Page 198 of 210 FirstFirst ... 98148188196197198199200208 ... LastLast
Results 2,956 to 2,970 of 3136

Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #2956
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    404

    Default

    Thanks, Corpsey. I am not very fond of fantasy, but I'll give it a try. More recommendations?

  2. #2957
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    I'm currently reading Philip Pullman's 'His Dark Materials' trilogy, which is, I suppose, aimed at 'young adults' (teenagers). It's a very imaginative and gripping trilogy, not a chore to read by any means, and very well written, for the most part. It's easy to read but it employs a quite rich vocabulary that draws subtly on Blake and Milton.

    Read some of it here, perhaps you'll find yourself intrigued:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Northern-Li.../dp/1407130226
    Yeah, I read these an age ago and really enjoyed them. Don't tell craner though, he might explode, lol.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  3. #2958
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,607

    Default

    Yeah, I was wondering about that.

    My favourite ever fictions are Chekhov's short stories, but these are of course translated, so I'm not sure as to how enriching they will be for your vocabulary. Vocabulary-wise, there's Shakespeare, of course, but then there's also Nabokov. I suppose whether or not 'Lolita' is a chore depends upon your tastes (Luka hates him afaik), but I didn't find it to be one - and it's full of words that the most fluent English speaker will need to look up.

    Interesting to ponder whether a non-native English speaker would find lessons in Nabokov and Conrad, two non-native speakers who became master stylists in English.

  4. #2959
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,170

    Default

    Lolita includes the line "Let me be sentimental for the nonce...", which had me in fucking stitches, I can tell you.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  5. #2960
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,607

    Default

    Presumably that connotation wasn't alive to Nabokov...

    Urban dictionary informs me that the epithet comes from prison guards:

    'Not On Normal Communal Excercise'

    'Lolita' is one of the only Nabokov novels where he can be excused for being a haughty grandiloquent windbag of a writer, because Humbert Humbert is a haughty grandiloquent windbag of a narrator.

  6. #2961
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    404

    Default

    I have read Lolita already (in Dutch translation). Short stories seem perfect, even if translated, thanks for the great tip!

  7. #2962
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Presumably that connotation wasn't alive to Nabokov...

    Urban dictionary informs me that the epithet comes from prison guards:

    'Not On Normal Communal Excercise'
    Nah that's a backronym, like "Port Out, Starboard Home". It's just an ancient word for a nothing, a worthless person.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  8. #2963
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,607

    Default

    In that case, you could also try 'Dubliners' - Joyce's collection of short stories. In particular 'The Dead'.

  9. #2964
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    In that case, you could also try 'Dubliners' - Joyce's collection of short stories. In particular 'The Dead'.
    These can be had for (next to) nothing, fantastic. Thank you

  10. #2965
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,607

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Nah that's a backronym, like "Port Out, Starboard Home". It's just an ancient word for a nothing, a worthless person.
    The fact is I really sort of believed in the backronym

    My gullibility knows no bounds

  11. #2966
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Fear - Dublin
    Posts
    7,648

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by m99188868 View Post
    Could I appeal to Dissensus recommend me some fiction that is very engaging, while still having a rich vocabulary? I am looking for something to read in English just before bedtime. Something that will enrichen my vocabulary, but without being too burdening. It might be worn out classics, even the ones you read at school in the UK/US. Even fiction for children might do, if exceptionally well written. The goal is to improve my English writing skills by reading more native stuff untranslated, but it shouldn't feel like a chore. Any advice?
    I was going to recommend book one of the Earthsea trilogy. Beautifully written & poetic without being too verbose - but its fantasy as well.

    Have you considered some of the American classics? Hemmingway's 'Old man & the sea' and Steinbeck's 'The Pearl, short, aphoristic and plain in language, but engaging.

    My perennial recommendation is Peter Heller's 'the dog stars' which I think fits your bill as well. It's got some stylistically interesting sections which could help with your understanding of the colloquial.

  12. #2967
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    404

    Default

    Thank you, Droid. Great recommendations. My Amazon bill is gonna hurt.

  13. #2968
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    The fact is I really sort of believed in the backronym

    My gullibility knows no bounds
    Did you know the word 'gullible' isn't in the dictionary?
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Mr. Tea For This Useful Post:

    Leo

  15. #2969
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,607

    Default

    I've started reading 'The Beast in the Jungle' by Henry James. It's a 70 page novella, published in 1903, when James was 60. It's a 'meta' reading experience, the novella being about an extremely shy protagonist who can never directly reveal his secret fears, the style (presumably the 'standard' James style) being infinitely hesitant, nuanced, self-scrutinising, self-qualifying. In other words, it seems to be a story about James himself, and about why James writes as he writes.

    I recognise myself in this style. My own writing, especially on here, is full of these qualifications and evasions. And I'm a shy person, crippled by self-doubt, compelled to notice by the fear of some crouching beast. I'm no Henry James, but I can relate to him.

  16. #2970
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,607

    Default

    I should add that I find this style exasperating, as I would no doubt find my own 'style' on here to be exasperating, but that it certainly packs a high degree of nuance into a short space (paradoxically by greatly extending sentences).

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •