Feral World Globalised Ecosystems

Corpsey

call me big papa
Saw those green parrots on Hampstead Heath during my infamous acid trip. I had no idea they were there or anywhere in London so it absolutely blew me away, like a visitation from the angelic host.
 

luka

Moderator
Saw those green parrots on Hampstead Heath during my infamous acid trip. I had no idea they were there or anywhere in London so it absolutely blew me away, like a visitation from the angelic host.
Love stuff like that. Opened a window to the impossible. And they flew in. Wormhole to the tropics.
 

luka

Moderator
Common invasive species traits include the following:

Fast growth
Rapid reproduction
High dispersal ability
Phenotype plasticity (the ability to alter growth form to suit current conditions)
Tolerance of a wide range of environmental conditions (Ecological competence)
Ability to live off of a wide range of food types (generalist)
Association with humans[18]
Prior successful invasions[19]
Typically, an introduced species must survive at low population densities before it becomes invasive in a new location.[20] At low population densities, it can be difficult for the introduced species to reproduce and maintain itself in a new location, so a species might reach a location multiple times before it becomes established. Repeated patterns of human movement, such as ships sailing to and from ports or cars driving up and down highways offer repeated opportunities for establishment (also known as a high propagule pressure).[21]
 

luka

Moderator
An invasive species might be able to use resources that were previously unavailable to native species, such as deep water sources accessed by a long taproot, or an ability to live on previously uninhabited soil types.
 

luka

Moderator
The 11th Duke of Bedford introduced the muntjac, a small asian deer, to his Woburn estate at the turn of the century. Escapees successfully bred and have now spread over much of the country. They have since become widespread throughout the Epping Forest district.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eWkQZgOJqIk
 

freakyrixx

New member
Javan mongooses in the Adriatic (island of Mljet):

Small Asian mongooses were introduced onto the island in the early 20th century in order to reduce the venomous snake population (the island was apparently completely overrun). Whilst the mongooses completed this task, they also disposed of pretty much all the birdlife of the island. To this day, the island is notably short of hedgerow birds, such as sparrows. Mongooses are a hazard for domestic poultry, and are also known to cause damage in vineyards and orchards.
eradication seems to be the standard way of dealing with invasive species populations and it just sounds horrible. like yeah we brought you here, that's on us, but look since you turned out to be too fit to survive and thrive here we'll need to exterminate you all.

so now i have a lot of sympathy for invasive species even though there's no doubt they can cause massive damage to ecosystems.
 

luka

Moderator
It's almost impossible to eradicate them once established. New Zealand managed it on a very small island that had a rat problem once but anything on a larger scale you're going to fail
 
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