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  1. #1
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    Default Walking in the city

    Fabulous piece in the Standard on Tuesday which found that, to no surprise of those of us who do like to walk in the city, walking was actually quicker than the tube for seven common London routes.

    Unlike the forms of exercise favoured by Kapitalism (quick energy burns in the gym so that you are fit for work the next day), walking is a form of energetic activity which has no relation to work whatsoever. Those arch opponents of work, the situationists, were correct to settle on 'aimless walking' (the derrive) as a strategy against zombie consumerism. There is no product, no goal; walking is the very defintion of a plateau.

  2. #2
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    me and my mate paul have this disease when we meet up in london. we plan to walk somewhere, usually somewhere that's very easy to find really, and always get hopelessly lost for hours, but it's brilliant and we like it.

  3. #3
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    I still got lost in Soho whenever I go to shops down there (for records, obviously). I will never figure it out, but I quite like the adventure of it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diggedy Derek
    I still got lost in Soho whenever I go to shops down there (for records, obviously). I will never figure it out, but I quite like the adventure of it.

    got lost in soho for 3 hours last night just trying to find beak street.

  5. #5
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    Reminds me that I need to dig out my W Benjamin books again.

    http://www.othervoices.org/gpeaker/Flaneur.html

  6. #6
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    I always get lost in Soho too! What is it about Soho that makes that happen do you think?

    The other place I'm hopeless at is Bloomsbury --- all those Squares --- I'll never fathom it lol ---

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by k-punk
    Unlike the forms of exercise favoured by Kapitalism (quick energy burns in the gym so that you are fit for work the next day), walking is a form of energetic activity which has no relation to work whatsoever. Those arch opponents of work, the situationists, were correct to settle on 'aimless walking' (the derrive) as a strategy against zombie consumerism. There is no product, no goal; walking is the very defintion of a plateau.
    If you're going to take a totally eurocentric view, then yeah. Where I live, walking is oppression. Every step is sweaty, sticky pain and a reminder of your lowly status as others zoom past in their air conditioned cabs. Nobody in Asia would walk anywhere unless they had to (unless you're talking temperate northern countries like Japan).

    Of course me, I'm the one in the air conditioned cab so it's kind of irrelevant, but thought I'd point it out.

    I think canals are the walker's secret weapon. They're these instant shortcuts that are barred to any other form of transport and they slice right through the middle of any major british city. When I lived by the canal by Victoria Park I walked everywhere. And you get all sorts of little glimpses of nature by the canal too. Like the dead eels that build up by the locks every few weeks. Anybody know why that happens?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backjob
    If you're going to take a totally eurocentric view, then yeah. Where I live, walking is oppression. Every step is sweaty, sticky pain and a reminder of your lowly status as others zoom past in their air conditioned cabs. Nobody in Asia would walk anywhere unless they had to (unless you're talking temperate northern countries like Japan).
    So you're taking a southern asianocentric view, then?

    Surely it's not only in Europe that walking is liberatory. I know people who live in China and they enjoy walking.

    Newsflash: in the UK, every step is a reminder of your lowly status too, as ppl zoom by in their big cars. But who wants to be in the ruling class?

  9. #9
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    Most of the time walking in London, actually I feel pretty damn superior to the mugs sat in their cars going nowhere in traffic.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by k-punk
    Newsflash: in the UK, every step is a reminder of your lowly status too, as ppl zoom by in their big cars. But who wants to be in the ruling class?
    Cycling is redemption. I had to leave London because cycling shrank the place so much and there was nowhere left to go on my trusty steed. Having a big electric motor laced into the front wheel didn't help.
    Last edited by HMGovt; 03-02-2005 at 09:11 AM.

  11. #11
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    i've got a bike but i'm too scared to ride it. the traffic intimidates me. i need someone to coax me out.

  12. #12
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    Buy a helmet.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by k-punk View Post
    Fabulous piece in the Standard on Tuesday which found that, to no surprise of those of us who do like to walk in the city, walking was actually quicker than the tube for seven common London routes.

    Unlike the forms of exercise favoured by Kapitalism (quick energy burns in the gym so that you are fit for work the next day), walking is a form of energetic activity which has no relation to work whatsoever. Those arch opponents of work, the situationists, were correct to settle on 'aimless walking' (the derrive) as a strategy against zombie consumerism. There is no product, no goal; walking is the very defintion of a plateau.
    (resurrecting this old thread)

    Walking *is* very good exercise.

    People should walk more.

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