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Thread: H P Lovecraft

  1. #91
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  2. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Not to brag or nut'n, but I've been in contact with S. T. Joshi and one of my stories from last December is coming out in the next edition of his Spectral Realms poetry anthology.
    This is great... you got a link to it?

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by you View Post
    This is great... you got a link to it?
    Oh don't worry, I'll spam it good and hard when it appears! It'll be in the winter issue (Realms is a biannual), so I'm guessing early next year some time.

    Edit: looks like your book is coming out just before Christmas - nice one! I see it's on pre-order at Am***n.
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  4. #94

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    cool, let me know when it drops. Yeah Dec 15th... there are some related essays on the repeater blog.

    I finished the Penguin Ligotti book over the summer. I really do enjoy his work. I'm just mad jealous of his skill. I enjoy him much more than HPL, have to say. **dodges necronomicon projectile**

  5. #95
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    Ligotti is certainly, in some sense, a far superior writer to Lovecraft. But that's a bit like saying Einstein's physics was more advanced than Newton's. It's like, yeah it is, but of course it is. Shoulders of giants, and all that.
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  6. #96

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    Well, I wouldn't say one is superior/better to the other. Just that I tend to enjoy and relish Ligotti much more - whereas HPL can feel like a slog. But oddly, not because Ligotti is 'easier' - his style can be taken as being kinda wordy and convoluted in a way... I don't know why, it is not the same difference as enjoying a contemporary writer over Dickens or Dostoevsky. In fact, I'd say I enjoy Ligotti over other horror writers who use easier prose styles. But Ligotti just..draws me in, into that cloacal bleakness behind the veil that is this world... (sorry...)

  7. #97
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    Interesting point about the convoluted nature of Ligotti's prose. Lovecraft of course has all these stock phrases he uses over and over again with minor variation, but Ligotti lampshades* this by using the same phrasing multiple times in a single story with no variation. And where it could be annoying and gimmicky in the hands of a less skilled writer, I find it works very well. Certainly complies with Lovecraft's dictum to avoid realism at all costs.

    *this term will be familiar to anyone who's spent any time browsing TVTropes.org - well worth a look (and a gloriously wasted afternoon) if you haven't
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  8. #98
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    I find ligotti a bit too detached and obtuse (and conversely somewhat obvious) at times myself. Re-read 'Teatro Grottesco' and 'my work is not yet done' and was definitely less whelmed than the first time round (though the short codas at the end of 'work' are still great). Ligotti seems to have a real aversion to the visceral and the manipulative techniques most horror writers use - to his detriment at times (but I guess that's what makes him 'literary').

    Ive bigged him up a few times, but Adam Nevill's recent short story collection is outstanding - and it was given away for free to subscribers - this link may work. http://dl.bookfunnel.com/tczxvugqj4 Really unsettling - especially 'doll hands'.

    Think I mentioned John Langan's 'fisherman' somewhere above, but you should both read it. Fantastic, semi-scholcky but darkly resonant nautical Lovecraft business.

  9. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by droid View Post

    Ive bigged him up a few times, but Adam Nevill's recent short story collection is outstanding - and it was given away for free to subscribers - this link may work. http://dl.bookfunnel.com/tczxvugqj4 Really unsettling - especially 'doll hands'.
    I picked up The Ritual and Rats. Quite enjoyed both. Did seem kinda 'light'. But I think I prefer short stories in horror. I read short stories generally more and more. I'll probably get that Nevill collection when it comes out, thanks for the tip!

  10. #100
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    H.P. Lovecraft was the forefather of modern horror fiction having inspired such writers as Stephen King, Robert Bloch and Neil Gaiman. The influence of his Cthulhu mythos can be seen in film (Re-Animator, Hellboy, and Alien), games (The Call of Cthulhu role playing enterprise), music (Metallica, Iron Maiden) and pop culture in general. But what led an Old World, xenophobic gentleman to create one of literature's most far-reaching mythologies? What attracts even the minds of the 21st century to these stories of unspeakable abominations and cosmic gods? LOVECRAFT: FEAR OF THE UNKNOWN is a chronicle of the life, work and mind that created these weird tales as told by many of today's luminaries of dark fantasy including John Carpenter, Guillermo Del Toro, Neil Gaiman, Stuart Gordon , Caitlin Kiernan, and Peter Straub.

  11. #101
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    Documentary is fairly cheesy in places (and is that what Lovecraft is supposed to have sounded like? Cos that guy sounds ridiculous) but has some clever people talking about Lovecraft in it, and as someone who doesn't know much about Lovecraft's life it was dashed educational to boot.

    Really hammers home the inability of artists to capture what makes Lovecraft's creatures sinister. A giant octopus headed God wading towards shore just looks kind of hokey.

  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Really hammers home the inability of artists to capture what makes Lovecraft's creatures sinister. A giant octopus headed God wading towards shore just looks kind of hokey.
    Have you seen the HPL Historical Society Call of Cthulhu film? I don't know if it's 'scary' as such, but it's pretty effective, I thought. It's done using a technique they called 'Mythoscope', which is intended to mimic the special effects that would have been available in the 1920s (i.e. it's stop-motion based, no CGI) and is also a silent movie, with a music soundtrack and text screens to represent the (scarce) dialogue.

    The same guys did a 'talkie' a few years later, based on 'The Whisperer in Darkness', which was okaaay, although they greatly extended the story and made the narrator character a bit more of an 'action man' (not very Lovecraftian) and also caved in and use CGI, which was a bit of a cop-out, I thought.

    There's meant to be a very effective German adaptation of 'The Colour out of Space', titled simply Die Farbe, though I've not seen it.
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  13. #103
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    The Colour Out of Space I can see being done well, because you don't really see anything but the effect of the aliens, right?

    I've heard of those films but not seen them.

    I read a bit of the Alan Moore comic based on Lovecraft and found it extremely disturbing and nasty. More so than Lovecraft's own stories, actually.

  14. #104
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    Does anyone else automatically picture Guillermo Del Toro wasting his ample sarcasm on a nonplussed Bart Simpson any time they see a photo/footage of him?
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