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Thread: plants, they exist

  1. #16
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    When I was about 5, I asked my mum why she talked to the plants and she said it was because they grew if you talked to them.

    About an hour later I was found in the greenhouse standing in front of the plants chanting
    "Die. Die. Die. Die".

    To this day I just have to look at a plant and it withers, I wish I was better with them. I recently bought a plant for the windowsill and put it out and the next day it wasn't there. I looked down and it was lying on the ground, it had jumped off the sill and committed suicide rather than be around me.

  2. #17
    nomadologist Guest

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    Hehe, Sloane, I can almost picture that.

    This is probably another huge strike against me in dissensians' eyes, but I've never much cared for plants indoors. I can appreciate natural beauty when it's outside, or enframed by a Frank Lloyd Wright home with a creek running over it that blends into the landscape, but I've always hated potted plants indoors. Maybe it's the association with dentists and other ugly utilitarian office spaces, the tackiness of them. It always looks better to me when spaces like that accept their manmade fate and do the ultra-contemporary (if without imagination, at least clean lines and tranquil organizational principles at work) decor with maybe some vases full of weird abstract wooden sticks or something if absolutely necessary (to ground us in our biology, I guess?). Potted plants also smack of that whole "zoo" thing where I fail to see how containing nature so artificially for human enjoyment is doing nature any favors. (You love dogs so much? Is that why you keep it imprisoned all day in your apartment, just to anticipate getting walked in your handbag once a day for 10 minutes?)

    I'm also allergic to pollens, maybe that's my problem...

  3. #18
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    Vertical Gardens by Patrick Blanc
    www.verticalgardenpatrickblanc.com






  4. #19
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    That's pretty cool.

  5. #20
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    Jeff Koons' giant Chia Pet.


  6. #21
    nomadologist Guest

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    the U.K. has chia pets, too?? hehe i always thought that was just a weird north american thing

  7. #22
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    No, I just saw one on Wayne's World.

  8. #23
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    just to remind myself how much i love botanical gardens. the peculiar structures, the humidity, the elderly couples, the weird plants and all that.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruno View Post
    there was this one time i lived with people and relationships were severely strained, a very depressing time. when this happened i noticed the few plants we had stopped growing or whithered and died. this was the exact moment i realised they were living things. to be fair i didn't notice my brother and sisters existed until fairly late too but plants were always outside my field of vision, even when i was surrounded by them. i think it's to do with pace. plants seem lifeless to young people and we must seem a blur to them always.

    if gardening is about an affinity with plants, a partnership, my gran's garden was a wild love affair. the house was always littered with sachets of seeds smuggled from different places, waiting to take root in her care. i remember the front and especially the back of the house, a dense oasis of ferns, flowers, delicate plants and an apricot tree, light piercing through the foliage. the toolshed was overgrown, everything was overgrown, but in a harmonious way. in her last years nurses and daughters began to discourage my gran's forays into the garden, and so it lost its colour and her mind faded away. today the garden is at the hands of my aunt and it is more organised, more neatly defined than it ever was with gran. a reflection of the way people shape things around them but more, i think, of how plants react to people.
    did all of the plants died during this conflict? what i like about plants is that even when they look like on the verge of breaking, are devoid of all color and left without a leaf, it still is possible to bring them back to life. regulate the water intake or change the amount of direct sunlight. a good reminder to take good care of yourself and other people too. it will show effect.

    the way you write about your gran's garden is very vivid and makes me dreamy. how does the garden look like now?

    i'll go and look for a fern in the weekend, they're kinda magic aren't they?

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by yyaldrin View Post
    a fern
    I had one that was hard to take care of and it died

    I really like the ones that grow spontaneously on damp walls e.g. under railway bridges


    apprently this one's called

    Maidenhair Spleenwort -Asplenium trichomanes

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by sufi View Post
    I had one that was hard to take care of and it died
    or at least it started out as a couple of strands - cuttings, then thrived til it was like like a big handsome afro, then died shedding a mess of tiny crispy frondles
    maybe they are annuals?

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