DannyL

Wild Horses
Sorry, I meant the longer Grapejuice piece. I read the Secret Sun one but haven't watched the videos yet.
 

sadmanbarty

New member
something i wanted to post on the harlequin thread and forgot to was that in grant morrison's arkham asylum the joker's pathology is said to be some kind of cognitive evolution responding to urban environments. his personality was entirely malleable and as such was more adept at dealing with the rapid, ever-changing stimulation of city life.

it's the same phenomenon that i pointed to on the harlequin thread with tommy lee sparta's persona shifts responding to social media's non-stop information stream.
 

luka

Moderator
I've not read it all yet - started, but I had insomnia last night so am giving my brain a bit of a break.
I found that interview I heard with him really affecting though. I might have it wrong, but it felt like an dispatch from the frontlines.
Interview with who? You linked to an interview with someone named Greg Carlwood? Is that the right one?
 

sadmanbarty

New member
he's popular culture's most post-truthy character really. in the comics i think that the editors don't even let him have a definitive back story.

he's disinformation. a one-man russia today.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Deadpool could have gone similarly but he doesn't seem to have taken root to the same degree.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
In that recent show called Gotham they didn't have the rights to use The Joker so they broke him up into pieces with names starting with J. There's one called Jerome who's a loose cannon who staples his own face back on and kills himself, there's his brother called Jeremiah who is driven insane by Jerome and becomes a much colder, more calculating Joker and then at the end Jeremiah falls into a vat of chemicals and doesn't really have an identity anymore.

"I feel something new, crawling from the primordial ooze that was me. Something... beautiful."
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Another thing is that every version of The Joker seems to be intent on making everyone just like him. He's always putting his face on them in one sense or another.
 

luka

Moderator
Another thing is that every version of The Joker seems to be intent on making everyone just like him. He's always putting his face on them in one sense or another.
Which fits in with the harlequin idea, that there is a spirit which enters and animates a whole range of musicians in the '00s and '10s, which mutilates them physically in similar ways
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Dylan's health continues to deteriorate. He becomes increasingly paranoid about going to sleep, and fears Freddy Krueger, even though Heather has never shown Dylan her films. She visits Nightmare creator Wes Craven, who admits to having precognitive nightmares that the films captured an ancient supernatural entity. The entity is freed after the film series ended with the release of Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare. In the guise of Freddy it now focuses on Heather, as Nancy, its primary foe, as killing her will allow it into the real world. Freddy actor Robert Englund also has a strange knowledge of it, describing the new Freddy to Heather, and then disappearing from all contact shortly after. Following another earthquake, Heather takes a traumatized Dylan to the hospital, where Dr. Heffner, suspecting abuse, suggests he remain under observation. Heather returns home for Dylan's stuffed Tyrannosaurus while his babysitter Julie tries unsuccessfully to keep the nurses from sedating the sleep-deprived boy. Dylan falls asleep from the sedative. Freddy brutally kills Julie in Dylan's dream. Capable of sleepwalking, Dylan leaves the hospital of his own accord while Heather chases him home across the interstate as Freddy taunts him and dangles him before traffic. On returning home, Heather realizes that Saxon has established his persona as Don Thompson, and her street, the exterior of her house, and her clothes have transformed into Nancy's as reality starts to overlap with Freddy's make-believe realm. When Heather embraces Nancy's role, Freddy emerges completely into reality and abducts Dylan to his world. Heather finds a trail of Dylan's sleeping pills and follows him to a hellish construct of Freddy's boiler room.[1] Freddy fights off Heather and chases Dylan into a furnace. Dylan escapes the furnace, doubles back to Heather, and together they push Freddy into the furnace and light it. This destroys both the monster and his reality.

Dylan and Heather emerge from under his blankets, and Heather finds a copy of the film's events in a screenplay at the foot of the bed. Inside is written thanks from Wes for defeating Freddy and playing Nancy one last time. Her victory helps to imprison the entity of the film franchise's fictitious world once more. Dylan asks if it is a story, and Heather agrees that it is before opening the script and reading from its pages to her son.
 
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