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Thread: Best Writing on William Blake

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    The prophetic books are not simple. I dont understand them. They are too hArd. I've been trying to read them for almost 20 years, and failing. Why not try the marriage of heaven and hell. That's neither simple nor incomprehensible
    ive nailed these now. do that all day reading of Jerusalem for Blakes birthday really opened everything up for me.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    told ya
    I was so young then! So callow

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  4. #18
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    As Frye explains in an interview, Blake arrives for him in a revelation while he was a graduate student:

    Frye: ...I was assigned a paper on Blake’s Milton, one of his most difficult and complex poems, and started working on it the night before I was to read it. It was around three in the morning when suddenly the universe just broke open, and I’ve never been, as they say, the same since.

    Cayley: What was it? I know you can’t describe the experience, but what was it in Blake that provoked this experience?

    Frye: Just the feeling of an enormous number of things making sense that had been scattered and unrelated before. In other words, it was a mytholog*ical frame taking hold.


    This in itself ramps up the weirdness level. Frye was not not the only author or Blake scholar whose insights into the prophet-poet were gained in a flash of vision. Allen Ginsberg, writing about the origins of the sixties counterculture, explains that S. Foster Damon, author of A Blake Dictionary and also a pioneer of Blake criticism, had his own Blakean revelation while tripping on peyote and stumbling wide-eyed across the Harvard green:

    One scholar who transmitted Blake's kabbalah, S. Foster Damon, can remember his sudden vision of tiny flowers carpeting Harvard Yard violet before World War One, an image that lingers over 60 years in mind since his fellow student Virgil Thomson gave him the cactus Peyote to eat. Damon concludes that rare beings like Blake are born with physiologic gift of such vision, continuous or intermittent.


    Added to all this is that Ginsberg also was inspired to continue his poetic explorations because of an auditory epiphany involving the voice of Blake. The master poet, seer of numerous visions, apparently also has the power to bestow visions from the beyond to those that deeply contemplate his work. Frye's Fearful Symmetry occasionally also takes on the tone of a channeled text.
    *

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    He had learned from Jacob Boehme and from old alchemist writers that imagination was the first emanation of divinity, ‘the body of God,’ ‘the Divine members,’ and he drew the deduction, which they did not draw, that the imaginative arts were therefore the greatest of Divine revelations, and that the sympathy with all living things, sinful and righteous alike, which the imaginative arts awaken, is that forgiveness of sins commanded by Christ. The reason, and by the reason he meant deductions from the observations of the senses, binds us to mortality because it binds us to the senses, and divides us from each other by showing us our clashing interests; but imagination divides us from mortality by the immortality of beauty, and binds us to each other by opening the secret doors of all hearts. He cried again and again that every thing that lives is holy, and that nothing is unholy except things that do not live—lethargies, and cruelties, and timidities, and that denial of imagination which is the root they grew from in old times. Passions, because most living, are most holy—and this was a scandalous paradox[134] in his time—and man shall enter eternity borne upon their wings.

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/49613...h.htm#Page_131

  8. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    *
    Where else did I encounter that opinion lately? Was it in 'The Doors of Perception'? Probably. The idea that drugs can help the more neurotypical ppl get where Blake got while he was brushing his teeth in the morning.

  9. #22
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    I regularly walk past Blake's grave in Bunhill Fields. It's a new headstone but I don't know the full story here.

  10. #23
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    William Blake society did research on actual burial plot (old stone didn't mark the grave. It was just a memorial) then raised funds for a new stone.

  11. #24
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    'Passions, because most living, are most holy'

    this is where i connect Blake and Bluka.

  12. #25
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    "I must create a system or be enslaved by another mans; I will not reason and compare: my business is to create."

    Jerusalem.e.p10.100.jpg

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    Without contraries is no progression. Attraction and repulsion, reason and energy, love and hate, are necessary to human existence.

    From these contraries spring what the religious call Good and Evil. Good is the passive that obeys reason; Evil is the active springing from Energy.

    Good is heaven. Evil is hell.

  14. #27
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    Was skimming Yeats on Blake's "Divine Comedy" illustrations last night and it seems very useful in communicating Blake's philosophy; early on Yeats differentiates symbol from allegory very handily, the essential difference being that symbol expresses what is otherwise inexpressible, whereas allegory simply assigns an easily understood image to an easily understood abstraction.

  15. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    from http://groupnameforgrapejuice.blogsp...hild-me-3.html
    the best essay ever written by mortal man.
    How did you find this blog?

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