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Thread: Cyclonopedia

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenks View Post
    I have been deep into the Sebag Montefiore biog of Stalin - a 700+ page brute. Cylclonopedia is next up.

    Could I ask quite why everyone on here is so exited about this book - it's generated more buzz than any other book club read offered so far.
    I was really excited about it cos I read some of R.N's work in the Collapse journals and just thought it was the most far out shit I'd read in a long time, so was really excited to have a longer work to look through.

    I'm enjoying it so far, quite alot actually, it feels very 21st century which is a nice feeling. It's nice to see theory and fiction kinda blended together; I have no idea of what is true and what isn't in the work and so reading it from that position puts you in sort of this dream state to begin with, which works. It conjures up that 'none of this is actually happening' kind of state of shock, very Interzone-y.

  2. #17
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    "Could I ask quite why everyone on here is so exited about this book - it's generated more buzz than any other book club read offered so far."
    I think that the premise just sounded really interesting. Unfortunately I have had very little time to get going on it at all but I'm about sixty pages in I think.

  3. #18
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    Mine finally turned up today. And not a day too soon, I haven't had anything to read in weeks.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 07-01-2010 at 05:51 PM.
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  4. #19

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    I do want to read this -- but given the events of the last month or so, I want to read When Genius Failed first.

  5. #20
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    Heh, that was cool - I'd just read about the first two pages of the prologue when I changed trains at Mile End earlier, and noticed the guy in front of me was wearing a white tee-shirt with a design on the back taken from one of those ancient Assyrian cylinder seals found in Iraq. Just as well I'm not superstitious - or, indeed, hyperstitious.

    Edit - the deity in the winged orb, from this seal:

    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 11-03-2011 at 02:18 PM.
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  6. #21
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    elders from the watery sirius B star system???

  7. #22
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    I'm only a few pages in, but I couldn't resist having a quick flick through the rest of it and have spotted a number of daft and/or obscure puns like 'Mecca-nomics' and 'Tiamaterialism' - someone's already mentioned 'blobjectivity' - something tells me I'm going to like this book.

    The diagram of the 'Cross of Akht' on p13 is kind of a visual pun, too, I think - anyone else see it as a sort of cartoon of a big spurt of oil coming out of the ground?
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  8. #23
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    I think you'll like alot of it Mr Tea, there's heaps of cthulu later on that'll be right up your street, dunno how you'll find the more deleuzian stuff.

    I had a weird correspondance with it as well, around the second chapter there's a quote from D&G about Eisenstein's Strike, which I read the day after I'd done a live remix of 'Strike' at some gig. I like it when that happens.

  9. #24
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    The first (and only?) Muslim character in X-Men is a woman called Dust who's power is to turn into a dust-like substance and back again.

    Just an interesting parallel with the ideas regarding dust in Cyclonopedia.

    Last edited by Pestario; 07-10-2008 at 01:19 PM. Reason: red x

  10. #25
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    Rich, I'm finding a sort of resonance between oil-as-'Tellurian-Lube' in this book and the mysterious and insidious 'Black Gas' that Manning and Drummond wibble on about in The Wild Highway - of course that's in darkest (in every sense) Africa, not the Middle East, but it has a similar feel to it, I think.
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  11. #26
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    "Rich, I'm finding a sort of resonance between oil-as-'Tellurian-Lube' in this book and the mysterious and insidious 'Black Gas' that Manning and Drummond wibble on about in The Wild Highway - of course that's in darkest (in every sense) Africa, not the Middle East, but it has a similar feel to it, I think."
    Annoyingly I actually can't remember that I'm afraid, although the concept itself rings a distant bell I've no idea how it fitted into the rest of book.

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    Starting again tonight. I have high hopes for it after all the love expressed here.

  13. #28
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    I'm 40-odd (and I mean *odd*) pages in, and I have to say it's by a country mile the wankiest thing I've ever read - but then, whoever said wanking isn't fun?
    I think I'm just going to enjoy the beyond-theoretical prose as something that sounds cool without really meaning anything, a bit like the way Soundgarden lyrics sounded cool when I was 16...it does amuse me, maybe even slightly worry me, to think there are people out there who read (and write!) this kind of stuff with the attitude that it's to be taken in any way seriously - I mean, is this the case? Vimothy, you said you read or used to read Hyperstition, is that really where those guys are at?

    Something else that struck me is the incredible extent to which this kind of post-structuralism or critical theory or whatever you call it fetishises the language of mathematics - kinda makes me think "well if you get that much of a hard-on for vectors and vortices, go and study some real maths, then you can write stuff that sounds cool AND means something", heh.

    Anyway, it must be affecting me somehow because here I am logged on to dissensus at 2am, posting about it. I hope the book's not going to fall foul of the 'fiction rule of thumb' from xkcd.com, just a couple of days ago:



    Something about Cyclonopedia seems to generate coincidence or synchronicity - must be the cthonic flux of Tellurian lube engendering fractal Trison-cells in the dracage zone.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 08-10-2008 at 01:05 AM.
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  14. #29
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    I had a head scratching 30 pages with it last night.

    I thought - are they taking the piss - I mean Dean R Koontz?

    Then i thought maybe I'm just not bright enough, but mostly i thought surely this arcane level of detail must mean something.

    I suppose what it means iis that i am intrigued but also highly sceptical at the same time. Is it a D+G version of the Da Vince code?

    My wife asked me waht it is about and I said 'i dunno - i think oil and the middle east but the pages of numerology regarding the cross of ahkt are confusing me', she laughed.

  15. #30
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    I finished it the other day but was holding off comment to see what other people would say about it just in case I totally missed the point. But I'm happy to see other people just as baffled as I was . I'm new to the hyperstition thing so I felt waaay out of depth with Cyclonopedia. But after pushing through and just immersing myself in the extreme post-structuralist theory I came to enjoy exploring this theoretical wonderland even I didn't grasp a lot of it. I think it requires some suspension of belief and it's more enjoyable if you at least imagine that all of it is true. I guess that's the fiction side of this work of 'theory-fiction'.

    Anyway, at the end of it, Negarestani's twisted view of the middle east was fascinating, to say the least.

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