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  1. #1
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    Default That film about Joe Strummer

    by Julien Temple

    it's actually quite good. a bit corny in places. the campfire motif was nice but occasionally corny (those people under the brooklyn bridge, had a bit of a groan there, they looked like twats)

    really liked the way people's names weren't listed

    great black and white footage from the first LP by temple back in the day.

    HATED bono. god i really thought his portentous overbearing nature had a very bright light shone on it in the context.

    couldn't care less about the mescaleros, but it was nice to see the walker soundtrack and permanent record mentioned.

    nothing about rock against the rich (eek)

    as i very often mention joe used to say hi to me in and around the portobello (c1989) when i was a screwed-up litle thing. he was always dead sweet, very tender. a certain bit of the film (they remark that he was very depressed) really reminded me of him, and i suppose inevitably (groan) where my head used to be at.

    did anyone else bump into him?

    -

    also strange how for a while acid house made a story like his kinda redundant for a period.

  2. #2
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    Not seen it, although intend to.

    What do you mean by
    Quote Originally Posted by WOEBOT View Post
    also strange how for a while acid house made a story like his kinda redundant for a period.
    by the way?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Not seen it, although intend to.

    What do you mean by

    by the way?
    well rock is back isn't it? during rave/acid things like the clash just seemed totally old hat.

    there's a bit in the film with strummer talking about rave to richard jobson under the westway, actually eulogising it, and he says: "there's so many styles, new styles every week....intellechno" and eek, hearing that term "intellechno"- i mean, who ever said that, what a ghastly word, and coming from his lips, eek, sheer embarassment.

    sfunny cos shane macgowan was massively into acid house as well. wanted to release a 30 minute rave track about getting in touch with your inner god, but the label wouldnt put it out.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by WOEBOT View Post
    well rock is back isn't it? during rave/acid things like the clash just seemed totally old hat.
    I'm not entirely sure I agree with that. During rave/acid there was a parallel "madchester" rock scene and after a heavy Thursday/Friday/Saturday of repetitive beats we'd often go to the Sunday indie discos (admittedly mainly for the cheap pints and student chicks) and it was also a time when Rock bands were influenced by the house scene and vice versa.

    I think I got more switched on to Rolling Stones/Clash through the influences of Primal Scream and Andrew Weatherall than at any time previously. Think of all the Weatherall remixes of rock bands - my mind has gone a bit blank but "My Bloody Valentine - Glider" sticks out.

    Lol, thats how I remember it but my head is fuzzy

  5. #5
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    Agree with Woebot here. Most of the early DJs and a large proportion of the early audience (early 1988) in the south east came from the pre-house soul/funk/jazz scene which existed in a parallel universe to the canonical rock scene. Robert Elms (I think) went as far as to call the acid explosion "the triumph pf the suburban soul boy". Just about the only white "rock" act I can remember being played on the pirates (JFM/Solar etc) and it being "ok to like" (bit of a rockist canoninical term there) were Steely Dan/Donald Fagen ('The Nightfly' was always massive) because of the jazz influences. Everything else was if it was thought about at all was brushed off as "student music".
    Obviously as the scene took off a load of people came in from the "rock" scene (for want of a better word) but I always got the feeling that once they arrived at least for the early honeymoon period rock was a bit of an embarrassment and they fully immersed themselves in the new acid/house music.
    Added to that were thousands of people (often younger and who became the 'ardcore massive a couple of years later) who previous to the dance scene wouldnt have taken more than a passing interest in music of any kind.
    If rock seeped into the early 88/89 scene at all it was usually stuff that the NME (which surely thought it administered the rock canon at the at point) wouldnt have touched with a barge pole...Steve Hillage/Pink Floyd "Echoes" (big in the Spectrum/Land of Oz chillout room or the occasional house mix of stuff like "Big Love" by Fleetwood Mac (that was extremely early on).
    The so called Madchester scene had precisely no impact on the scene in the south east as far as I can remember and I find the whole lumping in of this with the revolution that was acid house as rock revisionism of the worst kind. A lame attempt to stake a claim on something which had made the rock press irrelevant. Only possible due to the Hacienda's unfortunate rock connections and previous life and maybe because of Sean Ryder in some ways being an embodiment of the ethos.
    To be honest though I can't speak for the scene in the north west but i doubt the big Blackburn parties were wall to wall "baggy anthems" either.

    And back down south at the big orbital parties or The Trip, Sin, Rage or Clink Street can anyone seriously imagine the Stone Roses being played?More chance of them playing the Bay City Rollers...
    Last edited by DRMHCP; 21-06-2007 at 10:25 AM. Reason: added a bit

  6. #6
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    He means everyone was too twatted to adhere to the normal conventions of canonical rock as laid down by Q Magazine.


  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by WOEBOT View Post
    as i very often mention joe used to say hi to me in and around the portobello (c1989) when i was a screwed-up litle thing.
    More importantly than my first post ^^ mad props for that alone

  8. #8

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    @ DRMHCP Perhaps I misunderstood the original post and perhaps my reply was a little simplistic for you Dissensus connoisseurs.

    I didn't come from a Rock background - I went straight from no real musical taste or preference into acid house. From the influences of certain DJ's - namely Weatherall I developed a taste, at that time, for a number of different "rock" bands. That was all I was trying to say. Also I said, I think, that the Madchester scene ran in parrallel - and although the crowds for each mostly didn't mix there were some crossover tunes.

    What I disagreed with was this line:

    > during rave/acid things like the clash just seemed totally old hat

    Certainly not if you were a follower of Weatherall and the other alternative acid DJ's. And yes I can recall clearly The Clash being played at The Trip.

    "The Trip and Clink St" - props to you Sir for just lightening my Thursday at the mere mention of those names.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blubeat View Post
    @ DRMHCP Perhaps I misunderstood the original post and Certainly not if you were a follower of Weatherall and the other alternative acid DJ's. And yes I can recall clearly The Clash being played at The Trip.

    "The Trip and Clink St" - props to you Sir for just lightening my Thursday at the mere mention of those names.
    forgot about this thread!
    yes I think we were at cross purposes...I suppose the Andrew Weatherall scene ploughed its own furrow from the beginning...I can't really comment as I didn't go to any of his nights...and to be honest he used to slag off the other (vast majority) side of the scene quite a bit. Always found him/the Boys Own crew interesting to read but way too elitist eg all this talk of being an Acid Ted if you werent one of some tiny west end in-crowd.
    Re the Clash and Trip you must have been quite surprised to hear it there that night and surely there were a lot of bemused punters as it must have stuck out a mile. But then they used to play "The Ovalteenies" at the Windsor Safari nights way back too
    Last edited by DRMHCP; 28-06-2007 at 10:38 PM. Reason: sidetracked ridiculously!

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    The Clash and the scene around them helped invent acid house. Mick Jones especially was a crucial link. Oh how people forget their history.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2stepfan View Post
    The Clash and the scene around them helped invent acid house. Mick Jones especially was a crucial link. Oh how people forget their history.
    The Clash helped to invent reggae as well, y'know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2stepfan View Post
    The Clash and the scene around them helped invent acid house. Mick Jones especially was a crucial link. Oh how people forget their history.
    big audio dynamite released a record on def jam. it was the only record that swapped up the early red and black sleeves of the first 10 records - released in 1985 it was pink and black leopard skin, produced by rick rubin, funny eh?


    i never liked the clash at all, i never have, i'm sorry about that i just can't find a thing i like about them, i used to listen to big audio dynamite tho, maybe i'm a bit too young for the clash.

    i'm not sure how they really helped invent acid house but i can see how the instinct passes on, some of the players, and some of the attitude.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mms View Post
    i'm not sure how they really helped invent acid house but i can see how the instinct passes on, some of the players, and some of the attitude.
    I'm sure I saw some documentary with some mouthy DJ (Dave Clark, maybe?) saying how loads of '88 ravers had been into The Clash. Although there was some other DJ on there saying it was bollocks. Anyone remember this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2stepfan View Post
    The Clash and the scene around them helped invent acid house. Mick Jones especially was a crucial link. Oh how people forget their history.
    From someone who was there (on the English side of it) I don't remember the slightest link between The Clash and Acid House and as far as the American originators went and as someone's already said if it was influenced by anything European it was the obvious Kraftwerk, obscure euro-disco and a bit of English New Romantic type synth pop.
    As someone else said surely we have to admit the white guitar band was completely irrelevant to this movement.

    Also surely as John Eden said the average punk back in 1988 hated the scene because it wasnt "real music" (just what their hippy predecessors had once said about punk but at least they were "all rockers together" deep down and so the hate wasnt maybe quite as vitriolic as it was to a scene that in 1988 threatened to not fight against all the old rock verities but totally ignore them).

    Funny enough just before I moved back up here I was in a pub in High Wycombe which used to play dance music and which clubbers used to use to score pills etc but which sometimes had a live band on a stage round the back. It was an old local punk band (from 1976/77) reunion and i remember the lead singer 8 or so years after 1988/89 taking time out between songs to slag off with real venom the dance music scene which he must have still seen as some kind of threat.
    Last edited by DRMHCP; 28-06-2007 at 11:09 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRMHCP View Post
    As someone else said surely we have to admit the white guitar band was completely irrelevant to this movement.
    Except to say that some people in guitar bands were into house at that time and helped to spread the word and vibe to their audiences.

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