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Thread: Films you've seen recently and would unreservedly recommend:

  1. #2776
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    Quote Originally Posted by klks2000 View Post
    Curious if anyone has anything to say about it.....
    Hi there! Some Arrival chat on p180-181 of this thread. Welcome aboard.
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  2. #2777

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    Quote Originally Posted by klks2000 View Post
    Curious if anyone has anything to say about it.....
    Great movie. It gives constructivist view of the linearity of time and how our epistemology is inescapably controlled by the nature of our language. Interesting stuff. It's got a really exciting plotline, too, and it's definitely a pretty film. I could do without the politically loaded sequences or analogies, though. They kinda interfere with the philosophical aspect to it, which seems to be the core.

  3. #2778
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    Quote Originally Posted by entertainment View Post
    I could do without the politically loaded sequences or analogies, though.
    I thought this at the time - well, more specifically, "did they have to make the Chinese nuke-happy dickheads?" - but interestingly it's based on a story by a guy who is himself ethnic Chinese.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    I thought this at the time - well, more specifically, "did they have to make the Chinese nuke-happy dickheads?" - but interestingly it's based on a story by a guy who is himself ethnic Chinese.
    well, chinese-american.

    though as milio yiannopolis should have taught everyone by this point, being part of a particular group does not mean you speak for that minority.

    i dont know how faithful the film was to the book...

  5. #2780
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    I watched Seven Samurai over the weekend (in two installments, as it's so bloody long). Great stuff, absolutely epic and beautifully shot. I don't know whether it's the film's age, its being a product of a culture I'm not too familiar with or both, but I found some of the acting oddly stilted, but not to the extent that it detracted too much from the film as a whole. The fight scenes looked very amateurish compared to a modern production but gave an excellent idea of how frantic and terrifying hand-to-hand combat really is. I can really see why people call Kurosawa's oeuvre the 'Eastern Western' - the influence is obvious right from the start.

    I don't quite understand why the bandits insist on attacking the village over and over again when they're being repulsed and having several of their number killed each time - wouldn't it just be easier to go and raid another, less hard, village? Or perhaps, in Japanese society of the time, even the bandits have a code of honour, of a sort, that can't be satisfied until they've achieved what they set out to do.

    Also the soundtrack is about 80% yelling, screaming and maniacal laughter.
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  6. #2781
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubberdingyrapids View Post
    well, chinese-american.

    though as milio yiannopolis should have taught everyone by this point, being part of a particular group does not mean you speak for that minority.
    Lol, meaning that if he were Chinese-Chinese, he would of course have total loyalty to his country's government? (I know you don't mean that exactly, but...)

    I think we can give him the benefit of the doubt and assume that criticism of the Chinese Communist Party and the country's military doesn't necessarily make him a self-loathing race-traitor.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 20-03-2017 at 12:56 PM.
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  7. #2782
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Lol, meaning that if he were Chinese-Chinese, he would of course have total loyalty to his country's government? (I know you don't mean that exactly, but...)

    I think we can give him the benefit of the doubt and assume that criticism of the Chinese Communist Party and the country's military doesn't necessarily make him a self-loathing race-traitor.
    im saying that american international relations/biases can be absorbed quite easily, even if he is 'ethnically chinese'.

    as far as the film, id say chinese military/govt people actually came out of it sympathetically in the end, or at least at the very end.

    on a very similar note (because it saves its big reveal until the final hand, except here the british govt come off worse, after being depicted with much stilted even handedness, while in arrival, the chinese govt come off sympathetically, after many displays of kneejerk irrationality), i saw viceroys house. id say the british come out of it pretty well. theyre not implicated as much as you might imagine, nor are they let off the hook entirely. the film walks this balancing act almost to a fault really, so fairly it ties itself into a bit of a dull knot. but emotionally, its pretty powerful. as good a film as the modern british film industry is prob going to allow anyone to make about british rule in india. though i dont know if i know many other films about the british empire. i might need to go back and rewatch jewel in the crown and some of those merchant ivory films.

  8. #2783
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubberdingyrapids View Post
    im saying that american international relations/biases can be absorbed quite easily, even if he is 'ethnically chinese'.

    as far as the film, id say chinese military/govt people actually came out of it sympathetically in the end, or at least at the very end.
    And my point was that I don't think you need to've been brainwashed by Uncle Sam to have not entirely warm feelings towards the Chinese government, especially if your own parents are Chinese.

    But yeah, the Chinese general was portrayed pretty sympathetically. And let's not forget that some American jarheads nearly wreck the whole thing with that bomb.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    And my point was that I don't think you need to've been brainwashed by Uncle Sam to have not entirely warm feelings towards the Chinese government, especially if your own parents are Chinese.

    But yeah, the Chinese general was portrayed pretty sympathetically. And let's not forget that some American jarheads nearly wreck the whole thing with that bomb.
    It's a very good film, it's hit me hard both times I've watched it. Conceptually subtle too - strong whorfian hypothesis, reverse causality, ET noblesse oblige and a potent emotional punch, for me anyway. What I'm saying is I blubbed, copiously and at length.
    Last edited by HMGovt; 20-03-2017 at 05:09 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rubberdingyrapids View Post
    well, chinese-american.

    though as milio yiannopolis should have taught everyone by this point, being part of a particular group does not mean you speak for that minority.

    i dont know how faithful the film was to the book...
    One thing which was a huge improvement was the daughters death. A freak congenital disease is inevitable and unalterable as compared to a rock climbing accident.

    That said, the short story is immense.

  11. #2786
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    Quote Originally Posted by HMGovt View Post
    strong whorfian hypothesis
    "Today is a good day to die"? Nah I didn't really get that at all.
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  12. #2787

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    I watched Stalker by Tarkovsky which was a strange ride. Despite the tempo being very slow, I was constantly faced with the unease of not being able to digest it all in time. Right from the opening scene, you know you're being told a story by someone in supreme capability. Every nuance matters and nothing is present by default. Maybe I was too engaged in the ongoing cerebral analysis that I didn't let my instincts lead me onto what this movie is about, but I'm still not quite sure what to make of it.

    For those who are unfamiliar with the film, it's a 1979 sovjet science fiction. The main character, the Stalker, is one of few around capable of and desirous for entering and roaming "the zone". We're not introduced to the concept of the zone in any univocal way. It's sealed of to the public by the military but it's unclear exactly why, except for the prospective presence of some kind of metaphysical force. Anyways, the Stalker is in the business of taking tourists to the zone and the plot tells the story of him shepherding two peculiar guys around in search of 'the room' at the center of the zone. This room is said to provide its visitors with the fulfilment of their deepest desires.

    My thoughts on interpretation really doesn't make sense unless anyone else has seen it. I can't really get it out of my head, and that must be a good sign at any rate, so I do recommend it strongly to anyone who hasn't seen it. I seem to recall K-punk mentioning it in some blog post, too, but I have forgotten what post or in which relation it was brought up.

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    ^ a stone cold classic

    speaking of classics, i lent bladerunner to a friend who had never seen it. his roommate, who had seen it once before, had this to say:

    So I watched blade runner for the second time, and I have to say I just don't dig it. I know it's supposed to be this great pivotal sci-fi movie, but there's hardly any plot, less dialogue, and the scenes drag on. Also there are flying cars but the TV's all have static. I don't know maybe I don't fully appreciate it. I'll put Chinatown and citizen cane in the same category of "great films" I didn't like.


    at first i was shocked but all his points are correct*. i am just not put off by those things.



    * actually the thing about TV static is kinda off. here in the future, who would have thought we'd be watching shitty-resolution videos of old shows on youtube, that we'd be listening to lower quality reproductions of music (streaming, digital formats) or that the sound quality of phone calls would degenerate. who ever had a dropped call on a landline?
    Last edited by empty mirror; 22-03-2017 at 09:51 AM.

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    I don't rate Blade Runner as highly as others do, and feel somehow guilty or shortchanged as a consequence.

    I think Blade Runner might mean more to people who saw it at the time, and are therefore more able to see how it created a whole look, sound and feel for sci-fi that didn't exist before. (That is, at least, I don't think it existed before.)

    The look and sound of it remain stunning. The opening shot, flying over the cityscape with that Vangelis music, is absolutely brilliant, and the effects haven't dated.



    I miss that gritty look sci-fi had back in the 70s/80s. I think I first became acquainted with it through Red Dwarf, actually. Then later on 2000AD. All exposed piping, steam, spaceships that look like they're about to fall apart, etc. Nowadays I think it's fair to say that even sci-fi dystopias will tend to look like they were designed by Apple.

  15. #2790
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    Quote Originally Posted by empty mirror View Post
    ^ a stone cold classic

    speaking of classics, i lent bladerunner to a friend who had never seen it. his roommate, who had seen it once before, had this to say:

    So I watched blade runner for the second time, and I have to say I just don't dig it. I know it's supposed to be this great pivotal sci-fi movie, but there's hardly any plot, less dialogue, and the scenes drag on. Also there are flying cars but the TV's all have static. I don't know maybe I don't fully appreciate it. I'll put Chinatown and citizen cane in the same category of "great films" I didn't like.


    at first i was shocked but all his points are correct*. i am just not put off by those things.



    * actually the thing about TV static is kinda off. here in the future, who would have thought we'd be watching shitty-resolution videos of old shows on youtube, that we'd be listening to lower quality reproductions of music (streaming, digital formats) or that the sound quality of phone calls would degenerate. who ever had a dropped call on a landline?
    I relate.
    I was but a wee bairn when blade runner came out - too young to see it in the cinema, and videos were barely accessible to me (imagine!) back in that antidiluvian era, but my bigger cousins loved it (esp those with shiny eyes for Harrison Ford). By the time i got to see it probably 10 or 15 years later, it just was not so shockingly new - less the tech than the atmosphere - the grubby dystopia had been done endlessly, though perhaps less well, in countless other movies.
    Also i was an avid 2000ad reader and so maybe grubby dystopias and gritty antiheroes weren’t that much of a shocker anyhow.

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