Churches.

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Who loves ya, baby?
There's a Steven Seagal film where he goes up against a Jamaican gang and that one was sampled in a bunch of jungle tunes too.

 
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luka

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What's special about the voodoo gang in predator two is how they don't sound even remotely Jamacian.
 

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Who loves ya, baby?
I love the bit where they pull up in the zebra print car with fairy lights in it and an actual cloud of weed smoke. It's like some pisstake from GTA or something.

 
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luka

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The lighting and the colours there are very interesting. A lot like ghostbusters I reckon. Some kind of 80s pastiche of noir? Extremely theatrical not naturalistic.
 

luka

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Sufi is one of those people who have had an interesting life. To me those people feel like a completely alien species. It's an experience so far removed from my own. They make me feel a bit threatened, defensive, insecure.
 

sufi

lala
probably churches weren't always like dour and dutiful, i suppose back in the day people must have loved it, came from miles around to catch the latest doctrines
that all changed in the recent times - pact century or two, before that it must have been like visiting disneyland, or the most epic dj set

but all in slow motion - a visiting superstar preacher every decade or 2, new doctrines every couple of centuries and then it takes a month or two for the news to reach from avignon or constantinople anyway
 

luka

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Ever since I went to Winchester I've been fascinated by the spread of Christianity. A time when you could just wAnder off to a completely foreign country and convert it singlehandedly.
 

sufi

lala
Sufi is one of those people who have had an interesting life. To me those people feel like a completely alien species. It's an experience so far removed from my own. They make me feel a bit threatened, defensive, insecure.
i just was lucky enough to travel about when i was less tied down, not so much for the last few years though. mind you i think travel is like lsd in that it can fix those pre-existing tendencies and prejudices, did for me i reckon
 

sufi

lala
Ever since I went to Winchester I've been fascinated by the spread of Christianity. A time when you could just wAnder off to a completely foreign country and convert it singlehandedly.
sounds like you need to make a pilgrimage
 

luka

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I will if I come into some money. I used to hate the idea of travelling but that changed a year or so ago.
 

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Who loves ya, baby?
"For a symbol of power, St. Gaudens instinctively preferred the horse, as was plain in his horse and Victory of the Sherman monument. Doubtless Sherman also felt it so. The attitude was so American that, for at least forty years, Adams had never realized that any other could be in sound taste. How many years had he taken to admit a notion of what Michael Angelo and Rubens were driving at? He could not say; but he knew that only since 1895 had he begun to feel the Virgin or Venus as force, and not everywhere even so. At Chartres -- perhaps at Lourdes -- possibly at Cnidos if one could still find there the divinely naked Aphrodite of Praxiteles -- but otherwise one must look for force to the goddesses of Indian mythology. The idea died out long ago in the German and English stock. St. Gaudens at Amiens was hardly less sensitive to the force of the female energy than Matthew Arnold at the Grande Chartreuse. Neither of them felt goddesses as power -- only as reflected emotion, human expression, beauty, purity, taste, scarcely even as sympathy. They felt a railway train as power, yet they, and all other artists, constantly complained that the power embodied in a railway train could never be embodied in art. All the steam in the world could not, like the Virgin, build Chartres."
 

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Who loves ya, baby?
I've only read that chapter and yeah, it is weird. The way he refers to himself in the third person throws me off a little.
 
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