Corpsey

call me big papa
When I first used to lurk on here there were always 200 page threads about subgenres - old established titans like the Grime thread, but also Juke, UK Funky, Deep Tech, blablabla

Is there nothing like this around now or is it just that we're all out of touch philosopher princes?
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
We've got dissensus youngers now so if anything we should be more in touch than before. It's just that music, as has been noted, discussed, picked over to a neurotic extent, is dead.

Stop listening to music. Stop worrying about the absence of music. Just ignore it. Leave it alone.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I think it's too fragmented for something like that to happen, but the 'road rap' thread is probably the last one like that, no? There's always 'The hip hop never ever ever stops' too.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
That comment mvuent posted in the Pitchfork thread sounded about right.

major publications will inevitably have to reflect some kind of "consensus", compromise, smoothing off rough edges. but the 2010s was a decade without consensus.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
We've got dissensus youngers now so if anything we should be more in touch than before. It's just that music, as has been noted, discussed, picked over to a neurotic extent, is dead.

Stop listening to music. Stop worrying about the absence of music. Just ignore it. Leave it alone.
It's not dead though is it? music generally goes in 100 year cycles. the next mass contemporary music wave will probably start to develop in the 2040s-50s and crystalise 2070s.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
dissensus and dance music in general got very enamoured with short historical duration music. now is the time to ease on the breaks and go back to the long duré, because we are already accelerating and crashing. the thril of accelerating no longer exists. it's standard.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
for instance Xenakis is not old music. it's still our contemporary music.

trip hop is intolerably contemporary, but that's where the value judgment becomes unavoidable.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
A watched kettle never boils. That's why we have declared music dead and no one is allowed to listen to it
 

thirdform

Well-known member
this is my stumbling block with barty's contention that 303 acid lines are on the other side of the time barrier for him. which, fair enough, no issue with that. It just seems to restrict all non-barrier music to the last 10 years. in which case conceptual writing wins over history. the trick is to unite the long duration and the rupture. jazz/funk/soul was probably a long duration of sorts, acid house was a sudden rupture.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
for instance Xenakis is not old music. it's still our contemporary music.

trip hop is intolerably contemporary, but that's where the value judgment becomes unavoidable.
One thing I like about YouTube is that it can strip the chronology from music. You can be listening to some new house tune one minute then end up on something from forty years ago the next. You don't have to follow any sort of linear timeline and can make your own connections.
 
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thirdform

Well-known member
One thing I like about YouTube is that it can strip the chronology from music. You can be listening to some old house tune one minute then end up on something from forty years ago the next. You don't have to follow any sort of linear timeline and can make your own connections.
well funnily enough, despite its totally now now instantaneous nature, it is kind of a harkening back to beethoven times. i mean, ludwig was contemporary music for yonks. until the end of the 19th century, really. then mahler and eventually schoenberg came along.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I can't decide whether we've reached a plateau or whether things just move so quickly that there's no time for anything to develop into something as solid as a scene or genre.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
The slow death of journalism and traditional media probably contributes too as it's often the journalists who connect the dots, say "this is something that's happening" and give it a name.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
I can't decide whether we've reached a plateau or whether things just move so quickly that there's no time for anything to develop into something as solid as a scene or genre.
in terms of the dj format, we've 100% reached a plateau. nowhere left to go. you can't mix 9/8 neo prog rock synth drum workouts.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
It feels like a neverending wake. Everything seems to have this sense of loss about it as though we're in a perpetual state of mourning.

 
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version

Who loves ya, baby?
Whether it works or not, I think it's clearly what they're going for with the spliced in YouTube comments and images of an empty UK.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
There's so much of this wistful dance music around at the moment, all those dusty house tunes peppered with references to 90s pop culture.
 
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