Page 203 of 211 FirstFirst ... 103153193201202203204205 ... LastLast
Results 3,031 to 3,045 of 3160

Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #3031
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    7,387

    Default

    And been reading various of Donne's Songs and Sonnets and been routinely dazzled - e.g. 'A Fever' and the sonnet which addresses the 'sunne'.

  2. #3032
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,700

    Default

    Collected short stories of both Grace Paley and Lucia Berlin - first class stuff from two writers i knew very little about before i started out on them.

    Just finished Alejandro Zambra's My Documents - Chilean writer who treads a fine line between autofiction, post modern self awareness and actually moving short stories.

    Charles Baxter's Burning Down The House - he writes really well about what he likes and dislikes about fiction - his pages on Joyce's The Dead are very good and i like someone who clearly states what he doesnt want writers to do - his chapter Against Epiphanies is funny and skewers those 'and suddenly i realised...' writers.

    and EEG by Daša Drndić the Croatian writer who died earlier this year - i have written about her before on here.

  3. #3033
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    175

    Default

    The Stack by Benjamin Bratton - it's mental.

  4. #3034
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    7,387

    Default

    I've been reading "The Fifth Elephant" by Terry Pratchett (a favourite of old) and enjoying every page, burning through it, divested of the need to analyse and process, a horrible/useful (I waver) habit I picked up in university, which probably ruinously confirmed that it is a "talent" of mine.

    Anyway, having that much fun reading made me wonder why I read other books that I read, often reluctantly. Sometimes the reluctance melts almost entirely - as when I read Paradise Lost. Which is, I think, more "important" than Wuthering Heights, say, even though I actually burned through the latter when I read it.

  5. #3035
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,295

    Default

    Paul Bowles - Let It Come Down is the latest one I've pulled out of one pile or off the top of another. I actually didn't know much about this book before starting it other than that it was set in Tangiers and I also had a vague belief that it contained some undefined seedy elements. I keep getting interrupted in my reading sadly - almost in a kinda of terrible sitcom manner - but so far I can absolutely confirm that my original thoughts were one hundred percent correct. It does indeed take place in Tangiers and there are some prostitutes, smugglers and guys trying to lead tourists to watch dirty movies in the first few pages. Actually there is one other thing I knew which is that a lot of people seem to really rate the book and I will say that I'm already intrigued. I don't have any idea at all of what is going to happen but I already have this sense that all will not go well. These first few pages have brought a foreshadowing of doom... although maybe I'm just imagining things and it will go in a direction totally different from that which I'm expecting. But I think I'm right, as well as the atmosphere I believe myself to have perceived, there is the fact that the nearest thing to a main protagonist is an American who has moved to Morocco on a whim to take up a position in the office of a company run by an old school friend. Almost immediately it becomes clear that this guy is hopelessly out of his depth and for good measure he's mentally unequipped to learn to swim.

  6. #3036
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,295

    Default

    Jenks - I just started reading Their Brilliant Careers as you made it sound interesting. The first chapter seems to be a pisstake of (the author of) those Gor books. I never read any of them but I remember often seeing shelves full of them in bookshops when I was little and thinking "What the fuck are they?" and "Why are they so many of them?". I'm actually kinda intrigued to read some of them now...

    Gor.jpg
    Last edited by IdleRich; 15-12-2018 at 08:14 PM.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to IdleRich For This Useful Post:


  8. #3037
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,295

    Default

    Someone here must have read those Muscle Mary of Gor books - are they as fucking mental as they look?

  9. #3038
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,700

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    Jenks - I just started reading Their Brilliant Careers as you made it sound interesting. The first chapter seems to be a pisstake of (the author of) those Gor books. I never read any of them but I remember often seeing shelves full of them in bookshops when I was little and thinking "What the fuck are they?" and "Why are they so many of them?". I'm actually kinda intrigued to read some of them now...

    Gor.jpg
    I think by the time you finish there wont be a literary genre he hasn't ripped the piss out of - it's very clever but not in a self regarding way. I really cannot understand why it hasn't been more widely praised. There is a very funny sting in its tail as well.

  10. #3039
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,700

    Default

    Wendy Erskine's Sweet Home - very impressive short story debut

    Anne Boyer - A Handbook of Disappointed Fate - great essays by author of Garments Against women - a kind of poetry/not poetry book from a couple of years ago

    and a new translation of Sir Gawain and The Green Knight - the perfect Christmas book for our times - head chopping, a quest, temptation and penance.

  11. #3040
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,295

    Default

    I think by the time you finish there wont be a literary genre he hasn't ripped the piss out of - it's very clever but not in a self regarding way. I really cannot understand why it hasn't been more widely praised. There is a very funny sting in its tail as well.
    But what about Gor? Have you read them? OK, not you maybe, but someone...

  12. #3041
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,700

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    But what about Gor? Have you read them? OK, not you maybe, but someone...
    No, not I.

  13. #3042
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,295

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jenks View Post
    No, not I.
    That's it... I'm going in.
    As for the careers book, I've hardly had a chance to read it but I really like it so far. Just starting the third chapter (once I get my order done and shut down Amazon) and the guy who formed ahem Kangeroulipo looks a lot like Richard Brautigan in the pic.

  14. #3043
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,295

    Default

    This book just got better and better. It's pretty rare for me to laugh out loud at a book but I did just that yesterday several times. In fact this book was pretty much the only thing keeping me sane as we spent hours and hours trying to get a non-existent flight into a drone ravaged Gatwick. Or... I've just had a terrible thought; perhaps I totally lost my sanity and I was giggling hysterically over nothing as the rest of the passengers stared at me aghast.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to IdleRich For This Useful Post:


  16. #3044
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,700

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    This book just got better and better. It's pretty rare for me to laugh out loud at a book but I did just that yesterday several times. In fact this book was pretty much the only thing keeping me sane as we spent hours and hours trying to get a non-existent flight into a drone ravaged Gatwick. Or... I've just had a terrible thought; perhaps I totally lost my sanity and I was giggling hysterically over nothing as the rest of the passengers stared at me aghast.
    So glad you like it - make sure to read the index.

  17. #3045
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    473

    Default

    Having a good smeck at two pop intellectual bestsellers from the oughts: Smart Mobs by Howard Rheingold and Everything Bad is Good for Youby Steven Johnson. The naive faith in collective intelligence as a solution to political issues, or as a driver of cultural evolution, is just laughable in hindsight. And there were so many books and articles in this vein: more connections and communication means more intelligence, faster thinking is smarter and better (I'm thinking of Malcolm Gladwell's Blink). What they failed to take into account was the fundamental nastiness of human nature, that excess communication leads to hyper-polarization and group serving bias, and that the corporate approach to problem solving and creative solutions - ie by committee - weeds out imagination and originality in favor of the ideal average, pure neutrality. Real insight, originality and intelligence has always come from the margins, which worries me because I don't think a marginal or critical perspective is possible anymore unless you are, I don't know, somehow immune to the etiologies of mental illness.

    So now we're stuck with popism, Trumpism, and outrage cycles.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •