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Thread: Apartheid in the EU

  1. #1
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    Default Apartheid in the EU

    this is a nice report, mostly based on documentation from the various euro bodies that are planning and implementing the process
    Quote Originally Posted by Neoconopticon ch13 - R&D for global apartheid, Statewatch
    http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/n...con-report.pdf
    Frances Webber has observed that “The number of deaths at sea ought to have reduced dramatically as a result of such intensive surveillance of sea traffic by the EU border patrols, the armed forces of Europe and of the southern Mediterranean.
    But the numbers drowned, or listed as ‘missing’, continue to rise, despite – or in some cases because of – surveillance and interception”.156 With companies like Boeing and EADS winning highly lucrative contracts in countries like the USA and
    Saudi Arabia, the idea that the EU needs to subsidise growth in this area seems exaggerated to say the least. The R&D spend seems designed instead to meet the EU’s own policy objectives. Since 1993, the anti-racist organisation UNITED has maintained a list of documented deaths at the hands of ‘Fortress Europe’.157 It currently stands at 13,250 (the actual number of deaths is inevitably much higher). If there is a role for the subsidy of R&D in this fi eld, it should surely start with the principle of increasing safety at sea. Though as UNITED says, if 13,250 deaths doesn’t prick Europe’s conscience, what will?
    This story has been all over today,
    Scientists Decry "Flawed" and "Horrifying" Nationality Tests
    http://blogs.sciencemag.org/sciencei...-agencys.html#
    Quote Originally Posted by Frances again, as always, totally on the ball
    http://www.irr.org.uk/2009/september/ha000014.html
    The use of science to enforce legal distinctions between people has a bad history. Apart from the inevitable echoes of eugenics, Nazis and apartheid, in Britain, the imposition of virginity testing on wives from the Indian subcontinent in the late 1970s led to picketing of Heathrow airport, and the use of X-rays to determine children's ages was discredited as dangerous as well as unreliable.

    True, volunteering a strand of hair or a snip of fingernail or a spit of saliva is obviously not as degrading as virginity tests nor as physically dangerous as X-raying children. And DNA testing is now routinely used by applicants to prove that the children they are seeking to bring in to the country are their own. But the voluntary nature of submission is questionable: As with ID cards, refusal to cooperate is bound to lead to enhanced suspicion and refusal of the application.

    Quite apart from the commonplace indignity of never simply being believed, of always being forced to prove the obvious, the danger of these tests lies in their incapacity to establish precisely the fact that is being tested, which, as previously mentioned, is a legal, not a biological category. Many British citizens, born and bred in far-flung corners of the world, would 'fail' a human provenance test.
    now don't get me wrong here,
    i would say i'm pro-Yurp, (i'm loving rubbing in that we shoulda joined the euro when we had the chance) but the main impact of opening the borders seems to have been negative, played out on the bodies of non-EU wretched of the earth

    see here:
    Quote Originally Posted by بدون سرحد
    http://calaismigrantsolidarity.wordpress.com/

    * Wednesday 30 September

    Eritrean Squat evicted.
    This morning around 7:30 seven CRS vans turned up at the Eritrean squat. They arrested 15 people, but 30 or 35 managed to escape, or they had papers. After the CRS emptied the building they put a big fence all around the building. Police and workers are there to keep an eye on the place.



    Hunger Strike starts today at 12

    In response to the brutal destruction of the ‘jungle’ migrant camp in Calais by French authorities, around 30 people demonstrated yesterday near the French Embassy in Knightsbridge, London.

    * Tuesday 29th September

    As of 9am French time today 11 migrants in Calais started a highly visible hunger strike in the port area.

    The migrants, from regions including Iran, Afghanistan, Sudan, Palestine, and Egypt, say they will continue the strike until Western countries co-operate to offer them asylum. They are also demanding that no migrant in Calais is readmitted to Greece, Italy or Malta.

    The migrants face constant harassment from police. Every day some amongst their number are arrested, taken to the police station only to be released in four to six hours. Occasionally they are held for as long as two days. Repression intensified recently with the destruction of the jungle where many migrants lived, the trigger-happy use of tear gas including on pregnant women, destruction of personal belongings and the targeting of migrants observing fasting during Ramadan by arresting them at nightfall and throwing away their food. If the police try to separate the hunger strikers or arrest them on spurious grounds, they say they will continue the hunger strike while under arrest and move again to a public space to continue the action when freed.

    No Borders activists are already supporting the hunger strikers by standing alongside them, but the migrants are calling for support from all over the world. Messages of support can be left at http://calaishungerstrike.wordpress.com and the hunger strikers welcome anyone who wants to join the hunger strike in solidarity whether in Calais or elsewhere.

    Benjamin, 38, an asylum seeker from Iran, says: “The police tell us we cannot be here but we have nowhere to go. The world is ignoring us so we are making our suffering public by going on hunger strike in full view. Tourists moving through the port and exercising their freedom of movement will be forced to see our lack of freedom until Western governments work together to offer us somewhere to build a new life safely.”

    With migrants facing increasing repression and winter approaching, the situation is urgent. But they say Western countries should not abrogate their responsibilities by readmitting migrants to the first European country they were fingerprinted in. Many migrants who are readmitted to Italy, Greece and Malta say the situation is much worse there than living clandestinely in Calais and that they are oppressed there. In Greece, readmitted migrants are often locked up for three months and increasingly for six months. On release, migrants still have nowhere to go and continue to be targeted by police who beat them and sometimes rip up their papers. Readmission is not the solution according to the hunger strikers – countries including the UK, Canada, USA and Sweden should take a proportion of the hunger strikers.
    i'm hearing worse stories from people who were in calais last weekend
    if any london/south folks want to send stuff, support or cross the channel get in touch

  2. #2

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    i'm loving rubbing in that we shoulda joined the euro when we had the chance
    OT, but: Why?

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    we could have got it cheap

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    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    OT, but: Why?
    cos we're currently hovering 10% above parity - and cos I'm going to France next week

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    big up Sufi

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    Yeah, but that's a (very) good thing. Bummer if you're a tourist, of course (and Paris had the most expensive beer of any place I've ever visited).

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    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    (and Paris had the most expensive beer of any place I've ever visited).
    there speaks a man who's never been to norway

    so why's it good, apart from for exporters?

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    I have been to Norway, but I was five.

    As for the cheap pound, well, it's good for exporters and soveriegn debt. That's probably about it, but it's not trivial. I'm sure Ireland would kill to be in our position.

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    I mean, currency devaluation is the classic depression busting, neighbour beggaring, pesky-imbalance correcting policy. I'm fully signed up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    I mean, currency devaluation is the classic depression busting, neighbour beggaring, pesky-imbalance correcting policy. I'm fully signed up.
    &what about the other parts of the eu/uk agenda?
    cf.OP

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    Embarrassingly, I have no idea what that could even mean...

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    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    Yeah, but that's a (very) good thing. Bummer if you're a tourist, of course (and Paris had the most expensive beer of any place I've ever visited).
    Seconded, I was there a couple of months ago & it was around 8 euros a pint. Comical. Food was expensive too.
    ** pandemonium ad asbo **

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    Quote Originally Posted by CHAOTROPIC View Post
    Seconded, I was there a couple of months ago & it was around 8 euros a pint. Comical. Food was expensive too.
    (sigh) So whaddya reckon for daily spend (minus accom.) if you just do all the obvious touristy versailles/louvre/eiffel/notre dame thing and don't drink much or go clubbing? My friends say 50 Euros a day but I fear this may be underestimate.

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    i've only ever been through the outskirts of Paris (my time in France has been limited to various provincial northern towns or the coast) so this may be a very stupid question: aren't there loads of bars where you can get reasonable plonk for very little? (i mean, compared to the robbery you're all reporting for a glass of Krony.)

    just wondering. thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottdisco View Post
    i've only ever been through the outskirts of Paris (my time in France has been limited to various provincial northern towns or the coast) so this may be a very stupid question: aren't there loads of bars where you can get reasonable plonk for very little? (i mean, compared to the robbery you're all reporting for a glass of Krony.)

    just wondering. thanks.
    i'm counting on this

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