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Thread: Books with life-changing qualities

  1. #31
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    for me:
    thus spake zarathustra
    myth of sisyphus


    those two books altered my world view more than any other influence in my life, i reckon.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by baboon2004 View Post
    Tick and tick. Thanks for all the other suggestions too - have been meaning to check out Barthes (not Fabian (-z) - I bet his books would be rubbish) for ages.

    As for Catch-22, why would anyone be ashamed? A book the first chapter of which is still side-splittingly funny 56 years after it was written is a rare commodity indeed.
    Well I certainly wouldn't be ashamed of it, and neither would I suggest to anyone else that they should be. But my comment was just in reference to it being one of the classic 'teenage revelation' books that Sick Boy was alluding to. See also: Catcher In The Rye, which personally I wasn't too keen on, but am prepared to acknowledge is me being totally and utterly wrong, having had many people whose literary tastes I respect gush praise to me about it over the years. Oh, and anything by Camus (who I think is great, esp The Plague).

  3. #33
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    Default lol rly why?

    Quote Originally Posted by baboon2004 View Post
    have been meaning to check out Barthes (not Fabian (-z) - I bet his books would be rubbish) for ages.
    surely you know camus played in goal for algiers? and i'd be all over any book by cantona

  4. #34
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    im always baffled by this sort of thing. ive never read a book that came remotely close to changing my life. i forget them a couple of days after i finish them.

  5. #35
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    Not sure about life-changing, but if we are talking about impact on me as an individual,





    Ness Rowlah

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by woops View Post
    surely you know camus played in goal for algiers? and i'd be all over any book by cantona
    Oh, absolutely! But I was never that convinced by Barthez's interesting qualities. Naturally leads to a which-football-players'-books-would-you-like-to-read? type question. For me:

    Grobelaar, Zidane, Robbie Savage.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by baboon2004 View Post
    Robbie Savage.
    I'd be interested to read a book about Robbie Savage, but not by him. He strikes me as a man of zero self-awareness.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    By Paulo Coelho? Surely not. I thought that was the worst book I'd ever had the misfortune to be tricked into reading. I actually felt insulted that someone had the temerity to splurge that kind of bilge on to paper and then ask people for money in exhange. And I felt physically sick that it seemed to be working.
    Ok yes, it is soppy and reads more like an extended horoscope but I read it at a point in my life where I was in the middle of leaving everything behind to move to a new country. I was basically freaking out about it but this book reassured me that it was the right thing to do.

    Another book I just remembered, The Long Emergency by J H Kunstler. I read it during uni and it was instrumental in turning me into a car hating, anti-suburbia, petro-fascist.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pestario View Post
    Ok yes, it is soppy and reads more like an extended horoscope but I read it at a point in my life where I was in the middle of leaving everything behind to move to a new country. I was basically freaking out about it but this book reassured me that it was the right thing to do.
    Was it?

  10. #40
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    so far yes

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    im always baffled by this sort of thing. ive never read a book that came remotely close to changing my life. i forget them a couple of days after i finish them.
    You lie.

  12. #42
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    Can't think of a book that's changed my life. A good dictionary and the London A-Z have proved essential, though. I'm very post-modern in this respect.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by crackerjack View Post
    I'd be interested to read a book about Robbie Savage, but not by him. He strikes me as a man of zero self-awareness.
    Which is why it would be hilarious.

  14. #44
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    I can't say that many books have changed my life either, which I suppose is why I started this thread. There have been a handful however that have altered the way I think about things.

  15. #45
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    the alchemist is the most appalling cod-philosophical airport level drivel.

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