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Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #3271
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    Yes that is what Pynchon makes quite a big thing of, how it just pre-dated the internet when it was just about sort of possible to go off grid. Looking forward to getting stuck into it in fact but got delayed in taking the plunge by events and stuff.

  2. #3272
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Finished Iliad about a week ago... something that really jars is that very often a character will say several sentences to another, and then almost immediately the second character will repeat the entire speech - a whole paragraph! - to a third. Just not something you'd ever see in a novel, unless the author were aiming for a very specific effect.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Now reading Catch-22 again before watching the series on Channel 4.
    Haha!

    catch22.jpg
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  3. #3273
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    Reading A Streetcar Named Desire.

    Some of the best stuff is in the stage directions.

    [More laughter and shouts of parting come from the men. Stanley throws the screen door of the kitchen open and comes in. He is of medium height, about five feet eight or nine, and strongly, compactly built. Animal joy in his being is implicit in all his movements and attitudes. Since earliest manhood the center of his life has been pleasure with women, the giving and taking of it, not with weak indulgence, dependency, but with the power and pride of a richly feathered male bird among hens. Branching out from this complete and satisfying center are all the auxiliary channels of his life, such as his heartiness with men, his appreciation of rough humor, his love of good drink and food and games, his car, his radio, everything that is his, that bears his emblem of the gaudy seed-bearer. He sizes women up at a glance, with sexual classifications, crude imagesflashing into his mind and determining the way he smiles at them.]
    BLANCHE [drawing involuntarily back from his stare]:
    You must be Stanley. I'm Blanche.
    Last edited by Corpsey; 09-07-2019 at 02:36 PM.

  4. #3274
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    Finished Streetcar, read a Flannery O'Brien story today - "The Life You Save May Be Your Own".

    From Cliffnotes.com

    Drawing on the definitions laid down by the medieval interpreters of the scriptures, O'Connor noted, "The kind of vision the fiction writer needs to have, or develop, in order to increase the meaning of his story is called anagogical vision, and that is the kind of vision that is able to see different levels of reality in one image or situation." After continuing her discussion, in which she considers two other kinds of interpretation used by the medieval commentators — the allegorical and the topological, she continues, "one they called anagogical, which had to do with the Divine life and our participation in it . . . was also an attitude toward all creation, and a way of reading nature which included most possibilities, and I think it is this enlarged view of the human scene that the fiction writer has to cultivate if he is ever going to write stories that have any chance of becoming a permanent part of our literatures."
    There follows a detailed symbolic/religious interpretation, I must admit none of it ever occurred to me when reading it but I really enjoyed reading it anyway.

  5. #3275
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Flannery O'Brien
    You've combined two different writers there.

  6. #3276
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    You've combined two different writers there.
    Flan O'Brien and... Flannery O'Connor is it?

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  8. #3278
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    Ha, I'm doing it now... Wise Blood.

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  10. #3279
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    The one who wrote True Blood?
    Nah, Third Policeman, At Swim Two Birds, that lot.
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  11. #3280
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    It is indeed getting more and more difficult, even pointless, for me to write in formal English. And more and more my language appears to me like a veil which one has to tear apart in order to get to those things (or the nothingness) lying behind it. Grammar and style! To me they seem to have become as irrelevant as a Biedermeier bathing suit or the imperturbability of a gentleman. A mask … Of course, for the time being, one makes do with little. At first, it can only be a matter of somehow inventing a method of verbally demonstrating this scornful attitude vis-à-vis the word. In this dissonance of instrument and usage perhaps one will already be able to sense a whispering of the end-music or of the silence underlying all.

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  13. #3281
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    Nah, Third Policeman, At Swim Two Birds, that lot.
    Yeah, but the quote says "her" - that's not him is it? So it must be the one who wrote Wise Blood.

  14. #3282
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    I need to read more Flann O'Brien; I've only read The Third Policeman.

  15. #3283
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    In other news

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Finished Streetcar, read a Flannery O'Brien story today - "The Life You Save May Be Your Own".

    There follows a detailed symbolic/religious interpretation, I must admit none of it ever occurred to me when reading it but I really enjoyed reading it anyway.
    Quote Originally Posted by New York Review of Books
    But let foolish readers beware—especially when they indulged in the kind of symbol-hunting forays that were so often encouraged by classroom misapplications of the New Criticism plus Freud. What is probably her most widely read story—“A Good Man Is Hard to Find”—was particularly subject to such treatment.
    …There were a couple of young teachers there and one of them, an earnest type, started asking the questions. “Miss O’Connor,” he said, “why was the Misfit’s hat black?” I said most countrymen in Georgia wore black hats. He looked pretty disappointed. Then he said, “Miss O’Connor, the Misfit represents Christ, does he not?” “He does not,” I said. He looked crushed. “Well, Miss O’Connor,” he said, “what is the significance of the Misfit’s hat?” I said it was to cover his head; and after that he left me alone. Anyway, that’s what’s happening to the teaching of literature.
    (May 25, 1959)

  16. #3284
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    I need to read more Flann O'Brien; I've only read The Third Policeman.
    The Poor Mouth was the first of his I read, it's gently amusing (like his Catechism of Cliché), but The Third Policeman is his best

  17. #3285
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    Quote Originally Posted by HMGovt View Post
    The Poor Mouth was the first of his I read, it's gently amusing (like his Catechism of Cliché), but The Third Policeman is his best
    I really liked At Swim Two Birds - I didn't know that he wrote many novels, I had it in my head that most of his writing was columns and essays and the like for some reason.

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