Page 2 of 17 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 255

Thread: Actioning a blue-skies approach outside the box

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    869

    Default

    I was asked in a meeting:

    "In terms of a drink, what would you like?


    "In terms of" is horrid and used all the time.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lichen View Post
    I was asked in a meeting:

    "In terms of a drink, what would you like?


    "In terms of" is horrid and used all the time.
    it's basically the same question twice.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    7,690

    Default

    "Marketing speak is the worst, marketing is a fairly simple thing, but there is so much jargon associated with it now, i think this is because people go to university to learn this kind of subject so to sit alongside other subjects that have alot of meaningless but encouraged jargon (continental philosophy for example), it invents words to emphasize that the subject is serious and worthy of three years academic study."
    I'm sure that this is pretty accurate. Ironic that disciplines that ought to be about increasing communication have surrounded themselves in inpenetrable jargon that ultimately serve only to work against the professed aim.

    "Plus, being sent on training courses can make workers feel rewarded/valued so if someone spends a day out of the office learning all this shit there is maybe a double whammy."
    I dunno, I think that most people who are sent on these courses are smart enough to see through this kind of nonsense. The best way to make someone who is on low wages feel more valued is to pay them more but it's a lot cheaper to just send them on a course and tell them that that means they're highly valued.

    "good question. it's fair to say that the prevalance of management consultants and management speak has emerged in the last 20 years, right? surely there can't be a genuine belief in those circles that talking like that increases productivity"
    To what extent does consultancy in general increase productivity, efficiency etc? I can believe that there are ways in which improvements are made but the amount of money that is spent by our government on consultants these days is so large that I find it hard to imagine that it works out as a net benefit.
    I always think of a consultant for a business as something analogous to a psychoanalyst for a person - maybe can be a good idea in the short term but can often lead to a long term and destructive dependency. Plus both types tend to talk a load of bollocks obviously.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Merseyside
    Posts
    3,546

    Default

    My manager is always going on about how we need to break away from the unchallenged assumptions of the traditional "rockist" view of invoice management. How we need to find a more "poptimistic" way of looking at our workloads. How do we feel personally about them? Rather than relying on the standard invoice processes laid down in the 60s and 70s, as "authentic" as they may seem.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    15,874

    Default

    I just heard a guy here say "clear as mud" to mean "very clear".

    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,615

    Default

    try this one on for size,

    'bread & butter business'

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,615

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post
    "pro-active".

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,626

    Default

    I'll stand up for 'touch base', actually. It's a stupid phrase (and I always have to be careful not to say 'touch cloth' instead by mistake) but it describes something that I have to do quite regularly for which there's no other simple expression, ie go and have a chat with someone without any specific information to give or get but to make sure that you're both basically happy and in agreement with how things are going on some project for which you're both partially responsible, and that there aren't any lurking issues in the offing...

    Generally, though, all this jargon is just another slang, isn't it? It seperates the insiders who can speak it from the interlopers who have to try to fake it.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    15,874

    Default

    "ProActive" sounds like it should be some kind of energy bar or drink, marketed by an obnoxiously clean-cut sports 'personality'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slothrop View Post
    I'll stand up for 'touch base', actually. It's a stupid phrase (and I always have to be careful not to say 'touch cloth' instead by mistake) but it describes something that I have to do quite regularly for which there's no other simple expression, ie go and have a chat with someone without any specific information to give or get but to make sure that you're both basically happy and in agreement with how things are going on some project for which you're both partially responsible, and that there aren't any lurking issues in the offing...
    I think 'keep in touch' is fine for this - but here, that gets shortened to 'KIT'. Think of the seconds - literal SECONDS! - you could save in a year by saying and typing 'KIT' instead of 'keep in touch'!
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 01-09-2010 at 12:36 PM.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    South East London
    Posts
    1,463

    Default

    one of my friends works in marketing and she once told me that her boss said "let's hoist this idea up the flagpole and see if it flies". ugh. who comes up with these phrases, and how do they circulate into general usage? i refuse to believe people are taught this at university marketing courses.

    edit: i see john already beat me to it with the flagpole one
    Last edited by BareBones; 01-09-2010 at 01:33 PM. Reason: lateness

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Toughmanistan
    Posts
    473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    I just heard a guy here say "clear as mud" to mean "very clear".
    That's a reasonably common saying Mr. Tea.
    I read an interesting book about the most hedious wesel words and non-non-nonsensical sentences you could ever image. Full page quotes from corporate companies marking teams. Hideous stuff, although the book was focused on Australian politicians which made it a little hard to follow.

    Makes me shudder just thinking about it.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    15,874

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Awesome View Post
    That's a reasonably common saying Mr. Tea.
    How do you mean? I know "clear as mud" is a common saying, but it means "not clear at all" (mud being notoriously unclear, at least in my neck of the woods). Or do you mean that the misuse of the phrase is common? I've heard of it being mangled in this way before - my brother told me he once had a famously dense boss who used to say things like that - but I'd have hoped it's not 'common', as such. That'd just be depressing.

    I've bitched on here before about Americans who say "I could care less" to mean "I could NOT care less". The fuck is that all about? It's not like it's a syntactically challenging sentence!
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,615

    Default

    yea I hate it when american's say that, also, when people say, 'i can't be asked' you what? it's arsed you moron. (well i think it is, i can't be asked doesnt make sense?)

    Yea 'as clear as mud' definitely means not clear atall, why anyone would say it to mean 'yes that's clear' is beyond me, unless they are trying to be funny, which isn't atall funny.
    Last edited by alex; 01-09-2010 at 02:11 PM. Reason: uncertainty

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    ottawa
    Posts
    2,958

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    I've bitched on here before about Americans who say "I could care less" to mean "I could NOT care less". The fuck is that all about? It's not like it's a syntactically challenging sentence!
    "I'm going down the pub"

    Surely some monetizing synergies can be extracted from this thread, if we're being pro-active that is.
    Last edited by nomos; 01-09-2010 at 02:26 PM.
    BOOK: sound/bodies // paul.autonomic deeptime.net

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    toronto
    Posts
    2,662

    Default

    Without office jargon the jobs of many middle-managers look ridiculous, redundant and certainly not worth the higher income they get paid. I have one manager right now, this pathetic try-hard with a obnoxiously loud and bleating nervous laugh, who speaks entirely in business-speak all of the time. I don't think it's a coincidence that his job seems to consist entirely in describing other peoples' jobs to them in terms they don't understand so that it appears that he is organizing them - despite not really doing anything himself.

    Just the other week he held an hour long meeting to introduce a "database that will incentivize a two-deep initiative so we can be on the ball with deliverables and improve DR strategy." Turns out what he meant was: "I've spent hours with the IT guy making a spreadsheet to show you that when someone is off sick, someone needs to cover for them so we can still get work done." How insightful.

    It took every ounce of strength in my body not to rase my hand and ask the most obvious question: "In terms of DR, can you communicate a strategy for maintaining office productivity in cases where the entire office is having an hour long meeting on how to prevent work not being done?"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •