polystyle

Well-known member
Yeah I love Curb but find Seinfeld really annoying... I can see there is something of the same humour in there but I struggle to sit through a whole episode of it.
Never saw one ep. of Seinfeld or many US TV ( Friends and so on ).
Can't keep up w everything was the thought there : )
The CURB guy IS funny - at least in ad / trailer size bites.
Don't want to have him behind me on a check out line tho'.
 

Leo

Well-known member
Larry David is comic genius, and also a manifestation of people I've met IRL. pardon the enormous, politically incorrect stereotype but the "neurotic jew" is a fixture in NYC, and possibly even funnier when transplanted to LA. Seinfeld was an early, commercial version of Larry humor for a mainstream audience on network TV. Curb on HBO is full-on Larry. Larry unbridled.
 

polystyle

Well-known member
Larry David is comic genius, and also a manifestation of people I've met IRL. pardon the enormous, politically incorrect stereotype but the "neurotic jew" is a fixture in NYC, and possibly even funnier when transplanted to LA. Seinfeld was an early, commercial version of Larry humor for a mainstream audience on network TV. Curb on HBO is full-on Larry. Larry unbridled.
And much prefered ... unbridled !
Gotcha on the Jewish NY thing.
I mean hey , cannot but help but notice the phenom
 

pattycakes_

Well-known member
it's great going back to Seinfeld after Curb and spotting the Larryisms

Steinbrenner was a great character. The Calzone a fave ep
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Been watching this true crime documentary about The Long Island Serial Killer called The Killing Season - in one sense it's frustrating and a bit silly cos it's spun out over six episodes and despite a massive clue turning up at the end of each one you know they are never gonna actually find the guy cos no-one ever did. Also it's a bit sensationalised and at times ridiculous.
But I am enjoying the thing as a whole; what you learn about Long Island, what you learn about America. Sometimes a documentary maker takes a theme and a title for their film and then the documentary isn't really about that but instead it's used as a tool to lever things apart and to explore bigger issues and reveal deeper truths.... this isn't one of those times, at least not deliberately I think, and yet it sort of does that by accident. Something about all these massive fat Americans in their SUVs getting outraged cos someone has the temerity to look at them while they are in their private property, the crazy guy faking a heart attack to avoid an interview, the weird pervs and their sex rings that seem to provide the background as a matter of course, the crips gangleader connected to one of the victims.... the out there theories about two serial killers competing to mark the territory, in fact the whole fucking thing about there being so many serial killers in the US, why?
 
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Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Started watching The Society last night - not to be confused with the excellent 80s body-horror film of nearly the same name - and it seems quite promising after the first episode. The premise is that a load of high school students get evacuated from the town where they live because of a mysterious, nauseating smell that pervades the whole area, which has no apparent source but is presumed to be a health hazard, so they're all loaded into buses and packed off for an impromptu field trip while the smell is investigated. Hours pass, night falls, and the students are eventually dropped off - right back where they started (or so it seems). The town is completely deserted, and while the kids can phone each other, they're unable to reach their parents, emergency services, or anyone else outside the town. Attempts to leave the town the next day are aborted after all the roads and railway lines are found to be blocked.

I suppose it both does and doesn't conform to the well established clichés of this sort of TV. It's like, oh look, some preternaturally good-looking teenagers (they're all slim and don't have a single spot between them) having friendships, enmities and love triangles, and basically doing Normal Teen Stuff, in an apparently idyllic small town in Middle America - I wonder if All Is Not As It Seems? But this is sort of subverted by the weird smell being introduced in the very first scene, and the premise is set up before the episode is halfway over. The actors are, I guess, maybe 19- and 20-year-olds playing 17-year-olds, but at least they're not 25 like in Twin Peaks.

The most obvious point of comparison is Lord Of The Flies, and we've already got one character set up as the smart, sensible kid who wants to find rational explanations and practical solutions to problems, whose foil is the sociopathic bully and would-be dictator. And a scene where the kids help themselves in an abandoned supermarket is straight out of Dawn Of The Dead. But the most interesting point, I think, is that the show is from 2019, and seems very prescient in its depiction of ordinary life being turned upside down by an invisible, threatening Thing in the air, and how people can react either by banding together or turning in each other...
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Started watching The Society last night - not to be confused with the excellent 80s body-horror film of nearly the same name - and it seems quite promising after the first episode. The premise is that a load of high school students get evacuated from the town where they live because of a mysterious, nauseating smell that pervades the whole area, which has no apparent source but is presumed to be a health hazard, so they're all loaded into buses and packed off for an impromptu field trip while the smell is investigated. Hours pass, night falls, and the students are eventually dropped off - right back where they started (or so it seems). The town is completely deserted, and while the kids can phone each other, they're unable to reach their parents, emergency services, or anyone else outside the town. Attempts to leave the town the next day are aborted after all the roads and railway lines are found to be blocked.

I suppose it both does and doesn't conform to the well established clichés of this sort of TV. It's like, oh look, some preternaturally good-looking teenagers (they're all slim and don't have a single spot between them) having friendships, enmities and love triangles, and basically doing Normal Teen Stuff, in an apparently idyllic small town in Middle America - I wonder if All Is Not As It Seems? But this is sort of subverted by the weird smell being introduced in the very first scene, and the premise is set up before the episode is halfway over. The actors are, I guess, maybe 19- and 20-year-olds playing 17-year-olds, but at least they're not 25 like in Twin Peaks.

The most obvious point of comparison is Lord Of The Flies, and we've already got one character set up as the smart, sensible kid who wants to find rational explanations and practical solutions to problems, whose foil is the sociopathic bully and would-be dictator. And a scene where the kids help themselves in an abandoned supermarket is straight out of Dawn Of The Dead. But the most interesting point, I think, is that the show is from 2019, and seems very prescient in its depiction of ordinary life being turned upside down by an invisible, threatening Thing in the air, and how people can react either by banding together or turning in each other...
Turns out I'm talking bollocks and all the actors were born in the 90s, and in many cases the early 90s, lol.
 

wild greens

Well-known member
Been watching this true crime documentary about The Long Island Serial Killer called The Killing Season - in one sense it's frustrating and a bit silly cos it's spun out over six episodes and despite a massive clue turning up at the end of each one you know they are never gonna actually find the guy cos no-one ever did. Also it's a bit sensationalised and at times ridiculous.
But I am enjoying the thing as a whole; what you learn about Long Island, what you learn about America. Sometimes a documentary maker takes a theme and a title for their film and then the documentary isn't really about that but instead it's used as a tool to lever things apart and to explore bigger issues and reveal deeper truths.... this isn't one of those times, at least not deliberately I think, and yet it sort of does that by accident. Something about all these massive fat Americans in their SUVs getting outraged cos someone has the temerity to look at them while they are in their private property, the crazy guy faking a heart attack to avoid an interview, the weird pervs and their sex rings that seem to provide the background as a matter of course, the crips gangleader connected to one of the victims.... the out there theories about two serial killers competing to mark the territory, in fact the whole fucking thing about there being so many serial killers in the US, why?

We watched this a while back on one of the murder channels on Sky

There is a better- I think- documentary on the Long Island Killer by Louise Osmond, which is just about the long island lad. Think the wheels really fall off this killing season one you've watched after the 3rd or 4th

Voiceover is annoying as well I think he's putting extra gravel in his voice for no reason
 

Leo

Well-known member
been on a Scandie crime noir kick the past year, both seasons of Finnish drama "Bordertown" is mostly really good.
 

craner

Beast of Burden
Brian Cox
Simon Reeve
Alastair Sooke

They're all the same fucking person, it's a cyborg

No way can they all be real
 

Leo

Well-known member
check out "Dogs of Berlin" on Netflix, really good crime drama: cops, bent cops, Turkish gangs, Turkish bikers, German gangs and Neo-Nazi groups all battling each other.
 

version

Well-known member
Finished S1 of The Terror earlier. Really liked it. Some of the effects and make up were a bit crap, you could tell they were on a set at times and it had that digital look that a lot of stuff does these days, but it drew me in and I ended up watching all ten episodes within a few days.

 
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