspend disbelief, but come on.

    Having said that, it does have unarguably Shakespeare's greatest stage direction.

    Everything else of his I've seen or read has been pretty great.
    Quintessential Tea criticism. Also highly wrong.

  15. #2594
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    As it happens it's the one I'm reading at the moment (on Craners recommendation) and it's got speeches as intense as nearly anything else in Shakespeare. The righteous Paulina laying into Leontes is v. Powerful.

    As you like it has disguises too. It's a standard dramatic device.

  16. #2595
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    Quote Originally Posted by craner View Post
    Hmm, all about the intensity, extreme/opaque language, and general air of strangeness, airy complexity, savagery mixed with silliness. Saying it's daft seems a bit like watching 'The Exorcist' and saying, "well, that would never happen, would it? Rubbish."
    Maybe I'm being harsh, I just remember not enjoying it as much as the other stuff I've studied/seen.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

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