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Thread: Endless Rush: UK Hardcore 1992-1994

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaron_shinn View Post
    I know I'm an outlier, but I am an American, and I bought all of those records in Columbus, Ohio. It's a college town in the midwest, certainly not a big city. And I played them at raves in Ohio and neighboring states. It was extremely underground then, and the few people who knew what was up were fairly close-knit. There was no popular or press support though. If you were in a shop that carried UK music mags, you might have seen Prodigy on the cover of Mixmag (I still remember the headline 'Did Prodigy Kill Rave?!?'), but that was the extent of the press, and 99.9% of people you'd meet had no idea that the music existed.
    Wow, crazy. Yeah, out here in California I have seen a few flyers for "oldskool" nights, and I know there was a small following back then that somehow caught wind of Ardcore. Some of the Gabber djs out here I think first got into Hardcore through that stuff. But generally by the time rave caught on on a larger scale here, I think it was right after that point.

    but that's crazy it had a following in Columbus. Also... dude, I actually lived in a suburb of Columbus.... Reynoldsburg... at that time, and moved out to Cali later that year. At that age I just remember a lot of New Jack Swing and Metal (was 12 at the time), of course, but wow. I know Columbus very well, my dad used to preach at a church in the German Village. I still miss the place sometimes.
    Last edited by Chris; 08-02-2009 at 09:09 PM.

  2. #17
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    My one time DJing at a rave was in NW Ontario back in 1993 and literally nobody came. Now that's underground I remember that feeling of being so far away and grabbing whatever tiny shreds of information I could find. None of this instant YouTube demystification back then. You could spend months or years trying to piece things together. Starting around 1990/91 I was following UK rave stuff as much as I could through magazines like Streetsound that I'd pick up on trips to Toronto. But apart from the odd mixtape or record I mostly had to imagine what it all sounded like until several years later.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaron_shinn View Post
    Interesting points. I think the remoteness of ardcore to hipsters is both geographic and temporal...

    ...Back to the hipsters though - I think of hipsters as being predominantly young. As in 18 to 28 or so, and as such, they would have been barely old enough to buy their own lunch in 1992, let alone import 12"s. They don't have a personal connection to ardkore, and they don't have any popular, ardkore-loving tastemakers to emulate, so the music remains lost to inattention. .
    Yep I was 7 in 1992. Got into jungle via grime, Dizzee & Wiley back in '03, after the übercoolische hype died off I was still so intrigued by the music, so different from anything I'd ever heard (I remember thinking of it like Wu-Tang on speed) that I wound up following it, almost entirely through the Interent, back to jungle. Aside from a few friends I've infected with the junglist bug almost no one I meet has any idea what I mean when I say my favorite music is "jungle. Lot of wtf? stares.

    I wouldn't be too hard on the "hipsters" either. Or at least I mean it's such a nebulous term.

    Quote Originally Posted by aaron_shinn View Post
    White guys with gtrs indeed. It's discouraging isn't it?
    Yeah but just tbc I love a lot postpunk & krautrock. Plus you gotta respect a lot of those guys for in the former case trying to fuse cutting edge black musics with white gtr tosh and in the latter case for shit, just about everything.

    Quote Originally Posted by aaron_shinn View Post
    Still, I think of the cult of Northern Soul...
    I thought Northern Soul was actually a working class thing? I mean obviously there must've been a network of DJs/producers/record collectors (though no musicians or labels) but there was still a Northern Soul massive that showed up every weekend to take speed and dance all night. Just like w/arkdore except swap E in for speed. Not multiracial like ardkore though I guess.

  4. #19
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    Northern Soul is quite a weird, interesting scene when you think about it. It's still rather odd (but IMO cool) that it managed to get as big as it did and stay popular for so long. You could - and I think others have - compare it to bassline house in a lot of respects. Both popular in the big North of England cities, and both based around keeping faith with a musical style - speed garage for bassline, Motown-style soul for NS - that people had moved on from in other parts of the country. So it seems at first like they're movements that are literally reactionary and can't produce any real cultural energy. But both scenes went on to not only produce their own distinctive culture - working-class but very sharp and dressy for Northern Soul - but also their own recognisable sound - in NS, like the upbeat, high-tempo end of Motown, typically with very demonstrative, almost melodramatic emotions to it. And both scenes arrived at the sound by sort of honing in and intensifying what they loved about the earlier music. People will say today about a new song sometimes, 'Oooh, that's got a real Northern Soul sound to it', and it means something slightly different from a 'Motown sound to it' or 'a 60s soul sound'.
    What I've never been sure about though - and maybe someone could put me right -is whether, in the 70s heyday, djs at NS nights were just playing out 60s stuff and focusing on a certain selection, or whether there were actually artists and labels that kept producing new music in a similar style aimed only/mainly at that audience? I suspect it was a mixture of the two. I do know that some songs were re-released and became to various degrees chart hits in the 70s on the back of their popularity on the scene, and that acts that were more or less dried up in the States, and had often been second-division artists in the first place, regularly toured the circuit and became cult favourites. Like I say, weird but cool.

  5. #20
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    Slimzee & Tubby bank holiday old skool set on Rinse from last Sunday.

    http://www.dubplate.net/rinse/podcas...tubby24509.mp3

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by massrock View Post
    Slimzee & Tubby bank holiday old skool set on Rinse from last Sunday.

    http://www.dubplate.net/rinse/podcas...tubby24509.mp3
    Dude, thanks! I listened to that at the time and loved it, and remember kicking myself for not recording it. Downloading without further delay!

  7. #22
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    It's the Rinse podcast, just I'd mention it cos it's really good and people might have missed it what with the sunsheeine and everything. This thread seemed as good a place as any.

  8. #23
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    Yeah I spotted when I clicked the link, I don't really follow the podcasts though, so thanks anyway for bringing it to attention.
    'Endless rush' is pretty fuckin spot on for the tunes they play btw.

  9. #24
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    Default narra mine

    i wasn't there in 92. recently heard of genaside II who were doing stuff around this time, my friend found this in a charity shop...


    armand van helden remixed it...twice...


    g-double-e remix...

    obligatory functional acid rub...


    sirens of acre lane...

    this from the 'new life 4 tha hunted' album...

  10. #25
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    You could do much worse than to listen to that Slimzee/Tubby set above if you didn't. It's a fantastic selection, no kidding. Out to the snowball crew.

  11. #26
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    They appear to lose the plot right at the end which seems kind of fitting.

  12. #27
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    To massrock or anyone else that d/l'ed this: do you know the name of the track that they play immediately before Noise Factory - Straight From The Bedroom?
    Prob about 2 hrs 25 in (!), it has a horn sample that sounds like its either the same or very similar to the one used on War for 94, but pitched differently, plus a dude yelling out what sounds like 'didn't mi ever tell you about the raggamuffin business an ting'. Suspect it may be quite well know, but I'm not getting it.

  13. #28
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    My ID request from that set is a dubstep choon. 15mins in. What is it?

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ach! View Post
    My ID request from that set is a dubstep choon. 15mins in. What is it?
    SP:MC - Trust Nobody

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by massrock View Post
    You could do much worse than to listen to that Slimzee/Tubby set above if you didn't. It's a fantastic selection, no kidding.
    thanks for that. was a mad listen!

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