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Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #2851

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    what do you think of patrick deneen, craner?

  2. #2852
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    Here in Czech Republic, two names keep coming up in conversation: @jordanbpeterson and @PatrickDeneen
    12:22 PM - 14 Mar 2018

  3. #2853

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    lol, similar writers so u can see why

  4. #2854
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    who is he? (craner wont have heard of him. )

  5. #2855

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    american catholic, teaches at notre dame. wrote a book recently that got a lot of reviews called why liberalism failed

  6. #2856

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    Can't remember half the stuff I read. But if I can't it isn't worth recommending, I suppose.

    This Is Memorial Device by David Keenan is excellent. Thoroughly enjoyable, and addictive. Just a delicious book I wanted to live in (I think Kim Gordon said that first) and wanted more of. It really brought back my younger years, driving around to practice studios and meeting mates of mates and swapping mini-discs and constantly fretting (geddit) about where my guitar was.

    The Cut by Anthony Cartwright is great. Nicely organised and humble-length. It focuses on character rather than come down on any side of the Brexit or North/South issues. It sparked a new avenue of thought for me.

    Tom Perrota. I've read a lot by this guy. He comes across as a white-male-writer-douche. Fellatio features far too much in his books. But they are great products. Close to airport-lit but they hit the spot. A guilty pleasure.

    Christopher Priest. Read a few of his recently, adore all of them. The Slip-Stream Anthology is worth a dip into too.

    The Shining by King. You've all seen the film. The book is still worth reading.

    Tony Tulathimutte's Private Citizens is really funny - a nice riff one the house of mirrors pessimism of identity politics and precariat ensnaring capitalism.

    That's all I can recall at the mo.

  7. #2857
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    Agree about Memorial Device. I think that and Viv Albertine's Clothes Music Boys have been the best music books I have read over the last few years.

    2018 so far for me:

    1. Fyodor Dostoyevsky - The Idiot
    2. Cyrus Bozorgmehr - Once Upon a Time in Shaolin: The Untold Story of Wu-Tang Clan's Million Dollar Secret Album, the Devaluation of Music, and America's New Public Enemy No. 1
    3. Gary Budden - Hollow Shores
    4. Chris Kraus - After Kathy Acker: A Biography
    5. Victor Pelevin - Omon Ra
    6. Stefan Szczelkun - Improvisation Rites: From John Cage's Songbooks to The Scratch Orchestra's Nature Study Notes - collective practises 2011-2017
    7. Sol Yurick - Metatron
    8. p.m. - bolo'bolo
    9. Elizabeth Carola - Hot and other stories
    10. Jean Richards - I Haven't Had So Much Fun Since My Leg Fell Off: The North London Civil Servants Strike 1987/88
    11. Emma Goldman - Living My Life
    12. Rhian E Jones and Eli Davies (eds) - Under My Thumb: Songs That Hate Women and the Women Who Love Them

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  9. #2858
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    the idiot is good. i really like it. the idiot and quixote are representatives of the vision out of step with history.
    unable to find any purchase on the world. jesus had he missed his cue. there's a kind of rudderless quality to them
    that's linked to the absence/successful sublimation of sexuality. i was always think of this picture.

    01c6328c4f8c9d94d5f26eac08717265.jpg
    'noli me tangere' almost flinching.

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  11. #2859
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    I still dream by James Smythe is a really wonderful, touching piece of sci-fi concerned with AI and memory. Not hugely dissimilar to Kim Stanley Robinson's Aurora except without all the spacey stuff.

  12. #2860
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    That is some impressive reading John. That looks like the list of a man with a commute. What do you make of Bolo Bolo at this remove from its writing? I read that in the 90s and I think recently got read of my copy, when I sadly realised they weren't going to come into existence very soon.

    2018 for me has been:

    Ghosts of the Tsunami - Richard Lloyd Parry. Excellent book about the disaster. The accounts of ghostly possession are terrifying.
    Psychodynamic Techniques - Karen Maroda. Deep like the mind of Farrakhan
    Most of an extremely dry book about counselling and the law
    A Burglars Guide to the City - Geoff Manaugh. Not as good as I was hoping.
    Into that Darkness - Gitta Sereny. Up there as one of the most harrowing things I've ever read yet compelling.
    Goodfellas - Nicholas Peleggi. What it says on the tin.
    Pursuit of the Millennium - Norman Cohn. A useful guide to what's going on in the Labour Party in 2018.
    Always Coming Home - Ursula K Le Guin. Amazing! A completely realised vision of a paradisal alternative society disguised as a collection of ethnographic texts.

    ... currently on the home straight of Black Swan - Nassim Taleb. It's good but he sounds quite punchable.
    Last edited by DannyL; 25-04-2018 at 07:27 PM.

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  14. #2861
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    That Sereny book is incredible.

  15. #2862
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    Isn't it? I decided to read after watching The Passenger by Andreej Munk, It really shook me and I wanted to deepen that rather than just forget about it. I didn't do anything else for the couple of days when I was reading it, it was as if I just had to just get the horror over with. I've got a big interest in body psychotherapies and I found her descriptions of how his physicality changed when she struck a nerve absolutely incredible. Reminds me of Syria on some level, of course.

  16. #2863
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    Her no-nonsense moral incisiveness is very illuminating, and also her emphasis on structural issues in the church.

    Its funny, when i first read about Stangl it was in a biography of Simon Wiesenthal where he was used as a cautionary tale of how anyone could be sucked inch by inch into the machinery of evil. Sereny casts serious doubt on his story, but I still couldnt help taking that lesson from her book.

    Also, Barry the St. Bernard.

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  18. #2864
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    You should have listened to the Kesh album whilst reading the Le Guin.

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  20. #2865
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    That is some impressive reading John. That looks like the list of a man with a commute. What do you make of Bolo Bolo at this remove from its writing? I read that in the 90s and I think recently got read of my copy, when I sadly realised they weren't going to come into existence very soon.
    Well it's 15 minutes on the train in the morning but I do also use books as a way of getting away from screens in the evenings/weekends...

    I really liked Bolo Bolo - it's kinda timeless in the way that utopian writing can be. The playfulness of it is very compelling and the lack of a rigid moralism is quite pragmatic.

    PM was a member of the autonomist marxist Midnight Notes collective and I have been reading a bunch of their stuff.

    He's implemented (some of) the ideas in Bolo Bolo in actual living spaces in Zurich with this: http://o500.org/ which I also like.

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