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Thread: can't believe how bad the Libertines are

  1. #16
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    NME or whoever naming him Man of the year was the most pathetic thing I've read in a long while.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mms
    jesus even warp have signed a franz ferdinand soundalike.
    no no no, thats a _post punk_ band, everybody knows even the word indie is too dirty to touch,
    but the concepts are so universal heartwarming and comfortable, jeez you music lover types! just relax and enjoy it
    ===> okay that last said tongue firmly in cheek. <===

    its kindof upsetting about the renormalization of the representation of the word 'punk' to legitimise the narrow boredom of boy indie rock
    i suppose its all about 'punk' revival about now (+/- five years) cos the boys who bought the second wave, marketed, surface-punk records as kids are now the ones running the business...

    i was trying to explain to my friend the other day why i think ruff squad is more punk than franz furryland... i dunno what logan would say to that

  3. #18

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    Most people like "Indie" music because they say "they're actually playing instruments". Ignorance is so funny.
    As much as I despise most guitar based music there is some good stuff out there and you can't forget the punk movement which was really the most exciting thing to happen in music since Jesus was born.

  4. #19
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    But punk was more about getting past R and R; certainly post-punk was (cf Simon's new book). Keith Levene of PiL was quite upfront about wanting to destroy rock and roll. Slits, Banshees, Raincoats, Fall, Magazine, Gang of 4, none of this had anything to do with jingle-jangle maudlin melodic whining. That's one of the depressing ironies about the unbelievably crap Franz Ferdinand (they sound so stiff-jointed that I always want to reach for the WD40 every time I hear them): there was a pre-Brits puff piece on them in which they were celebrated as the 'return of real rock' or somesuch. Yes, quite, that shows how their utilization of post-punk influences is not only utterly bereft of imagination, it is actually directly contrary to everything post-punk aimed for.

    Whatever happened to modernism?

  5. #20

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    For me punk is about just doing what you want and not being "cool". So yeah agree that it goes past Rock n Roll in that sense. I think it is a lot bigger than that as well though. A recognition of something fundamentally wrong with the world.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by k-punk
    But punk was more about getting past R and R; certainly post-punk was (cf Simon's new book). Keith Levene of PiL was quite upfront about wanting to destroy rock and roll. Slits, Banshees, Raincoats, Fall, Magazine, Gang of 4, none of this had anything to do with jingle-jangle maudlin melodic whining. That's one of the depressing ironies about the unbelievably crap Franz Ferdinand (they sound so stiff-jointed that I always want to reach for the WD40 every time I hear them): there was a pre-Brits puff piece on them in which they were celebrated as the 'return of real rock' or somesuch. Yes, quite, that shows how their utilization of post-punk influences is not only utterly bereft of imagination, it is actually directly contrary to everything post-punk aimed for.

    Whatever happened to modernism?

    people are always wanting real rock to come back, oasis and that, solid white things that normal people can understand or some patronising stalinist dogshit.

    neo post punk just copies some of the musical tropes of records that some of these bands have heard, it doesn't apply the ideas and ruptures of that period of music which is principally what music constantly needs.
    god knows london at the very least can do it, fuck all these suckers.
    jesus i know alot of people in appauling indie bands that they are all thinking of leaving cos they haven't found success or whatever. wastemen that should no better.

    I have alot of faith in pop music doing this, its at a grass roots now in the uk but i really think this year there might be some awesome pop music, just hearing that maurice fulton version of an annie track recently, which is totally magic, also mu etc, toxic last year, i have some faith at the moment.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by k-punk
    Whatever happened to modernism?
    Modernism vs Modernity ?
    I guess the music which has the quality of modernity is the one who's able to open a dialogue with the past;
    I was wondering a lot about 'Modernity' as the perpetual 'NOW' these past days, writing about Scritti Politti's 'Early', how they managed to catch the sound of this era in their first release, 'Skank Bloc Bologna', especially the instrumental '28/8/78' ; a younger friend of my girl came home, saying he loved the Franz ; I played him 'Entertainment' by Gang of Four, he was stunned
    Another friend going wild about Bloc Party, etc. It reminds me The Jam's 'Sound Affects', maybe not their best, but this is a great record interms of 'Dialoguing with the past', something I don't catch in BP stuff.
    Shruggy ?

  8. #23
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    anyone watch the nme awards? Absolutely vindicated some of the thoughts on this thread - a procession of guitar bands with genetically-cloned power chords all using the precise same level of distortion & tone - unbelievably anodyne lyrics and songs that should have at least had the dignity to last less than 3 minutes but for some reason went on and on - ersatz passion by the shedload - i cringed and shrugged all the way through it

  9. #24
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    Indie Modernity is effectively still Postmodernity....

    I wrote this TEN YEARS ago, but it still seems truer than ever of indie shillyshambling ....

    'Generation X was always out of time: arriving after the orgy, it found itself exiled from the progressivist aspirations of the sixties counterculture and thrown into the seamless temporality of MTV - a temporality Jameson, writing just as MTV was just beginning to broadcast, was already describing when he wrote of "the disappearance of a sense of history, the way in which our entire contemporary social system has little by little begun to lose its capacity to retain its own past, has begun to live in a perpetual present and in a perpetual change..." (PCS 28) But this simultaneous perpetual present is nothing but the endless reiteration of the past: the airless no-time of "the classic", a timeless eternality removed from history because bereft of any sense of contingency.

    So while the postmodern scene is obsessed with the past, it is only historicist in the way that Nietzsche's "cosmopolitan fingerers" are. What Jameson has called ˘the nostalgia mode÷ is characterised by an atemporal mix Šn' match aesthetic that has moved beyond the model of linear development on which historical narrative is premised. That constantly recurring feature of the postmodern scene, the ironically revived text, is ˘ a complex object in which on some level children and adolescents can take the adventures straight, while the adult public is able to gratify a deep and more properly nostalgic desire to return to that older period and to live its strange old artifacts through once again.÷ (PCS 19) A deep cynicism lies hidden behind an apparent generosity: Britpop may just be a reheated version of the past, but it is ˘new to the kids÷, giving them ˘a chance to experience what they missed÷. The revived artifact emerges as doubly transcendent, offering a transcendence not only of the present (from which it seeks to escape into a supposedly more coherent past), but also of the very past it affects to fetishise (since ironic distance and a little modification here and there allow us to enjoy the past without the embarrassment of being actually immersed in it) .'

    http://www.ccru.net/swarm1/1_pomo.htm

  10. #25
    be.jazz Guest

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    I'm very distant from and totally ignorant of any Libertines media hype, but I just heard the "Likely Lads" song on the radio and quite liked it, probably because of the live-ish sound quality, the little bit of blues in the guitar, the slightly dragging backing vocals and a general breeziness.

  11. #26
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    Which bit of that couldn't have been produced in 1964?

    Or, to put it another way: what is there in it that COULD ONLY have been produced in 2004?

  12. #27
    simon silverdollar Guest

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    the sad thing is that all around the country there's d-i-y scenes of people in guitar bands making strange, new, amazing music- bands like The Wow, Kill yrself, Hot Club de paris, Lords, and they don't get any recognition at all. instead the NME just hypes up worthless shit for dads who buy 3 records a year.


    largely, i hate my generation.
    apart from grime, i can't think of one decent thing that a largish number of people my age have shown any enthusiasm for.

    and i refuse to believe that ANYONE really likes stuff like athlete or snow patrol. people who think they like them don't really know what liking a band means.
    saying yr into athlete is like saying that yr into M+S socks.

    so, yeah, i hate my generation. i dread to think what we will be like when we're in charge of the country. i mean, if 60s radicals end up like our leaders now, what the fuck are WE going to become?!

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyboy
    I think that of the current crop of mainstreamy-indie guitar bands these days, you can do worse than the Libertines: Muse, Keane, Kasabian, Razorlight, Athlete, the list goes on. But that's not saying much as all those bands truly are godawful abominations.
    people, people - keane are NOT a guitar band. they have NO guitars!

    agreed on doherty, though. he's rubbish musically and, more to the point, a very unwell person. the complicity of the media in his downward spiral makes me want to barf. no matter how many supermodels he fucks (or probably doesn't, given the anti-aphrodisiac effect of opiates), heroin is never going to be a glamorous thing to do, but this intense concentration on his unravelling only serves to make it appear so.

    on a slightly different note - has anyone seen any of the nme awards things on channel 4 late at nightthis last week? each one a solid half-hour of soul-crushing tedium... i mean really fucking PAINFUL to watch because music is so much better than what is being thrown at people from all angles these days.

  14. #29
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    Elbow are pretty good in fact - their last album was excellent.

  15. #30
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    i can remember a time when i didnt know what liking a band meant
    at some level people do need help getting started from what the media throws them. maybe zines, file sharing, mp3 blogs can do part of that but todays methods either lack the reach or permenance (blogs) or are blunt tools (file sharing) compared to a john peel or the sea bourne commercially viable pirates of the sixties.
    grime within london has its own medium but the DIY scenes of england in general dont. partly because the format is so superficially similar looking to all the big boring rubbish out there - so no-ones going to distribute (or probably buy) your 'real' punk/guitar zine because they already have the NME talking about superficially postpunk bands. and even at the lower level you have a multitude of 'normal' indie journals like art-rocker or careless-talk-costs-lives, that tell you about the bands your expecting and keep you feeling comfortable.
    it would be cool to do a magazine with entirely obscure music which wasnt alienating because it carried a sampler (i suppose thats what wire and wire tapper thinks it is but its still seems needlessly faux intellectualising and culturally narrow to me).

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