Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Thanks for all this stuff, version. I'll have a read of it presently.

All I'll say for now is that I've thought for a long time that what we need is both better technology and a lot less of it. Quality not quantity. It's astonishing how much software gets released that clearly just is not up to the job, that requires patches before it's usable or represents a step backwards from the previous iteration. And this is specific to computer and phone technology - it doesn't happen with cars (say) because nobody would put up with it.

But there is definitely a tendency to automate things for the sake of it, and the result often isn't just gratuitous, it's worse than what we had before, whether it's self-service checkouts or bus stops with a fucking smartphone code instead of a timetable.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
There's an interview with Bjork's "co-creative director" on The Guardian where he says: "It’s so beautiful seeing tears coming out of the bottom of a VR headset."
 

DLaurent

New member
Simple answer is yes. I love being a luddite. Music, technology, culture and otherwise. I've found I'm awful at forums and that's about the extent of my technology use other than a mobile phone.

I like to leave technology and the rest it to the intelligensia and government, who are always light years ahead of the people anyway. That I way I can pick up the pieces easily.

Except when it comes to other hobbies like coarse fishing, which gives me a bit of variety in life, and wouldn't think twice about spending £500 for a box to sit on.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Fuck this.

Imagine carrying just about everything you need beneath the surface of your hand -- your wallet, keys and ID, all in a microchip. That’s reality in Sweden, as some early-adopters implant the tiny devices beneath their skin.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Fuck this.

Imagine carrying just about everything you need beneath the surface of your hand -- your wallet, keys and ID, all in a microchip. That’s reality in Sweden, as some early-adopters implant the tiny devices beneath their skin.
This microchip Mark of the beast thing has been around since the 90s at least, probably much earlier. It's why the BCG injection you get as a kid leaves a bulge beneath the skin. This is one the most fundamental conspiracy theories of them all.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I wonder how long before it becomes compulsory. There are companies which force employees to sign up to social media and there are some offering an optional chip already.

Wisconsin Company Offers To Implant Chips In Its Employees

A Wisconsin company is offering to implant tiny radio-frequency chips in its employees – and it says they are lining up for the technology.

The idea is a controversial one, confronting issues at the intersection of ethics and technology by essentially turning bodies into bar codes. Three Square Market, also called 32M, says it is the first U.S. company to provide the technology to its employees.

The company manufactures self-service "micro markets" for office break rooms. It said in a press release that obtaining a chip is optional, but expects that about 50 employees will take part.

Employees who have the rice-grain-sized RFID chip implanted between their thumb and forefinger can then use it "to make purchases in their break room micro market, open doors, login to computers, use the copy machine," 32M said.
https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo...ns-to-start-implanting-chips-in-its-employees
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
The guy's as weird as the robot, maybe even weirder. It's like he can't process the idea that there may be a negative side to his work. He also comes across as exactly the type of weirdo scientist you get in films who ends up having some dodgy relationship with the robot.
 
Top