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Thread: Cheese. the rival thread.

  1. #16
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    that halloumi is good. fried cheese.

    i go to that neals yeard place. i read in the standard that theres a good cheese shop in bethnal green. anyone been to that. i don't mind admitting to being intimidated by those sorts of places. feel a bit plebbish and like i'm going to be sneered at for not being able to pronounce things properly and that. a bit like people might feel about independent record shops or whatever. i break outin a sweat and that, get all nervous and self-conscious.

  2. #17
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    Indeed, Macabre Cheese.

  3. #18
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    halloumi is pretty much impossible to mess up i think, in any cheap eatery setting. and saganaki in any caff.

    not being someone who gets all moist-eyed about cheeses and knows all the right pairings (my old man, for one), or, indeed, knows about cheese other than a very narrow prism of what he likes, it must be said my favourite use of cheese is probably in a quesadilla (esp. the classic 'big chicken' variety, using any old cheese of the swiss/pepper jack/American/Colby etc. type) or in chiles rellenos (green poblano peppers, Chihuahua cheese stuffed in all over the shop: sorted)
    actually, jalapeno poppers too please, with some sort of dip.

    Philip's concern he sounds parochial over a love of some Applewood product makes me worried.

    if he is parochial, i'm bloody insular with my adoration for a nice crumbly Cheshire on me toast... ...it has been years since i have even ate any brie.

  4. #19
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    Default cheese experiment

    OK any nominations for which cheese to put in me sarnie this lunchtime
    there is a well stocked deli within 100m of here....

    in the interests of research i am willing to test any cheese available in brixton, submissions by post also accepted
    mmmm

    (i'm hungry so be QUICK)

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenks
    went on holiday near pont l'eveque a couple of years ago - made the error of driving back with a complete cheese, by calais we were glad to get out of the car - it was torture all the way back from Dover.
    surprised no-one's mentioned Neal's Yard dairy - one in covent garden but also one near borough market - mail order cheese (now there's a thing you need money for luka)
    In driving back to UK with Cheese I've found that returning to the car after fuel/coffee stop is the problem. Only then do you realise you've been couped up with a foul lactic miasma for 100's of k's.

  6. #21
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    [QUOTE=sufi]OK any nominations for which cheese to put in me sarnie this lunchtime
    there is a well stocked deli within 100m of here....QUOTE]

    Your sock, Sufi?

  7. #22
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    too late
    you were all too slow
    i ended up with generic chevre which was delish

    still plenty of time for nominations for friday lunch? any advance on Gerard's thoughtful offer?

  8. #23
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    I dunno if this is a well known combo, but my sister in law made me a brie and grape croissant a little while ago, which came about as far out of left field as I can imagine, but it was sensational. Anyone else tried this?

  9. #24
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    brie and grape, yeah, a bloke called steve who i do some work for sometimes does this for me, in a sandwich not a croissant. i think sainsburys do it too. its good.

  10. #25
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    Gorgonzola and beetroot for lunch on friday.

    Has anyone else ever been to La Fromagerie? They've got two outlets, one in town and the other up at Highbury Barn. It's a bit poncy but the range and quality is outstanding. For English cheeses Paxton & Whitfield on Jermyn Street is very good.

    Picking one favourite cheese is almost impossible and wholly unecessary but I cannot let this thread continue without mentioning Montgomery's cheddar. It crushes all other cheddars.

  11. #26
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    Vacherin

    Have enjoyed the above baked a number of times. Ate at room temp. for the first time over New Year. The singular most intensely lovely cheese experience I've ever had. Really quite unforgettable. I only stopped when there was no more room in my arteries

  12. #27
    be.jazz Guest

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    How much mould is too much? In a super-market recently (can't remember if it was in France or Belgium) we came across some cheese covered in layers of mould that looked pretty much like your homemade back-of-the-cupboard variety. It was like picking up a long-forgotten piece of bread, scraping off the mould and eating it. I thought that was a bit much.

  13. #28
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    I ate some spanish "blue" cheese once that was actually green. It fizzed on your tongue. I wouldnt go past that again

    I had another spanish blue that was wrapped in leaves recently and I've heard of cheese wrapped in nettles. It sound a bit faddish but has anyone partaken?

  14. #29
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    Nettle cheese is called Yarg. Worth it just for the name I think. It's Cornish, and pretty nice. Hard, slightly crumbly texture, but a deceptively light flavour. Almost refreshing - use it as a granité between courses of Stilton and Roquefort perhaps.

  15. #30
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    Talking Generation Fromage

    My first post. (well almost) Lurking on this forum for many months. I have felt little compunction to post , being aware that I was saving you all from my troll like behaviour and rabid rants. Cheese tho............now I 'm posting. I have been off the cheese for many years now, giving my arteries a rest and If I am entirely honest, due to excessive use, the law of diminishing returns had come in to play. In my heyday, the Restaurateur who left me with his board of cheese would think himself foolish and find himself out of pocket by the time I had left the table.
    My first real foray in to the cheese world (well, Tesco medium cheddar doesn’t really cut it does it) was a simple but very potent unpasteurised Brie. The sensorial rush (I aint kiddin ya) which it invoked shocked me initially, being closer to the effect of a narcotic than a food. More opiate than stimulant, the effect was one I would chase for many years. My peak cheese experience if you like.
    As I have said I have been off cheese for many years now but there is one, which still sits on my wants list, waiting to be tasted, Casu Marzu. I was never scared of scrapping off rancid moulds and rinds, in fact the more repugnant the state of the cheese the better. However Casu Marzu is, as iam sure many of you are aware a step beyond a little mould
    "According to Yaroslav Trefimov of The Wall Street Journal, Casu Marzu, Sardinia's favourite black market treat, begins with a local cheese called Pecorino, which is left out in the sun, so that nearby barn-flies can deposit their larvae into it, until it becomes overpopulated with a swarming mass of maggots. The enzymes "produced" by the maggots cause the cheese to ferment, which, in turn, decomposes the fats, creating a living culinary delight."
    Trefimov describes the viscous larval bomb as a rotten tasting, pungent goo that burns the tongue, and can also affect other parts of the body. Moreover, the lively maggots are far more entertaining than dull cherries suspended in Jell-O, as the creatures continuously leap from the cheese as you eat it. Part of the ritualistic ceremony involves covering the mess with the hand, to keep the little buggers from snapping into the eyeballs with "ballistic precision."
    I should think that I would have to go to Italy to try this cheese even though it is illegal there.I'd like to think that there was an Italian deli in somewhere like Clerkenwell that has a supply 'under the counter' but I suspect not. So, I am after info. Really. Has anyone tasted it? More to the point does anybody know were I can find some any closer than Italy?

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