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Thread: what are you reading now?

  1. #3331
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    I'm reading minima moralia by Adorno. It's the easy one. All the other stuff is Too hard but this is great.

  2. #3332
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    Yesterday I read "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" by Flannery O'Connor.

    I've now read three stories by her and she's already joined my pantheon of favourite writers.

    A true blue genius.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  3. #3333
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    “She would have been a good woman,” the Misfit said, “if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life”
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  4. #3334
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    I read The Hare With Amber Eyes the other day. Was a present from my mum. Apparently winner of the Costa award or something but don't let that put you off... if you don't know it's this guy who inherits this collection of Japanese figurines from his great uncle and traces their journey through the family down to him - basically a device to tell the story of his recent ancestors, the fabulously wealthy Jewish banking family Ephrussi. Now, I've never heard of these guys, which, seeing as they were apparently on the same level of the Rothschilds up to the first world war, that one of them was a massive sponsor of Degas, Renoir and other impressionists and is partly who Proust based Swann on, plus they are mentioned as tight bastards in Sholem Alaichem, is no doubt horrendous ignorance on my part. Anyway, the book is about the Paris and Vienna based branches of the family and then spreads further afield to Japan but ultimately cannot help but be about the huge event in the middle of the century which wiped out their wealth and almost them as well. An interesting book that conjures up these places and the art they loved and collected and how it was ripped apart and it does it all with a lack of sentimentality plus huge amounts of learning. I guess it might mean even more if you've read the whole of Proust (I've only read the first book I confess) but even so it's fascinating.

  5. #3335
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    I liked the Hare book very much - the way the objects are a vehicle for the story of the twentieth century. It’s the kind of precious writing that Lula would hate.

  6. #3336
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenks View Post
    I liked the Hare book very much - the way the objects are a vehicle for the story of the twentieth century. It’s the kind of precious writing that Lula would hate.
    Precious? I guess it is kinda finicky at times although I wouldn't have said it was a problem cos it all fits together so well - feels like it was the right way to write it.

    Anyway, I picked upa load of charity shop books in the UK, started The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell on the flight back today and it seems promising so far... I like his other ones anyhow.

  7. #3337
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenks View Post
    I liked the Hare book very much - the way the objects are a vehicle for the story of the twentieth century. It’s the kind of precious writing that Lula would hate.
    Definitely gonna call him Lula from now on, nice one Jenks!
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  8. #3338
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    Quote Originally Posted by yyaldrin View Post
    i'm reading crime and punishment, hadn't read anything by dostoevsky before because somehow i always thought it was very highbrow and complicated. it's kind of the opposite tho, very addictive. story so far like a television soap. fit's in nicely with the incel discussion too cos there's so many losers in the story.
    just read this bit and i like the idea of "unreal fantasy":

    "What do people generally say?" muttered Svidrigaïlov, as though speaking to himself, looking aside and bowing his head. "They say, 'You are ill, so what appears to you is only unreal fantasy.' But that's not strictly logical. I agree that ghosts only appear to the sick, but that only proves that they are unable to appear except to the sick, not that they don't exist."
    "Nothing of the sort," Raskolnikov insisted irritably.
    "No? You don't think so?" Svidrigaïlov went on, looking at him deliberately. "But what do you say to this argument (help me with it): ghosts are, as it were, shreds and fragments of other worlds, the beginning of them. A man in health has, of course, no reason to see them, because he is above all a man of this earth and is bound for the sake of completeness and order to live only in this life. But as soon as one is ill, as soon as the normal earthly order of the organism is broken, one begins to realise the possibility of another world; and the more seriously ill one is, the closer becomes one's contact with that other world, so that as soon as the man dies he's tips straight into that world. I thought of that long ago. If you believe in a future life, you could believe in that, too."

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  10. #3339
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    Which translation are you reading?

  11. #3340
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    translated by constance garnett, does it sound different than the one you read?

  12. #3341
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    I haven't read Crime & Punishment yet but I have a bunch of different translations of some of his other stuff (The Idiot, Notes from Underground, The Brothers Karamazov) and there's some dispute over which is the best. Apparently the Pevear & Volokhonsky stuff is really good but a bunch of people have criticised it too, saying it's translated very literally so it's more accurate but reads awkwardly.

  13. #3342

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    BEE SEASON, baby
    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    It says bless the lads and it means bless the lads.
    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    i don't know, probably some marxist cultural theory or something
    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    gabber terrorism is fun but not all the time, sometimes you gotta be sophisticated or sulky for the ladies.
    https://manifestacionesoterica.bandcamp.com/

  14. #3343
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    Steve Hanley's "The Big Midweek" – which has the best passage I've ever read about the Pistols gig at the Lesser Free Trade Hall:

    Marc and I only stay for the first couple of songs by the headlining act. The lead singer's enigmatic, I'll give him that. But the band as a whole are making a pub-band racket, so we head off for a bag of chips
    Brilliant

  15. #3344
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  16. #3345
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    Got my Flann O'Brien anthology back from a mate the other day, after a long absence, so I've really had no choice but to read The Third Policeman again. Every bit as batshit and beautifully written as I remember it from years ago.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

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