Page 214 of 216 FirstFirst ... 114164204212213214215216 LastLast
Results 3,196 to 3,210 of 3240

Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #3196

    Default

    I wasn't using the term conservative as a pejorative or as a synonym for a flatly reactionary social agenda.

  2. #3197
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    On the bus
    Posts
    665

    Default

    Back on the audiobook of The Underground History of American Education. I think it's turning into my manual for the world and how we got to where we are. It's the one book I wish everyone would read. A relentless onslaught detailing just how planned every aspect of society is to keep the things and especially us working in the favour of 'them.'
    Took a rest stop that wasn't on the schedule

  3. #3198
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,678

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by craner View Post
    I wasn't using the term conservative as a pejorative or as a synonym for a flatly reactionary social agenda.
    Well in that case you may be at least partly correct.

    I suppose I'm talking about a change in worldview rather than a position that can be categorised as 'conservative' or 'progressive' per se.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  4. #3199
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,369

    Default

    Got three books on my bedside table lined up to read next. Had to pick out of

    Pfitz by Andrew Crumey
    "Pfitz manifests the same healthy disdain for realism that made his first novel, Music in a Foreign Language, such a pleasant surprise. His borrowings from Borges, Calvino and Pavic are here just as shameless. But at this rate Crumey may yet become a hero to fans of the postmodern Euro-novel who wonder why we Brits seldom produce a homegrown variety." Jonathan Coe in The Guardian " "In the manner of Flann O'Brien's classic At-Swim-Two Birds, Pfitz is a hilariously mind-boggling story within a story within a story, all of whose characters eventually intrude on one another as plot lines converge. Sf fans will want to join the literati in laughing over former theoretical physicists Crumey's brainy romp." Ray Olson in Booklist "Andrew Crumey's novel is a clever, dazzling puzzle, intricately crafted..."
    Cows by Matthew Stokoe (which for some reason I have been putting off for a while)
    "I challenge thee to find a bloodier, greasier, shittier (absolute literal meaning intended) book than Cows. Peppered with gratuitous uses of the word “c-nt”, obscene amounts of violence, and unbearable nihilism, Cows is the most vile novel I have ever read. I regret being so curious as to make it through the entirety of this book (I stopped about 25% of the way through because I almost puked, but picked it back up again a few days later because I thought I needed to know how it ended). I wouldn’t trust the moral compass of whomever has finished book - yes, myself included - and would run far, far away from those who say they enjoyed it. Cows is a hedonistic vomitorium that takes bestiality, voyeurism, gore, and depravity to a whole new fucking level."
    An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears
    "We are in England in the 1660s. Charles II has been restored to the throne following years of civil war and Cromwell's short-lived republic. Oxford is the intellectual seat of the country, a place of great scientific, religious, and political ferment. A fellow of New College is found dead in suspicious circumstances. A young woman is accused of his murder. We hear the story of the death from four witnesses: an Italian physician intent on claiming credit for the invention of blood transfusion; the son of an alleged Royalist traitor; a master cryptographer who has worked for both Cromwell and the king; and a renowned Oxford antiquarian. Each tells his own version of what happened. Only one reveals the extraordinary truth.
    With rights sold for record-breaking sums around the world, An Instance of the Fingerpost is destined to become a major international publishing event. Deserving of comparison to the works of John Fowles and Umberto Eco, Iain Pears's novel is an ingenious tour de force: an utterly compelling historical mystery with a plot that twists and turns and keeps the reader guessing until the very last page."
    Opted for the last one cos I've meant to get round to it since it was first recommended to me some ten or fifteen years ago. I ordered it off Amazon once only to have the order cancelled for some reason. I was quite pleased to find it a month or so back in the second hand English bookstore in Lisbon. In fact, I got it for free (effectively) cos I off-loaded a pile of books I'd read and they gave us credit for them.

  5. #3200
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Just finished rings of Saturn, wg sebald. Pretty good. Some bits very good, like the Joseph Conrad section, weird how that one just broke off far earlier than I thought it should have done, but I suppose that's his thing.

    Also read 'do everything wrong' by jarett kobek, about xxxtentacion. Very good, more a long article than a book tho. I listened to '17', it's ok.

  6. #3201
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,369

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by catalog View Post
    Just finished rings of Saturn, wg sebald. Pretty good. Some bits very good, like the Joseph Conrad section, weird how that one just broke off far earlier than I thought it should have done, but I suppose that's his thing.
    Didn't we do that as the inaugural "dissensus book club" read many years ago? Or maybe it was Austerlitz. Either way I much preferred Rings of Saturn out of those two books... it's a distant memory but I remember bits of it really kinda touching me. How does it end? I seem to recall the last passage being very stark and powerful but I could be thinking of something else.

  7. #3202
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,678

    Default

    The first was Austerlitz. I enjoyed both very much. I think TRoS just ends with him in some faded Victorian hotel in a bleak Suffolk coastal town on the off season, feeling a bit miserable (for a change). At least that's how I remember it. I don't think anything 'happens' as such.

    Anyone got any idea why it's titled the way it is?
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  8. #3203
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Yeah there's this whole strain of black-supremacist fringe thought that's adopted wholesale the 'race realist' position from white supremacists and just reversed the value judgement.
    There's also a fringe theory that us aspies are all part-Neanderthal (neurotypical prosocial traits enabled hom sap to band together and basically locker-slam our primate nerd forebears into extinction), which overlaps somewhat with the theory that "white devils" are para-human, lacking in empathy, etc.

  9. #3204
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Re TRoS - it ends with this long tale about silkworm farming and how it evolved, coming over to Europe from china, having been kept secret, and the Germans think about how it can be made into an industry, but it doesn't work, cos it's harder than people think. after he's talked about that for a while, i tihkn he just gets picked up by his wife or something. it's not a great ending tbh.
    i don't recall an explicit explanation of why it's called what it's called, but there's a general feel of reflection about it all and he's obviously an old man so maybe he's in his 2nd saturn's return or something, although i think he actually died before he was 60 so that might not be quite right. yeah, odd. i'm sure some wag online has worked it out...

    oh yeah wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rings_of_Saturn#Title

  10. #3205
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,678

    Default

    I'd thought Sebald killed himself but Wikipedia tells me died in a car crash.

    Regarding the title, I guess Saturn/Kronos is also the prototypical Old Father Time.

    Quote Originally Posted by poetix View Post
    There's also a fringe theory that us aspies are all part-Neanderthal (neurotypical prosocial traits enabled hom sap to band together and basically locker-slam our primate nerd forebears into extinction), which overlaps somewhat with the theory that "white devils" are para-human, lacking in empathy, etc.
    Evolved, or were genetically engineered by Yakub?
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  11. #3206
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Evolved, or were genetically engineered by Yakub?
    Personally I would totally rep a theory in which me and my kind were the product of demonic experimentation by a mad scientist.

  12. #3207
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    16,678

    Default

    Yeah it makes us sound pretty badass tbh.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  13. #3208
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,369

    Default

    Sebald died in a car crash yeah. Apparently it scuppered his chances of a Nobel Prize for Literature cos you have to be alive to get that. Least of his worries though I suppose (or maybe best say he has none at all).
    I took Rings of Saturn to mean something similar to the title Robinson in Space - which I understand to mean something about travelling round outside of one's familiar locale. Maybe. I dunno. It just sort of felt that way to me on some level but I could be totally wrong about both titles. And the notion that they are similar.

  14. #3209
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,369

    Default

    I must be thinking of something else with respect to the ending then. I often read several things at the same time and thus I can associate and mix them in my head even though really they have nothing more in common than that I happened to pick them off the shelf in the same week.

  15. #3210
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    207

    Default

    I think it would have been better if he got into a few more scrapes, met some people, did some blow, went to a rave etc. The bit near the beginning where he's in Lowestoft is really good, cos he's so dismissive of it and caustic, so its very amusing. He spends ages talking about all these old halls that he visits, which is also quite interesting, but maybe gets a bit much. I think his style of writing is excellent, very meandering and different voices in the same sentence, so it's like someone sat in front of you telling a story. It's just some of the subject matter is a bit boring for me. The air of melancholy is pretty palpable, I've just been to a Ruskin exhibition and he strikes me as a similar outlook type person, just a depressive perspective on things cos of his early life experiences.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •