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Thread: Painting

  1. #1
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    Default Painting

    Well, this is supposed to be Art as well as Lit and Film but Art is never discussed.

    I tend to go check out the London based art stuff cos that is near where i live.

    This week i went to the Constable and Hodgkin at Tate Briain and then the drawing room at the British Museum (my favourite rooms - always great stuff there - Rembrandt drawings/etchings, early french drawings and Avigdor Arikha drawings).

    the Constables were a real revelation. In particular, the sketches showing a genuine link between what appears to be choc box landscapes and the roots of impressionism. The sketches are often as exciting (if not more so) then the finished pieces. Maybe I am being parochial but the 4 versions of Hadleigh Castle are worth the admission alone.

    the Hodgkin was more difficult to judge - it seems to me that when he gets it right he is exceptionally moving but when it goes wrong he is no better than a sixth former experimenting wth abstraction - really evident in the last room.

    want to see the kandinsky but thinking maybe it will disappoint, feel the same about the Mogdig at the RA

    Nothing much has been as good as the re-organising of the Rembrandts in the National, though. Good gracious, he was good!!!!

    any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Only a decade late.

    I was never much into visual art (well, only photography) until recently, but I've had a bit of a revelation in recent months. Seeing the van Goghs at the National Gallery and this at the Tate:



    I felt like I appreciated their there-ness as works of art for the first time. Rather than going to an art gallery as a kind of middle class penance, not really 'getting' it and feeling worthy but bemused. Which I had done periodically for years, without getting an awful lot out of it.

    It helped that the Tate Britain collection from the 19th/early 20th centuries is stellar. Perhaps also that I began to draw again last year, after many years of not having done so.

    Dunno much about Constable or Hodgkin I'm afraid, but the Rembrandts at the National are indeed great.

    Liking Samuel Turner's work a lot, too (somehow contrived to miss his works at the Tate though):

    Last edited by baboon2004; 27-06-2017 at 01:38 PM.

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  4. #3
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    Expecting a third contributor to this thread in 2028, then.

  5. #4
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    The National Gallery might be my favourite place in London. Also Tate Britain, Victoria and Albert Museum. The British Museum for ancient art.

    Baboon if you like Van Gogh I recommend going to the Courtald Gallery in Somerset House near the Strand. Lots of great impressionist stuff in there along with all the Rubens, Gainsborough, Van Dyck, etc.

    This Van Gogh painting 'Peach Trees in Blossom' struck me as particularly miraculous when I went there a month or so ago. And you can't understand it properly without actually seeing it, because the paint is so thickly daubed on. It has real texture to it.



    I would recommend 'The Story of Art' by Ernst Gombrich to anybody wanting to get into painting and art. It's the perfect entry point IMO cos it teaches you to see the beauty and ingenuity in art, it teaches you to LOOK, while guiding you through the historical developments through the centuries.

    A few random ones:



    Titian - The Flaying of Marsyas 1575



    Rubens - The Descent from the Cross 1612-1614



    Rembrandy - Simeon's Song of Praise 1669

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  7. #5
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    Nice post - 16th and 17th century usually not my era of choice, but I like that Titian.

    The Cortauld Gallery is actually next on my list, next time I have a spare afternoon in London. With the van Goghs, as you say - the texture! The one I liked at the National was a simple landscape at Auvers, but it was mesmeric. And on the subject of van Gogh's own history, I really recommend watching Lust for Life with Kirk Douglas.

    Will check The Story of Art for sure, thanks. I just started watching The Way of Seeing on youtube, so will get hold of the book of that, too.

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