abolishing the album, the scene and the genre

Leo

Well-known member
Yeah, but isn't that the case for everyone? I guess critics are paid to do so though which alters the dynamic somewhat.
doesn't need to be critics, can just be someone whose tastes you respect. recommendations from knowledgable folk like third or craner, from there lists here.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
there's great opportunity in finding eye-opening rewards doing that, and a much greater opportunity for wallowing aimlessly in miles of mediocre artists.
well that was what i was trying to get at with creating this thread. was going through a jazz funk master cuts playlist last night in bed and by god was there some proper awful 80s porn smooth sax shit in there.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
doesn't need to be critics, can just be someone whose tastes you respect. recommendations from knowledgable folk like third or craner, from there lists here.
You don't get to that point without running the same risk though. They've probably heard more mediocre artists than anyone.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Don't get you lot today. I think third has thrown another of his confusion grenades and made it impossible for anyone to understand each other. Cognitive disintegration grenade.
 

Leo

Well-known member
speak for yourself, we're engaged and moving the dialogue forward in new and adventurous directions!
 

thirdform

Well-known member
Don't get you lot today. I think third has thrown another of his confusion grenades and made it impossible for anyone to understand each other. Cognitive disintegration grenade.
it's called chaos magick m8. will all start to unveil in the next 6 months.
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
as you and luka have said scenes and genres are already being abolished. but I don't think see any evidence yet that it leads to much good music, and tbh on the contrary part of why I like your posts third is that you seem more "rooted" in a certain lineage than almost anyone here.

"making your own map" sounds good and is what I'm doing, but isn't that a bit like what the post dubstep goldsmiths bogeyman you UK people are always talking about did?
 
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thirdform

Well-known member
I don't really have anything against post-dubstep kids per se. I don't think they ruined dance music, they just amplified the latent conservative good times aesthetic thousandfold and deprived it of any carnival-esque joy. the good times becomes the networking and having an enjoyable night out, not an ecstatic (or horrifying) overwhelming experience. So where I differ with them is I go to a club to get pounded by a funktion 1 system, not to even talk to anyone. in fact I find most club conversations really dire. Maybe it's because I'm asian and I'm never going to be caught dead telling someone how awesome they are in a public space, even if on pills. That's why I disagree with a lot of young English kids who are now all so cuddly and furry and open whilst the white mans narcissism still remains. give me an uptight, restrained, 'don't step on my toes' boozer any day.

This is not to say that some of my best friends aren't clubbers, they are, but those friendships never crystalised in the club and most times at pubs or someones place.
 
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mvuent

Void Dweller
maybe the reason the build your own map approach bothers me (even though I mostly enjoy doing it myself, on a day to day level) is that it seems so atomized. everyone with their own cute little idiosyncratic take on music history. but no reason to care about any of these takes. it’s interesting when you find someone with really unique yet convincing one, but that relies on there being a “common sense” view to rebel against.

I don't have anything against the post dubstep kids either. maybe a better example that blissblogger talks about in retromania is "record collection rock". bands like cul de sac have all your favorite bands as their influences and yet, while very good, seem to be missing something those influences had. (at least for me and I guess him--I'm sure they're someone's favorite band.) jim o'rourke never appealed to me for the same reason.

maybe with genres and scenes there's a "one level of removal" rule. you can make weird, unclassifiable music if it draws from an established scene, but not if you're drawing from other unclassifiable weirdos. that's what distinguishes cul de sac from their heroes beefheart and fahey, what makes them seem tepid by comparison. this relates to barty's point in the autecher haters thread about all the best music being "brimming with culture". you can still channel that magic when you're only one level away, but once the original culture is out of sight you can no longer access its power.

anways regardless of how you feel about cul de sac, I think it's obvious that a genre-less, scene-less future would lead to a lot more artists like them.
 
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thirdform

Well-known member
industrial power noise garage, wobble drill, halftime deeptech, acid grime, darkside bassline, speedcore breakstep, 300 bpm south african double time deep house.
 
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